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Changed health behavior improves subjective well-being and vice versa in a follow-up of 9 years
Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland ; Research Services, Turku University Hospital, Finland.
Institute of Clinical Medicine, Psychiatry, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland ; Mental Health and Wellbeing Center, Kuopio University Hospital, Finland.
Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland ; Research Services, Turku University Hospital, Finland ; Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland ; Centre for Population Health Research, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Finland.
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2022 (English)In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 66Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Previous research on health behavior and subjective well-being has mainly focused on interindividual differences or explored certain domains of health behavior. Good health behavior and subjective well-being at baseline can predict each other after a follow-up. In the present cohort study, we explored the outcomes of change for an individual i.e., how changed health behavior is reflected in subsequent subjective well-being and vice versa. Methods: Data (n = 10,855) originates from a population-based Health and Social Support (HeSSup) study on working-age Finns in 2003 and 2012. A composite measure of health behavior included physical activity, dietary habits, alcohol consumption, and smoking status (range 0–4, worst–best) and a composite measure of subjective well-being (with reversed scoring) included three life assessments, i.e., interest, happiness, and ease in life, and perceived loneliness (range 4–20, best–worst). Different multiple linear regression models were used to study how changes in health behavior predict subjective well-being and the opposite, how changes in subjective well-being predict health behavior. Results: A positive change in health behavior from 2003 to 2012 predicted better subjective well-being (i.e., on average 0.31 points lower subjective well-being sum score), whereas a negative change predicted poorer subjective well-being (i.e., 0.37 points higher subjective well-being sum score) (both: p < 0.001) compared to those study subjects who had no change in health behavior. Similarly, when a positive and negative change in subjective well-being was studied, these figures were 0.071 points better and 0.072 points worse (both: p < 0.001) health behavior sum score, respectively. When the magnitude of the effect of change was compared to the range of scale of the outcome the effect of health behavior change appeared stronger than that of subjective well-being. Conclusion: Changes in health behavior and subjective well-being have long-term effects on the level of the other, the effect of the first being slightly stronger than vice versa. These mutual long-term benefits can be used as a motivator in health promotion on individual and societal levels. © 2022, The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2022. Vol. 20, no 1, article id 66
Keywords [en]
Follow-up, Health behavior, Health behavior change, Life satisfaction, Longitudinal, Subjective well-being, adult, alcohol consumption, article, cohort analysis, controlled study, diet, emotional well-being, female, Finn (citizen), follow up, habit, happiness, health promotion, human, loneliness, major clinical study, male, people by smoking status, physical activity, population health, smoking, social support
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Applied Psychology
Research subject
Research on Citizen Centered Health, University of Skövde (Reacch US)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-21118DOI: 10.1186/s12955-022-01972-4ISI: 000784563700002PubMedID: 35449057Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85128661254OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-21118DiVA, id: diva2:1656196
Note

CC BY 4.0

© The Author(s) 2022. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.

© 2022 BioMed Central Ltd unless otherwise stated. Part of Springer Nature.

Grants received from TYKS foundation (SSt), the Signe and Ane Gyllenberg foundation (SSt; HKH), the Waldemar von Frenckel foundation (SSt), the Päivikki and Sakari Sohlberg foundation (HKH), and the Yrjö Jahnsson foundation (SSt). The funding sources did not participate in the design or conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis or interpretation of the data; or preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript.

Available from: 2022-05-05 Created: 2022-05-05 Last updated: 2024-07-04Bibliographically approved

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Suominen, Sakari

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