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Empathy with Computer Game Characters: A Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective
Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, School of Psychology, University of Wales Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2AS, United Kingdom.
University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
2005 (English)In: AISB’05 Convention Social Intelligence and Interaction in Animals, Robots and Agents: 12-15 April 2005  University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, UK: Proceedings of the Joint Symposium on Virtual Social Agents: Social Presence Cues for Virtual Humanoids Empathic Interaction with Synthetic Characters Mind Minding Agents, the Society for the Study of Artificial Intelligence , 2005, 73-79 p.Conference paper, (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper discusses recent findings concerning the brain mechanisms underlying visuomotor, visuotactile, and visuo-affective mappings and their relevance to understanding how human players relate to computer game characters. In particular visuo-affective mappings, which are regarded as the foundation for the subjective, emotional elements of empathy, come into play especially during social interactions, when we transform visual information about someone else’s emotional state into similar emotional dispositions of our own. Understanding these processes may provide basic preconditions for game character identification and empathy in three main cases discussed in this paper: (1) when the game character is controlled from a first-person perspective; (2) when the character is controlled from a third-person perspective; and (3) when the character is seen from a thirdperson perspective but not controlled by the player. Given that human cognition springs from neural processes ultimately subserving bioregulation, self-preservation, navigation in a subjective space, and social relationships, we argue that acknowledging this legacy - and perhaps even regarding it as a path through design space - can contribute to effective human-computer interface design.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
the Society for the Study of Artificial Intelligence , 2005. 73-79 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-1660Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-77950235430ISBN: 1 902956 49 2 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-1660DiVA: diva2:31936
Conference
AISB'05 Convention: Social Intelligence and Interaction in Animals, Robots and Agents - Joint Symposium on Virtual Social Agents: Social Presence Cues for Virtual Humanoids Empathic Interaction with Synthetic Characters Mind Minding Agents; Hatfield; 12 April 2005 through 15 April 2005
Available from: 2007-08-06 Created: 2007-08-06 Last updated: 2013-03-18

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Scopushttp://osiris.sunderland.ac.uk/~cs0lha/Empathic_Interaction/Morrison.Ziemke.pdfhttp://www.aisb.org.uk/publications/proceedings/aisb2005/10_Virt_Final.pdf

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