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Social contents in dreams: An empirical test of the Social Simulation Theory
Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Finland / Turku Brain and Mind Center, University of Turku, Finland.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3892-3199
Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Finland.
University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Finland / Turku Brain and Mind Center, University of Turku, Finland. (Kognitiv neurovetenskap och filosofi, Consciousness and Cognitive Neuroscience)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2771-1588
University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Finland / Turku Brain and Mind Center, University of Turku, Finland. (Kognitiv neurovetenskap och filosofi, Consciousness and Cognitive Neuroscience)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5133-8664
2019 (English)In: Consciousness and Cognition, ISSN 1053-8100, E-ISSN 1090-2376, Vol. 69, p. 133-145Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Social Simulation Theory (SST) considers the function of dreaming to be the simulation of social events. The Sociality Bias and the Strengthening hypotheses of SST were tested. Social Content Scale (SCS) was developed to quantify social events. Additionally, we attempted to replicate a previous finding (McNamara et al., 2005, Psychological Science) of REM dreams as predisposed to aggressive, and NREM dreams to prosocial interactions. Further, we investigated the frequency and quality of interactions in late vs early REM and NREM dreams. Data consisted of wake, REM and NREM home dream reports (N = 232, 116, 116, respectively) from 15 students. Dreams overrepresented social events compared to wake reports, supporting the Sociality Bias hypothesis. However, the Strengthening Hypothesis was not supported. We weren't able to replicate the McNamara et al. finding, and no time of night effect was found. While SST gained partial support, further research on social contents in dreams is required. © 2019 Elsevier Inc.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 69, p. 133-145
Keywords [en]
Continuity hypothesis, Dreaming, Functions of dreaming, NREM sleep, REM sleep, Social simulation theory, Sleep, Social Cognition
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Consciousness and Cognitive Neuroscience
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-16654DOI: 10.1016/j.concog.2019.01.017ISI: 000460197200011PubMedID: 30769273Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85061351162OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-16654DiVA, id: diva2:1291040
Available from: 2019-02-22 Created: 2019-02-22 Last updated: 2019-05-09Bibliographically approved

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Revonsuo, AnttiValli, Katja

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