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Stress, emotional eating behaviour and dietary patterns in children
Univ Ghent, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3069-7254
Univ Ghent, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.;Res Fdn Flanders, B-1000 Brussels, Belgium.
Univ Ghent, Dept Dev Personal & Social Psychol, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4397-3721
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2012 (English)In: Appetite, ISSN 0195-6663, E-ISSN 1095-8304, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 762-769Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Psychological stress has been suggested to change dietary pattern towards more unhealthy choices and as such to contribute to overweight. Emotional eating behaviour could be an underlying mediating mechanism. The interrelationship between stress, emotional eating behaviour and dietary patterns has only rarely been examined in young children. Nevertheless, research in children is pivotal as the foundations of dietary habits are established starting from childhood and may track into adulthood. In 437 children (5-12 years) of the ChiBS study, stress was measured by questionnaires on stressful events, emotions (happy, angry, sad, anxious) and problems (emotional, peer, conduct and hyperactivity). Data were collected on children's emotional eating behaviour and also on dietary patterns: frequency of fatty foods, sweet foods, snacks (fat and sweet), fruit and vegetables. Stressful events, negative emotions and problems were positively associated with emotional eating. Positive associations were observed between problems and both sweet and fatty foods consumption. Negative associations were observed between events and fruit and vegetables consumption. Overall, stress was associated with emotional eating and a more unhealthy dietary pattern and could thus contribute to the development of overweight, also in children. Nevertheless, emotional eating behaviour was not observed to mediate the stress-diet relation. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD , 2012. Vol. 59, no 3, p. 762-769
Keywords [en]
Children, Stress, Diet, Eating behaviour, Emotional eating
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14461DOI: 10.1016/j.appet.2012.08.010ISI: 000311134900019PubMedID: 22918173Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84865961599OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-14461DiVA, id: diva2:1157801
Available from: 2017-11-16 Created: 2017-11-16 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved

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Michels, NathalieEiben, GabrieleVyncke, Krishna

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