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Multispecies and Multiscale Conservation Planning: Setting Quantitative Targets for Red-Listed Lichens on Ancient Oaks
University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
Gothenburg University.
Gothenburg University.
2010 (English)In: Conservation Biology, ISSN 0888-8892, E-ISSN 1523-1739, Vol. 24, no 3, 758-768 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Species occurrence in a habitat patch depends on local habitat and the amount of that habitat in the wider landscape. We used predictions from empirical landscape studies to set quantitative conservation criteria and targets in a multispecies and multiscale conservation planning effort. We used regression analyses to compare species richness and occurrence of five red-listed lichens on 50 ancient oaks (Quercus robur; 120–140 cm in diameter) with the density of ancient oaks in circles of varying radius from each individual oak. Species richness and the occurrence of three of the five species were best explained by increasing density of oaks within 0.5 km; one species was best explained by the density of oaks within 2 km, and another was best predicted by the density of oaks within 5 km. The minimum numbers of ancient oaks required for “successful conservation” was defined as the number of oaks required to obtain a predicted local occurrence of 50% for all species included or a predicted local occurrence of 80% for all species included. These numbers of oaks were calculated for two relevant landscape scales (1 km2 and 13 km2) that corresponded to various species responses, in such a way that calculations also accounted for local number of oaks. Ten and seven of the 50 ancient oaks surveyed were situated in landscapes that already fulfilled criteria for successful conservation when the 50% and 80% criteria, respectively, were used to define the level of successful conservation. For cost-efficient conservation, oak stands in the landscapes most suitable for successful conservation should be prioritized for conservation and management (e.g., grazing and planting of new oaks) at the expense of oak stands situated elsewhere.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Society for Conservation Biology , 2010. Vol. 24, no 3, 758-768 p.
Keyword [en]
ancient oak, habitat amount, old-growth oak woodland, red-listed lichens, spatial scale
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Natural sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-4323DOI: 10.1111/j.1523-1739.2009.01423.xISI: 000277690900018PubMedID: 20067490Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-77956578968OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-4323DiVA: diva2:345407
Available from: 2010-08-25 Created: 2010-08-25 Last updated: 2012-11-21Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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