Högskolan i Skövde

his.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • apa-cv
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Work-related stress, reason for consultation and diagnosis-specific sick leave: How do they add up?
Unit of Occupational Therapy, Department of Health and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4304-9459
Unit of Occupational Therapy, Department of Health and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). (Research on Citizen Centered Health, University of Skövde (Reacch US))ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4616-9525
2023 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 18, no 7, article id e0288751Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Work-related stress is common in Western society and disorders associated with stress are often managed in primary health care. This study was set to increase the understanding of the relationship between reason for consultation, work-related stress and diagnosis-specific sick leave for primary health care patients. The longitudinal observational study included 232 employed non-sick listed patients at seven primary health care centres in Sweden. Of these patients, 102 reported high work-related stress, as measured with the Work Stress Questionnaire, and 84 were on registered sick leave within one year after inclusion. The study showed that, compared to those who did not report high work-related stress, highly stressed patients more often sought care for mental symptoms (60/102 versus 24/130), sleep disturbance (37/102 versus 22/130) and fatigue (41/102 versus 34/130). The risk for sick leave with a mental diagnosis within a year after base-line was higher among patients reporting high work-related stress than among those who did not (RR 2.97, 95% CI 1.59;5.55). No such association was however found for the risk of sick leave with a musculoskeletal diagnosis (RR 0.55, 95% CI 0.22;1.37). Seeking care for mental symptoms, sleep disturbance and fatigue were associated with having a future mental sick leave diagnosis (p-values < 0.001), while seeking care for musculoskeletal symptoms was associated with having a future musculoskeletal sick leave diagnosis (p-value 0.009). In summary, compared to those who did not report high work-related stress, patients with high work-related stress more often sought care for mental symptoms, sleep disturbance and fatigue which lead to a mental sick leave diagnosis. Reporting high work-related stress was, however, not linked to having sought care for musculoskeletal symptoms nor future sick leave due to a musculoskeletal diagnosis. Hence, both patients and general practitioners seem to characterize work-related stress as a mental complaint.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2023. Vol. 18, no 7, article id e0288751
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Research on Citizen Centered Health, University of Skövde (Reacch US)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-23045DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0288751ISI: 001033830400010PubMedID: 37463145Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85165519876OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-23045DiVA, id: diva2:1783115
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2014-0936
Note

CC BY 4.0

anna-maria.hulten@gu.se

This study was funded by grant 2014-0936, received by KH, from the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (https://forte.se/). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Available from: 2023-07-19 Created: 2023-07-19 Last updated: 2023-10-10Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(989 kB)68 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 989 kBChecksum SHA-512
52b7af66e673148079a6e81fa3696a67b159322eb8476a4324e7576b0a774f14d1ad8e6cc40ac0787deb6ae7a5f012895c8184d011f128c53e873b3c6b4aefc9
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records

Bjerkeli, Pernilla

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Hultén, Anna-MariaBjerkeli, Pernilla
By organisation
School of Health SciencesDigital Health Research (DHEAR)
In the same journal
PLOS ONE
Occupational Health and Environmental HealthPublic Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 68 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 202 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • apa-cv
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf