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Nightmare Distress Questionnaire: associated factors
Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim/Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.
Psychology Department, University of Marburg, Germany.
University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment. Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, University of Turku, Finland. (Kognitiv neurovetenskap och filosofi, Consciousness and Cognitive Neuroscience)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5133-8664
Psychology Department, University of Marburg, Germany.
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2021 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine (JCSM), ISSN 1550-9389, E-ISSN 1550-9397, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 61-67Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

STUDY OBJECTIVES: The diagnosis of a nightmare disorder is based on clinically significant distress caused by the nightmares, eg, sleep or mood disturbances during the day. The question what factors might be associated with nightmare distress in addition to nightmares frequency is not well studied.

METHODS: Overall, 1,474 persons (893 women, 581 men) completed an online survey. Nightmare distress was measured with the Nightmare Distress Questionnaire.

RESULTS: The findings indicated that nightmare distress, measured by the Nightmare Distress Questionnaire, correlated with a variety of factors in addition to nightmare frequency: neuroticism, female sex, low education, extraversion, low agreeableness, and sensation seeking. Moreover, the percentage of replicative trauma-related nightmares was also associated with higher nightmare distress.

CONCLUSIONS: A large variety of factors are associated with nightmare distress, a finding that is of clinical importance. The construct harm avoidance, however, was not helpful in explaining interindividual differences in nightmare distress. Furthermore, the relationship between nightmare distress and other factors, eg, education or agreeableness, is not yet understood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Academy of Sleep Medicine , 2021. Vol. 17, no 1, p. 61-67
Keywords [en]
agreeableness, harm avoidance, neuroticism, nightmare distress, nightmare frequency, openness to experience, sensation seeking
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Consciousness and Cognitive Neuroscience
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-19385DOI: 10.5664/jcsm.8824ISI: 000660321700009PubMedID: 32964832Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85099326387OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-19385DiVA, id: diva2:1517456
Note

©2021 Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine

Available from: 2021-01-14 Created: 2021-01-14 Last updated: 2021-07-02Bibliographically approved

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Valli, Katja

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