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Strategies in assessing post operative pain: A South African study
Department of Nursing Education, North-West University, South Africa / Faculty of Nursing, North-West University, South Africa.
University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
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2005 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 22, no 1, 12-21 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this validation study was to describe strategies used in postoperative pain assessment among a group of nurses in South Africa. A mixed qualitative and quantitative study was conducted in a 950-bed academic hospital complex. Surgical nurses (n = 12) carried out pain assessments of postoperative patients (n = 36) in pain. Data were collected using detailed interviews and pain intensity was estimated on a visual analogue scale (VAS, 0–10 cm). Nurses used four categories of criteria (a) how the patient looks, (b) what the patient says, (c) the patient's way of talking, and (d) experience of similar circumstances and drew on their past experiences in five different ways: (a) some patients report lower pain intensity than expected, (b) a typology of patients, (c) a focus on listening to patients, (d) what to look for, and (e) what to do for patients were identified.

The system of categories described by Sjöström [Sjöström B. Assessing acute postoperative pain. Assessment strategies and quality of clinical experience and professional role. Göteborg: Acta Universitatis Gothoburgensis; 1995] was valid for this sample with an additional category. The different categories seem to be complementary and necessary for assessing pain in others. The findings have implications for professionals who provide care for patients in pain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2005. Vol. 22, no 1, 12-21 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-1620DOI: 10.1016/j.iccn.2005.05.001PubMedID: 16005235Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-30744477002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-1620DiVA: diva2:31896
Available from: 2008-01-09 Created: 2008-01-09 Last updated: 2013-04-09Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf