Högskolan i Skövde

his.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • apa-cv
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Proteome of Personalized Tissue-Engineered Veins
University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment. (Translational Bioinformatics)
VERIGRAFT, Gothenburg, Sweden.
VERIGRAFT, Gothenburg, Sweden.
University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment. (Translational Bioinformatics)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9242-4852
Show others and affiliations
2024 (English)In: ACS Omega, E-ISSN 2470-1343, Vol. 9, no 13, p. 14805-14817Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Vascular diseases are the largest cause of death globally and impose a major global burden on healthcare. The gold standard for treating vascular diseases is the transplantation of autologous veins, if applicable. Alternative treatments still suffer from shortcomings, including low patency, lack of growth potential, the need for repeated intervention, and a substantial risk of developing infections. The use of a vascular ECM scaffold reconditioned with the patient's own cells has shown successful results in preclinical and clinical studies. In this study, we have compared the proteomes of personalized tissue-engineered veins of humans and pigs. By applying tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling LC/MS-MS, we have investigated the proteome of decellularized (DC) veins from humans and pigs and reconditioned (RC) DC veins produced through perfusion with the patient's whole blood in STEEN solution, applying the same technology as used in the preclinical studies. The results revealed high similarity between the proteomes of human and pig DC and RC veins, including the ECM texture after decellularization and reconditioning. In addition, functional enrichment analysis showed similarities in signaling pathways and biological processes involved in the immune system response. Furthermore, the classification of proteins involved in immune response activity that were detected in human and pig RC veins revealed proteins that evoke immunogenic responses, which may lead to graft rejection, thrombosis, and inflammation. However, the results from this study imply the initiation of wound healing rather than an immunogenic response, as both systems share the same processes, and no immunogenic response was reported in the preclinical and clinical studies. Finally, our study assessed the application of STEEN solution in tissue engineering and identified proteins that may be useful for the prediction of successful transplantations. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2024. Vol. 9, no 13, p. 14805-14817
National Category
Bioinformatics and Systems Biology Medical Biotechnology Immunology in the medical area
Research subject
Bioinformatics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-23682DOI: 10.1021/acsomega.3c07098ISI: 001189129300001PubMedID: 38585136Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85188351102OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-23682DiVA, id: diva2:1847573
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 2018/0125
Note

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 DEED

© 2024 The Authors. Published by American Chemical Society.

Correspondence Address: N. Ghosheh; Systems Biology Research Center, School of Bioscience, University of Skövde, Skövde, SE-541 28, Sweden; email: nidal.ghosheh@his.se

The study was supported by VERIGRAFT AB (Gothenburg, Sweden), XVIVO Perfusion AB (Gothenburg, Sweden), and the University of Skövde under a grant from the Knowledge Foundation [2018/0125]. The authors appreciate the Proteogenomics unit at SciLifeLab (Solna, Sweden) and Georgios Mermelekas for the proteomics service. The authors also appreciate the scientific advice from Anne-Li Sigvardsson and the laboratory support from Carina Ström.

Available from: 2024-03-28 Created: 2024-03-28 Last updated: 2024-04-30Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(12109 kB)56 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 12109 kBChecksum SHA-512
236b0877b646fb0067c699b19eff372b2187f47a2403b3b0a515b7b86b0794abc5e1d1a08c202a4d806ada1e992f1b1914ad16e5832246481b72a5979925bb80
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records

Ulfenborg, BenjaminSynnergren, JaneGhosheh, Nidal

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Ulfenborg, BenjaminSynnergren, JaneGhosheh, Nidal
By organisation
School of BioscienceSystems Biology Research Environment
In the same journal
ACS Omega
Bioinformatics and Systems BiologyMedical BiotechnologyImmunology in the medical area

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 57 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 40 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • apa-cv
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf