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Children of Divorce: Long-Term Psychological Effects and Neurological Consequences
University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
2019 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

This thesis has examined what long-term psychological and neurological effects that are apparent in children and adults who have experienced parental divorce. It was predicted that significantly more children and adult children from divorced families would have increased symptoms of mental disorders than children and adult children from married homes e.g., anxiety, depression, panic disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder. It was further predicted that parental divorce would negatively affect the neurological system in the offspring. The correlation between children of divorce and negative neurological effects was not found to be true. However, adult children of divorce have significantly lower baseline cortisol levels compared to adult children of marriage. Dysregulated cortisol levels are highly associated with the development of e.g., anxiety, depression, and brain damage. Parental divorce did not only influence how secretion of the hormone cortisol is regulated within adult children of divorce, but how both children and adult children of divorce psychologically adapt postdivorce. Children of divorce have for instance lower general well-being, more symptoms of anxiety and depression, lower self-esteem, and feel more stress than children of marriage. Adult children of divorce are more likely to experience marital discord, getting divorced themselves, anxiety and depression, lower academic performance, and substance abuse, etc. The result of the thesis suggests that children and adult children from divorced families are negatively affected, both psychologically and neurologically, regardless of age. Parental divorce and supplementary effects make it more likely for children and adult children to experience more symptoms of mental disorders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. , p. 51
Keywords [en]
Children of divorce, Long-term effects, Affective disorders, Cortisol, Adult children of divorce
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Other Medical Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-17660OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-17660DiVA, id: diva2:1349746
Subject / course
Cognitive Neuroscience
Educational program
Psychological Coach
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2019-09-10 Created: 2019-09-09 Last updated: 2019-09-10Bibliographically approved

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Children of Divorce(585 kB)61 downloads
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Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf