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The shape of the spatial kernel and its implications for biological invasions in patchy environments
IFM Theory and Modelling, Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping, Sweden.
University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
IFM Theory and Modelling, Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping, Sweden.
2011 (English)In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 278, no 1711, 1564-1571 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ecological and epidemiological invasions occur in a spatial context. We investigated how these processes correlate to the distance dependence of spread or dispersal between spatial entities such as habitat patches or epidemiological units. Distance dependence is described by a spatial kernel, characterized by its shape (kurtosis) and width (variance). We also developed a novel method to analyse and generate point-pattern landscapes based on spectral representation. This involves two measures: continuity, which is related to autocorrelation and contrast, which refers to variation in patch density. We also analysed some empirical data where our results are expected to have implications, namely distributions of trees (Quercus and Ulmus) and farms in Sweden. Through a simulation study, we found that kernel shape was not important for predicting the invasion speed in randomly distributed patches. However, the shape may be essential when the distribution of patches deviates from randomness, particularly when the contrast is high. We conclude that the speed of invasions depends on the spatial context and the effect of the spatial kernel is intertwined with the spatial structure. This implies substantial demands on the empirical data, because it requires knowledge of shape and width of the spatial kernel, and spatial structure.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Royal Society , 2011. Vol. 278, no 1711, 1564-1571 p.
Keyword [en]
kurtosis, spread of disease, point patterns, spectral density, dispersal, invasion
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Natural sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-4690DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2010.1902ISI: 000289719100016PubMedID: 21047854Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-79954480754OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-4690DiVA: diva2:393795
Available from: 2011-02-01 Created: 2011-02-01 Last updated: 2012-12-14Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full textPubMedScopushttp://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/278/1711/1564

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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