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Game Interaction State Graphs for Evaluation of User Engagement in Explorative and Experience-based Training Games
University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
Stockholm University, Sweden.
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2010 (English)In: 2010 International Conference on Advances in ICT for Emerging Regions (ICTer 2010), IEEE conference proceedings, 2010, 40-44 p.Conference paper, (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

There is an increasing interest to use computer games for non-traditional education, such as for training purposes. For training education, simulators are considered as offering more realistic learning environments to experience situations that are similar to real world. This type of learning is more beneficial for practicing critical situations which are difficult or impossible in real world training, for instance experience the consequences of unsafe driving. However, the effectiveness of simulation-based learning of this nature is dependent upon the learner’s engagement and explorative behaviour. Most current learner evaluation systems are unable to capture this type of learning. Therefore, in this paper we introduce the concept of game interaction state graphs (GISGs) to capture the engagement in explorative and experience-based training tasks. These graphs are constructed based on rules which capture psychologically significant learner behaviours and situations. Simple variables reflecting game state and learner’s controller actions provide the ingredients to the rules. This approach eliminates the complexity involved with other similar approaches, such as constructing a full-fledged cognitive model for the learner. GISGs, at minimum, can be used to evaluate the explorative behaviour, the training performance and personal preferences of a learner.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE conference proceedings, 2010. 40-44 p.
Keyword [en]
serious games, game interaction, experience-based systems, engagement, driving simulator training
National Category
Computer and Information Science
Research subject
Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-4714DOI: 10.1109/ICTER.2010.5643272Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-78650931850ISBN: 978-1-4244-9041-7 OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-4714DiVA: diva2:394273
Conference
2010 International Conference on Advances in ICT for Emerging Regions, ICTer 2010; Colombo; 29 September 2010 through 1 October 2010
Available from: 2011-02-02 Created: 2011-02-02 Last updated: 2013-09-06Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf