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Monitoring of seasonality of norovirus and other enteric viruses in Cameroon by real-time PCR: an exploratory study
Department of Infectious Diseases/Section of Clinical Virology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Department of Infectious Diseases/Section of Clinical Virology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. (Infektionsbiologi, Infection Biology)
Camyaids Institute of Laboratory Diagnosis and Clinical Research, Douala, Cameroon.
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2014 (English)In: Epidemiology and Infection, ISSN 0950-2688, E-ISSN 1469-4409, Vol. 142, no 7, p. 1393-1402Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We studied the seasonal fluctuation of norovirus and other enteric viruses in Cameroon. Two hundred participants aged between 1 and 69 years were prospectively followed up. Each participant provided monthly faecal samples over a 12-month period. A total of 2484 samples were tested using multiplex real-time PCR assay for the detection of norovirus, rotavirus and enterovirus. The effect of weather variables and risk factors were analysed by Pearson correlation and bivariate analysis. Overall, enterovirus was the most commonly detected virus (216% of specimens), followed by norovirus (39%) and rotavirus (04%). Norovirus and enterovirus were detected throughout the year with a peak of norovirus detection at the beginning of the rainy season and a significant alternation of circulation of norovirus genogroups from one month to the next. Age <5 years and consumption of tap water were risk factors for norovirus infection. Better understanding of factors influencing transmission and seasonality may provide insights into the relationship between physical environment and risk of infection for these viruses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 142, no 7, p. 1393-1402
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Infectious Medicine Pediatrics
Research subject
Infection Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-16618DOI: 10.1017/S095026881300232XISI: 000337306100007PubMedID: 24047516Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84901423355OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-16618DiVA, id: diva2:1287377
Available from: 2019-02-11 Created: 2019-02-11 Last updated: 2019-02-14Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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