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Acceptance of Entertainment Systems in Stroke Rehabilitation
University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9578-7410
University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
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2009 (English)In: Proceedings of IADIS Game and Entertainment Technologies 2009 (GET 2009), IADIS Press , 2009, 75-83 p.Conference paper, (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Game-based tools for rehabilitation of different types of physical and cognitive impairments are becoming more and more popular. By introducing an element of fun, these systems aim at increasing patients' motivation to train and, from a further perspective, improve recovery rates. There is, however, a question whether such tools will be fully accepted by the intended target group. Earlier work on user acceptance has mainly focused on utility systems, i.e. systems used mainly in the work place. However, people use systems for different reasons and that makes it difficult to apply the same principles on systems with the main purpose to entertain. Serious games have characteristics from both utility and entertainment systems, which makes it interesting to study the acceptance of these kinds of systems. In this study, we have developed a home-based entertainment system for stroke rehabilitation, with focus on rehabilitation of motor impairments. By analysing the gaming behaviour and interview responses of five stroke patients, we investigate factors influencing user acceptance of this specific type of system. The results show that current models of acceptance are not sufficient to fully explain acceptance of serious games in general and serious games for rehabilitation in particular. Besides well-known factors, such as perceived usefulness, perceived ease-of-use and perceived enjoyment, other, more specific, factors also play a vital role in the acceptance of the system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IADIS Press , 2009. 75-83 p.
Keyword [en]
User Acceptance, Technology Acceptance model (TAM), Serious Games, Virtual Rehabilitation, Stroke
National Category
Computer Science
Research subject
Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-3199ISBN: 978-972-8924-85-0 OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-3199DiVA: diva2:225288
Conference
IADIS International Conference Game and Entertainment Technologies, Algarve, Portugal, 17-19 June, 2009
Available from: 2009-06-25 Created: 2009-06-25 Last updated: 2015-06-10Bibliographically approved

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Alklind Taylor, Anna-SofiaBacklund, PerEngström, HenrikJohannesson, MikaelKrasniqi, HanifeLebram, Mikael
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