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Cognitive Distortions as Trauma-Specific Irrational Beliefs Among Burn Patients
Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.
Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.
University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. (Individ och samhälle (VIDSOC), Individual and Society)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1943-8216
Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 361-367Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Burn injuries are most certainly stressful events, particularly when permanent disfigurement is a result. This situation can lead to the onset of irrational beliefs which can in turn lead to long-term psychological problems such as depression, anxiety, shame, guilt, posttraumatic stress, etc. The objective of this study is to explore the irrational beliefs among burn patients and its correlates in an Iranian sample. This cross-sectional study included 329 patients who had experienced disfigurement, as result of burn injuries. In order to assess irrational beliefs, a Scale for Irrational Thoughts after Burning was used. To identify correlated variables with irrational beliefs, both bivariate and multivariate analysis methods were conducted. In multivariate linear regression, forward strategy was used for building the model. The results of bivariate analysis showed that the location of the burn on bodies (body parts generally exposed in social environment or parts culturally perceived as sensitive areas of body), marital status, urbanities, age group, geographical areas, etiology of burning, and intent of injury had significant relationships with irrational beliefs (P < .05). Using forward linear regression, gender, marital status, geographical areas, etiology of burning, body burn by location (body parts generally exposed in social environment or parts culturally perceived as sensitive areas of body), and intent of injury had significant correlation with irrational beliefs. The models predicted 15.5% (P < .001) of irrational beliefs. Considering to irrational beliefs and development of facilities for screening is necessary. Moreover, consultation with mental health experts after burn injuries is highly recommended. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019. Vol. 40, no 3, p. 361-367
Keywords [en]
burns, depressive disorders, burning sensation
National Category
Psychiatry
Research subject
Individual and Society VIDSOC
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-17239DOI: 10.1093/jbcr/irz026ISI: 000490449100016PubMedID: 31222273Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85066788231OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-17239DiVA, id: diva2:1328319
Available from: 2019-06-20 Created: 2019-06-20 Last updated: 2019-10-31Bibliographically approved

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