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Onset of Vocal Interaction Between Parents and Newborns in Skin-to-Skin Contact Immediately After Elective Cesarean Section
Karolinska Institute.
Karolinska Insitute.
University of Agricultural Sciences, Skara.
University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
2010 (English)In: Birth, ISSN 0730-7659, E-ISSN 1523-536X, Vol. 37, no 3, 192-201 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Cesarean  section  is  associated  with  delayed  mother-infant interaction  because  neither the mother nor the father routinely maintains skin-to-skin contact with  the  infant  after  birth. The  aim  of the  study was  to  explore  and compare  parent-newborn vocal interaction when the infant is placed in skin-to-skin contact either with the mother or the father immediately after a planned cesarean section.  Methods: A total of 37 healthy  infants  born  to  primiparas  were  randomized  to  30 minutes  of  skin-to-skin  contact either  with  fathers  or  mothers  after  an  initial  5 minutes  of  skin-to-skin  contact  with  the mothers after birth. The newborns’ and parents’ vocal interaction were recorded on a vid-eotape and audiotape. The following variables were explored: newborns’ and parents’ soliciting, newborns’ crying and whining, and parental speech directed to the other parent and to   the   newborn.  Results: Newborns’   soliciting   increased   over   time   (p = 0.032).   Both fathers  and  mothers  in  skin-to-skin  contact  communicated  more  vocally  with  the  newborn than did fathers (p = 0.003) and mothers (p = 0.009) without skin-to-skin contact. Fathers in skin-to-skin contact also communicated more with the mother (p = 0.046) and performed more  soliciting  responses  than  the  control  fathers  (p = 0.010).  Infants  in  skin-to-skin  con-tact  with  their  fathers  cried  significantly  less  than  those  in  skin-to-skin  contact  with  their mothers (p = 0.002) and shifted to a relaxed state earlier than in skin-to-skin contact with mothers (p = 0.029).  Conclusions: Skin-to-skin contact between infants and parents immediately after planned cesarean section promotes vocal interaction. When placed in skin-to-skin  contact  and  exposed  to  the  parents’  speech,  the  infants  initiated  communication  with soliciting calls with the parents within approximately 15 minutes after birth. These findings give reason to encourage parents to keep the newborn in skin-to-skin contact after cesarean section, to support the early onset of the first vocal communication.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley Periodicals Inc. , 2010. Vol. 37, no 3, 192-201 p.
Keyword [en]
cesarean section, cry, fathers, mothers, newborns, parent-infant interaction, skin-to-skin contact, soliciting sound
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-4516DOI: 10.1111/j.1523-536X.2010.00406.xISI: 000281514300003Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-77956315265OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-4516DiVA: diva2:382229
Available from: 2010-12-30 Created: 2010-12-30 Last updated: 2013-04-09Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Citation style
  • apa
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More styles
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