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Assessing Pain Responses During General Anesthesia
University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
2001 (English)In: AANA journal, ISSN 0094-6354, Vol. 63, no 3, 218-222 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Major technical and pharmacological achievements in recent years have greatly influenced the practice of anesthesia. Clinical signs related to the main aspects of anesthesia, i.e., hypnosis, analgesia, and muscular relaxation, are increasingly obtainable from variables supplied by the monitoring equipment. It is not known, however, to what extent more indirect, patient-associated clinical signs of pain/depth of anesthesia are still considered of importance and relied on in the intraoperative management of surgical patients. The aims of the present study were to assess what clinical signs, indirect as well as monitor-derived, are considered indicative of intraoperative pain or depth of anesthesia by nurse anesthetists during general anesthesia. In connection with anesthetic management of surgical patients, Swedish nurse anesthetists (N = 40) were interviewed about clinical signs that they routinely assessed and were asked if the observed signs were considered indicative mainly of intraoperative pain or depth of anesthesia. It was found that skin-associated responses (temperature, color, moisture/stickiness) were commonly considered to indicate intraoperative pain rather than depth of anesthesia. Respiratory movements, eye reactions, and circulatory responses were considered to be indicative of either pain or insufficient depth of anesthesia. The present data indicate that indirect physiological signs are still considered of major importance by anesthesia nurses during the anesthetic management of surgical patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AANA , 2001. Vol. 63, no 3, 218-222 p.
Keyword [en]
Awareness, depth of anesthesia, general anesthesia, pain, physiological response
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-2613OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-2613DiVA: diva2:139786
Available from: 2009-01-26 Created: 2009-01-26 Last updated: 2010-04-01

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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