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What we need from an embodied cognitive architecture
University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. University of Plymouth, United Kingdom. (Interaction Lab)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1177-4119
2019 (English)In: Cognitive Architectures / [ed] Maria Isabel Aldinhas Ferreira, João Silva Sequeira, Rodrigo Ventura, Cham: Springer, 2019, p. 43-57Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Given that original purpose of cognitive architectures was to lead to a unified theory of cognition, this chapter considers the possible contributions that cognitive architectures can make to embodied theories of cognition in particular. This is not a trivial question since the field remains very much divided about what embodied cognition actually means, and we will see some example positions in this chapter. It is then argued that a useful embodied cognitive architecture would be one that can demonstrate (a) what precisely the role of the body in cognition actually is, and (b) whether a body is constitutively needed at all for some (or all) cognitive processes. It is proposed that such questions can be investigated if the cognitive architecture is designed so that consequences of varying the precise embodiment on higher cognitive mechanisms can be explored. This is in contrast with, for example, those cognitive architectures in robotics that are designed for specific bodies first; or architectures in cognitive science that implement embodiment as an add-on to an existing framework (because then, that framework is by definition not constitutively shaped by the embodiment). The chapter concludes that the so-called semantic pointer architecture by Eliasmith and colleagues may be one framework that satisfies our desiderata and may be well-suited for studying theories of embodied cognition further.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2019. p. 43-57
Series
Intelligent Systems, Control and Automation: Science and Engineering, ISSN 2213-8986, E-ISSN 2213-8994 ; 94
National Category
Computer Vision and Robotics (Autonomous Systems)
Research subject
Interaction Lab (ILAB); INF302 Autonomous Intelligent Systems
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-16167DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-97550-4_4ISI: 000465469800005Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85051464325ISBN: 978-3-319-97549-8 (print)ISBN: 978-3-319-97550-4 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-16167DiVA, id: diva2:1246440
Available from: 2018-09-07 Created: 2018-09-07 Last updated: 2019-06-11Bibliographically approved

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Thill, Serge

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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