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Social status as one key indicator of successful psychopathy: An initial empirical investigation
University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Finland. (Kognitiv neurovetenskap och filosofi, Consciousness and Cognitive Neuroscience)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9890-5788
Department of Psychology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States of America / School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
2019 (English)In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 141, p. 209-217Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Psychopathy is a personality disorder that researchers have subdivided into two types: successful and unsuccessful. Nevertheless, little headway has been made regarding how to conceptualize and operationalize success. We consider various accounts of success from the existing literature and make the case for a two-dimensional view of successful psychopathy. Specifically, we contend that successful psychopathy can be conceptualized with two conditions in mind: (a) high social status and (b) lack of serious antisocial behavior. We emphasize that high social status, best described using socioeconomic status (SES), has been largely overlooked in the literature. We tested this idea using a sample of 591 participants who received measures of the triarchic model of psychopathy (i.e., boldness, meanness, and disinhibition), SES, and personality dysfunction. The results demonstrated that, as predicted, the putatively adaptive features of psychopathy (i.e., boldness) were positively related to SES and personality functioning. In contrast, the putatively maladaptive psychopathy features disinhibition and meanness were negatively related to personality functioning, and disinhibition was negatively related to SES. The relevance of boldness to psychopathy and the benefits of conceptualizing success as a continuous variable are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 141, p. 209-217
Keywords [en]
Successful psychopathy, Triarchic model of psychopathy, Socioeconomic status, Personality dysfunction
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Consciousness and Cognitive Neuroscience
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-16572DOI: 10.1016/j.paid.2019.01.020ISI: 000458939900035Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85059964956OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-16572DiVA, id: diva2:1280050
Available from: 2019-01-17 Created: 2019-01-17 Last updated: 2019-05-09Bibliographically approved

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Persson, Björn

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