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Assistant Nurses in the Swedish Healthcare Sector during the 1990s: A Hard-hit Occupational Group with a Tough Job
Natl. Inst. for Phychosocial Med., Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
Natl. Inst. for Phychosocial Med., Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Institute of Health Care Pedagogics, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
2005 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 33, no 2, 107-113 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: The aim of the study was to explore hospital-based assistant nurses' experiences of psychosocial “stressors”, following a period of substantial layoffs (43%) and ongoing healthcare reorganizations. Methods: An interview study was carried out with 11 assistant nurses working in the same hospital. The interviews took place in 1997, in connection with the last round of redundancies, and were followed up in 1998 and then in 2001. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed; the content was then analysed. Results: Two main themes were identified from the women's perceived stressors: (a) a hard-hit occupational group experiencing “energy-consuming adjustments”, and a “weak position” at the continuing workplace. Job insecurity meant fear of losing valued work tasks in nursing care (de-skilling). The common feature was the duality in the women's descriptions of feeling qualified in nursing care but being treated like a maid, or having intimate practical knowledge but no formal competence; (b) a tougher but underpaid job including “heavy workload” concurrent with “organizational shortcomings”, and “frozen salary trends” with a simultaneous feeling of lacking the power to improve their situation. Conclusions: Our results underscore the importance of the employer's attention to the remaining workers in connection with downsizing, particularly when the reduction of the workforce has been as dramatic as in this case. It is also important to understand the ongoing dilemma (strain) for the assistant nurses, who are faced with increasing demands for further formal qualifications in hospital care, while maintaining a strong occupational desire to keep their highly valued job working close to the patient.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2005. Vol. 33, no 2, 107-113 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-1567DOI: 10.1080/14034940410019154ISI: 000228196000005PubMedID: 15823971Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-17244382017OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-1567DiVA: diva2:31843
Available from: 2007-10-10 Created: 2007-10-10 Last updated: 2013-04-09Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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