his.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Dream affect: Conceptual and Methodological Issues in the Study of Emotions and Moods Experienced in Dreams
University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment. Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. (Kognitiv neurovetenskap och filosofi, Consciousness and Cognitive Neuroscience)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1926-6138
2020 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

We experience affect—emotions and mood—not only when we are awake but alsoduring dreaming. Despite considerable research, existing theories and empiricalfindings disagree about the frequency, nature, and correlates of dream affect. In thisthesis, I discuss the conceptual and methodological issues that underlie thesediscrepancies. I present five empirical studies, the overall aim of which was toinvestigate the phenomenology and correlates of dream affect and how resultsregarding these are influenced by study methodology. Studies I–III focusedspecifically on methodological issues, by comparing self- and external ratings ofdream affect (Studies I–II) or the affective content of home and laboratory dreamreports (Study III). Studies IV and V investigated the waking well-being and neuralcorrelates of dream affect, respectively. These studies show that results andconclusions regarding dream affect are very different, even contradictory, dependingon whether dream reports have been collected using sleep laboratory awakenings orhome dream diaries (Study III) or whether dream affect has been measured usingself- or external ratings (Studies I–II). Self- and external ratings of dream affect arealso differently correlated with waking well-being (Study IV). Together, theseresults caution against making broad generalizations about affective dreamexperiences from findings obtained with one type of methodology only. The studiesalso demonstrate that dream affect is related to aspects of waking well-being and illbeing(Study IV) and that certain affective states experienced in dreams, specificallyanger, rely on similar neural processes as in wakefulness (Study V). These findingssuggest that the phenomenology and neural correlates of affective experiences are,at least to some extent, continuous across sleep and wakefulness. Overall, this thesisshows how the conceptual and methodological issues in the study of dream affectmay limit the validity, generalizability, and replicability of findings and,consequently, pose challenges to theory building and theory testing. It contributes todream research by highlighting the need, and suggesting ways, to enhance theconceptual clarity and methodological rigour of research on dream affect. Due to theinterdisciplinary nature of the thesis, the theoretical discussion and novel empiricalfindings also have implications for emotion research, sleep research, well-beingresearch, consciousness research, and affective neuroscience.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Turku, Finland: University of Turku , 2020. , p. 136
Series
Annales Universitatis Turkuensis, ISSN 0082-6987, E-ISSN 2343-3191 ; 506
Keywords [en]
dreaming, affect, emotions, self-ratings, external ratings, REM sleep, well-being, peace of mind, frontal alpha asymmetry
National Category
Natural Sciences Psychology
Research subject
Consciousness and Cognitive Neuroscience
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-18210ISBN: 978-951-29-7938-7 (print)ISBN: 978-951-29-7939-4 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-18210DiVA, id: diva2:1394396
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2020-02-21 Created: 2020-02-18 Last updated: 2020-03-20Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(4084 kB)83 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 4084 kBChecksum SHA-512
dcc65f883f0e1fd2c060f2a8911503aa959cd141704e366740d840e9a96b39252400e8f67074753f8dc0bdb642d3f1212275014f0e1d718a81d813f4d0cb58cf
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Full text

Authority records BETA

Sikka, Pilleriin

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Sikka, Pilleriin
By organisation
School of BioscienceSystems Biology Research Environment
Natural SciencesPsychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 83 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 224 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf