his.sePublications
3435363738394037 of 46
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The Subjective Experience of Anxiety and Its Relation to Performance
University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
2019 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

There have been many attempts to explain the experience of anxiety during different types of performance situations. There are several different views on the brain mechanisms of anxiety. The traditional view has its focus on amygdala but recent research questions this view. In this essay the focus is on how two recent theories, namely the two-system model (LeDoux & Pine, 2016) and the attentional control theory (Eysenck, Derakshan, Santos & Calvo, 2007) has changed the theoretical landscape of the brain mechanisms behind the experience of anxiety. The two-system framework model claim that the subjective experience of anxiety uses the same cortical circuits as executive functions involved in attention and working memory. Whereas the attentional control theory argues, that due to the limited attentional capacity, increasing the subjective experience of anxiety would result in less capacity for executive functions involved in working memory and attention resulting in impaired performance. This review shows that research on the relationship between the subjective experience of anxiety and performance is inconsistent and researchers possess different views on what gives rise to the experience. Some data indicate that the amygdala is crucial for the subjective experience of anxiety while other data suggest that other cortical circuits have a much more prominent role. If the cortical circuits are strongly involved in the subjective experience of anxiety, this would be strong support for the attentional control theory and the two-system framework model.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. , p. 44
Keywords [en]
Anxiety, The Subjective Experience of Anxiety, Amygdala, Attention, Working Memory, Performance
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-17876OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-17876DiVA, id: diva2:1369663
Subject / course
Cognitive Neuroscience
Educational program
Cognitive Neuroscience - Applied Positive Psychology
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2019-11-13 Created: 2019-11-12 Last updated: 2019-11-13Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(522 kB)17 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 522 kBChecksum SHA-512
91614cc9087684f9d14bd04a58dd30d25270a879451471b06467fe9c0c29ad6ceab5bc8db56f84bdd8ec98a059b1d2178f7dd203e16e7ee19c27252bc58900e5
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

By organisation
School of Bioscience
Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 17 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 53 hits
3435363738394037 of 46
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf