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Genes involved in inflammation are within celiac disease risk loci show differential mRNA expression
University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
2018 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic autoimmune disease, caused by the consumption of gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Celiac patients develop many clinical features include; weight loss, diarrhea, and Intestinal damage, and if left untreated, CD patient may face an increased risk of malignancies.

Materials and methods403 patient were admitted to the study. These patients were divided into three groups; celiac cases, controls, and latent celiac cases. Gene expression analysis was performed for intestinal biopsies and blood samples (leukocytes) using a quantitative PCR technique. The second section of the study was studying the effect of PRODH enzyme on Drosophila Melanogaster intestines. To achieve that PRODH enzyme and different amino acids were added to the fly food.  One way ANOVA and Wilcoxon tests were applied to find out the significant genes.

ResultsMost of the differentially expressed genes in celiac disease are involved in the inflammatory response. However, many genes have significantly altered expression in the latent celiac group but not altered significantly in CD group. These genes are CXCL1, IL15RA, IL2RB, MAPK11, and TGM2. They are involved in the TNF signaling pathway and in inflammatory cytokines. It was noticed that in celiac disease there is a significant alteration in PRODH expression in the intestines, and the addition of PRODH enzyme to glutamine has a similar effect on the intestinal gene expression as gluten does.

ConclusionWe can conclude that Non-HLA genes are important in activating the immune system, increasing proline level, and developing the clinical features of celiac disease. Secondly,  Proline metabolism has an important role in tumor suppression and in augmenting tumor growth, which makes it an important therapeutic target in tumor therapy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. , p. 58
National Category
Bioinformatics and Systems Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-16292OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-16292DiVA, id: diva2:1255174
Subject / course
Systems Biology
Educational program
Tumor Biology - Master’s Programme
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2018-10-15 Created: 2018-10-11 Last updated: 2018-10-15Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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