his.sePublications
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Association of Healthy Lifestyle with Years Lived without Major Chronic Diseases
Clinicum, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, United Kingdom / Inserm U1153, Epidemiology of Ageing and Neurodegenrative Diseases, Paris, France.
Clinicum, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland / Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku University Hospital, Finland / Centre for Population Health Research, University of Turku, Turku University Hospital, Finland.
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Show others and affiliations
2020 (English)In: JAMA Internal Medicine, ISSN 2168-6106, E-ISSN 2168-6114, Vol. 180, no 5, p. 760-768Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Importance: It is well established that selected lifestyle factors are individually associated with lower risk of chronic diseases, but how combinations of these factors are associated with disease-free life-years is unknown. Objective: To estimate the association between healthy lifestyle and the number of disease-free life-years. Design, Setting, and Participants: A prospective multicohort study, including 12 European studies as part of the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations Consortium, was performed. Participants included 116043 people free of major noncommunicable disease at baseline from August 7, 1991, to May 31, 2006. Data analysis was conducted from May 22, 2018, to January 21, 2020. Exposures: Four baseline lifestyle factors (smoking, body mass index, physical activity, and alcohol consumption) were each allocated a score based on risk status: Optimal (2 points), intermediate (1 point), or poor (0 points) resulting in an aggregated lifestyle score ranging from 0 (worst) to 8 (best). Sixteen lifestyle profiles were constructed from combinations of these risk factors. Main Outcomes and Measures: The number of years between ages 40 and 75 years without chronic disease, including type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, cancer, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Results: Of the 116043 people included in the analysis, the mean (SD) age was 43.7 (10.1) years and 70911 were women (61.1%). During 1.45 million person-years at risk (mean follow-up, 12.5 years; range, 4.9-18.6 years), 17383 participants developed at least 1 chronic disease. There was a linear association between overall healthy lifestyle score and the number of disease-free years, such that a 1-point improvement in the score was associated with an increase of 0.96 (95% CI, 0.83-1.08) disease-free years in men and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.75-1.02) years in women. Comparing the best lifestyle score with the worst lifestyle score was associated with 9.9 (95% CI 6.7-13.1) additional years without chronic diseases in men and 9.4 (95% CI 5.4-13.3) additional years in women (P <.001 for dose-response). All of the 4 lifestyle profiles that were associated with the highest number of disease-free years included a body-mass index less than 25 (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) and at least 2 of the following factors: Never smoking, physical activity, and moderate alcohol consumption. Participants with 1 of these lifestyle profiles reached age 70.3 (95% CI, 69.9-70.8) to 71.4 (95% CI, 70.9-72.0) years disease free depending on the profile and sex. Conclusions and Relevance: In this multicohort analysis, various healthy lifestyle profiles appeared to be associated with gains in life-years without major chronic diseases. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Medical Association , 2020. Vol. 180, no 5, p. 760-768
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Individual and Society VIDSOC
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-18404DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2020.0618PubMedID: 32250383Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85083251732OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-18404DiVA, id: diva2:1426139
Available from: 2020-04-23 Created: 2020-04-23 Last updated: 2020-05-20Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(241 kB)1 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT02.pdfFile size 241 kBChecksum SHA-512
596dbc0585a3fae602ab6b2dc0ae3fdc7f83968c6313b3efc74e3b0f41164d491f2a1c36b56f569bf0485d53cb7d0917d541ec31adf75390357f8515417fed14
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Suominen, Sakari

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Suominen, Sakari
By organisation
School of Health SciencesDigital Health Research (DHEAR)
In the same journal
JAMA Internal Medicine
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 8 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 23 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf