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Behavioral Health Risk Profiles of Undergraduate University Students in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland: A Cluster Analysis
University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar / University of Gloucestershire, Gloucester, United Kingdom / Qatar University, Doha, Qatar. (Individ och samhälle, Individual and Society - VIDSOC)
Utrecht University, Netherlands.
University of Southern Denmark, Esbjerg, Denmark.
2018 (English)In: Frontiers In Public Health, ISSN 2296-2565, Vol. 6, article id 120Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Limited research has explored clustering of lifestyle behavioral risk factors (BRFs) among university students. This study aimed to explore clustering of BRFs, composition of clusters, and the association of the clusters with self-rated health and perceived academic performance. Method: We assessed (BRFs), namely tobacco smoking, physical inactivity, alcohol consumption, illicit drug use, unhealthy nutrition, and inadequate sleep, using a self-administered general Student Health Survey among 3,706 undergraduates at seven UK universities. Results: A two-step cluster analysis generated: Cluster 1 (the high physically active and health conscious) with very high health awareness/consciousness, good nutrition, and physical activity (PA), and relatively low alcohol, tobacco, and other drug (ATOD) use. Cluster 2 (the abstinent) had very low ATOD use, high health awareness, good nutrition, and medium high PA. Cluster 3 (the moderately health conscious) included the highest regard for healthy eating, second highest fruit/vegetable consumption, and moderately high ATOD use. Cluster 4 (the risk taking) showed the highest ATOD use, were the least health conscious, least fruit consuming, and attached the least importance on eating healthy. Compared to the healthy cluster (Cluster 1), students in other clusters had lower self-rated health, and particularly, students in the risk taking cluster (Cluster 4) reported lower academic performance. These associations were stronger for men than for women. Of the four clusters, Cluster 4 had the youngest students. Conclusion: Our results suggested that prevention among university students should address multiple BRFs simultaneously, with particular focus on the younger students.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Research Foundation , 2018. Vol. 6, article id 120
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Individual and Society VIDSOC
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-15943DOI: 10.3389/fpubh.2018.00120ISI: 000435151200001PubMedID: 29868535OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-15943DiVA, id: diva2:1231651
Available from: 2018-07-09 Created: 2018-07-09 Last updated: 2019-11-19Bibliographically approved

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El Ansari, Walid

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