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Association of Self-Perceived Physical Competence and Leisure-Time Physical Activity in Childhood: A Follow-Up Study
Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
Paavo Nurmi Centre & Department of Physical Activity and Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
Children and Adolescents Out-patient Clinic, Turku, Finland / Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland.
Department of Teacher Education, University of Turku, Finland.
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2017 (English)In: Journal of School Health, ISSN 0022-4391, E-ISSN 1746-1561, Vol. 87, no 4, 236-243 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUNDThe basis of self-perceived physical competence is built in childhood and school personnel have an important role in this developmental process. We investigated the association between initial self-perceived physical competence and reported leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) longitudinally in 10-, 12-, and 15-year-old children.

METHODSThis longitudinal follow-up study comprises pupils from an elementary school cohort (N = 1346) in the city of Turku, Finland (175,000 inhabitants). The self-perceived physical competence (fitness and appearance) and LTPA data were collected with questionnaires. The full longitudinal data were available from 571 pupils based on repeated studies at the ages of 10, 12, and 15 years in 2004, 2006, and 2010. We analyzed the association of self-perceived physical competence and LTPA using regression models.

RESULTSSelf-perceived physical competence was positively associated with LTPA at all ages (10 years p < .05, 12 years p < .0001, 15 years p < .0001). Increase in the self-perceived physical fitness scores was likely to associate with higher LTPA at each age point (10 years [odds ratio, OR] = 1.18, 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.09-1.27; 12 years [OR] = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.18-1.37; and 15 years [OR] = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.19-1.38).

CONCLUSIONSSelf-perceived physical competence is associated with LTPA in children and adolescents, and the association is strengthened with age.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017. Vol. 87, no 4, 236-243 p.
Keyword [en]
children, leisure-time physical activity, self-perceived physical competence, follow-up study
National Category
Health Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Individual and Society VIDSOC
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-13499DOI: 10.1111/josh.12490ISI: 000395424600002PubMedID: 28260241Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85014490486OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-13499DiVA: diva2:1089129
Available from: 2017-04-18 Created: 2017-04-18 Last updated: 2017-09-12Bibliographically approved

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Suominen, Sakari

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