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Migrant Background and Weight Gain in Early Infancy: Results from the German Study Sample of the IDEFICS Study
Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany.;Univ Bielefeld, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol & Int Publ Hlth, D-33615 Bielefeld, Germany.
Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany.;Univ Bremen, Inst Publ Hlth & Nursing Res, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5623-8160
Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4397-3721
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2013 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 4, article id e60648Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To examine variations in infant weight gain between children of parents with and without migrant background and to investigate how these differences are explained by pre- and perinatal factors. Methods: We used data on birth weight and weight at six months from well-child check-up books that were collected from a population-based German sample of children in the IDEFICS study (n = 1,287). We calculated unadjusted and adjusted means for weight z-scores at birth and six months later. We applied linear regression for change in weight z-score and we calculated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for rapid weight gain by logistic regression, adjusted for biological, social and behavioural factors. Results: Weight z-scores for migrants and Germans differed slightly at birth, but were markedly increased for Turkish and Eastern European infants at age six months. Turkish infants showed the highest change in weight z-score during the first 6 months (beta = 0.35; 95% CI 0.14-0.56) and an increased probability of rapid weight gain compared with German infants. Examination of the joint effect of migrant and socioeconomic status (SES) showed the greatest change in weight z-scores in Turkish infants from middle SES families (beta = 0.77; 95% CI 0.40-1.14) and infants of parents from Eastern European countries with high SES (beta = 0.72; 95% CI 0.13-1.32). Conclusions: Our results support the hypothesis that migrant background is an independent risk factor for infant weight gain and suggest that the onset of health inequalities in overweight starts in early infancy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 8, no 4, article id e60648
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
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URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14454DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0060648ISI: 000319108100061PubMedID: 23593270Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84875920972OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-14454DiVA, id: diva2:1157760
Available from: 2017-11-16 Created: 2017-11-16 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved

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Bammann, KarinEiben, GabrieleAhrens, Wolfgang

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