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Patient as active partner – clue to successful early mobilization in intensive care
Department of Health and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden ; Department of Physiotherapy, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. (Välbefinnande vid långvariga hälsoproblem (WeLHP), Wellbeing in Long-term Health Problems)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9423-9378
Department of Health and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Section for Research and Education, Kungälv Hospital, Sweden.
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2023 (English)In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: The evidence for the benefits of early mobilization in intensive care is growing. Early mobilization differs from most other interventions in intensive care since the patient’s participation is requested. What kind of challenges this entails for the intensive care clinicians, and what is crucial in successful early mobilization from their perspective, is sparsely explored and was therefore the purpose of this study. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were held with 17 intensive care clinicians, seven nurses, five assistant nurses and five physiotherapists. The interviews were analyzed with a phenomenographic methodology. Findings: Four descriptive categories emerged: 1) Taking responsibility; 2) Taking the patient’s perspective; 3) Time or not time to mobilize; and 4) The “know-how” of early mobilization. Early mobilization was perceived as an important and crucial part of intensive care. It includes positioning and sensory stimulation, which could be used to re-orientate the patient and prevent delirium. The patients’ experiences were considered individual with a mix of strong emotions. Despite the stated significance of early mobilization, different conceptions were expressed about the right time, some of them based on concerns for the patient, and some due to safety concerns. In the optimal active mobilization to upright positions there was an emphasis on careful preparation and patient involvement, including negotiation and active participation. Conclusions: The importance of early mobilization is indisputable. Successful early mobilization is achieved by applying a person-centered approach, involving the patient as an active partner. Early mobilization comprises positioning and sensory stimulation and should be included in the daily planning of patient care. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2023.
Keywords [en]
Barriers, clinician, early mobilization, intensive care, person-centredness
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Wellbeing in long-term health problems (WeLHP)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-23086DOI: 10.1080/09593985.2023.2239891ISI: 001036439900001PubMedID: 37489585Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85165670360OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-23086DiVA, id: diva2:1786771
Note

CC BY NC-ND 4.0

© 2023 The Author(s). Published with license by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Published online: 25 Jul 2023

Taylor & Francis Group an informa business

CONTACT Annika Söderberg annika.soderberg@gu.se Department of Health and Rehabilitation/Physiotherapy, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, SE 405 30, Sweden

The work was supported by the Skaraborg Research and Development Council, Skövde, Sweden [VGFOUSKB- 932496]; Research Fund at Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden [VGSKAS-981105]; Skaraborg Institute [15/1028].

Available from: 2023-08-10 Created: 2023-08-10 Last updated: 2023-10-10Bibliographically approved

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Karlsson, Veronika

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