his.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Gustafson, Deborah R.
Publications (10 of 10) Show all publications
Sánchez, S. M., Duarte-Abritta, B., Abulafia, C., De Pino, G., Bocaccio, H., Castro, M. N., . . . Villarreal, M. F. (2020). White matter fiber density abnormalities in cognitively normal adults at risk for late-onset Alzheimer´s disease. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 122, 79-87
Open this publication in new window or tab >>White matter fiber density abnormalities in cognitively normal adults at risk for late-onset Alzheimer´s disease
Show others...
2020 (English)In: Journal of Psychiatric Research, ISSN 0022-3956, E-ISSN 1879-1379, Vol. 122, p. 79-87Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Tau accumulation affecting white matter tracts is an early neuropathological feature of late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD). There is a need to ascertain methods for the detection of early LOAD features to help with disease prevention efforts. The microstructure of these tracts and anatomical brain connectivity can be assessed by analyzing diffusion MRI (dMRI) data. Considering that family history increases the risk of developing LOAD, we explored the microstructure of white matter through dMRI in 23 cognitively normal adults who are offspring of patients with Late-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease (O-LOAD) and 22 control subjects (CS) without family history of AD. We also evaluated the relation of white matter microstructure metrics with cortical thickness, volumetry, in vivo amyloid deposition (with the help of PiB positron emission tomography -PiB-PET) and regional brain metabolism (as FDG-PET) measures. Finally we studied the association between cognitive performance and white matter microstructure metrics. O-LOAD exhibited lower fiber density and fractional anisotropy in the posterior portion of the corpus callosum and right fornix when compared to CS. Among O-LOAD, reduced fiber density was associated with lower amyloid deposition in the right hippocampus, and greater cortical thickness in the left precuneus, while higher mean diffusivity was related with greater cortical thickness of the right superior temporal gyrus. Additionally, compromised white matter microstructure was associated with poorer semantic fluency. In conclusion, white matter microstructure metrics may reveal early differences in O-LOAD by virtue of parental history of the disorder, when compared to CS without a family history of LOAD. We demonstrate that these differences are associated with lower fiber density in the posterior portion of the corpus callosum and the right fornix.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Diffusion MRI, white matter microstructure, preclinical late-onset Alzheimer’s disease, amyloid deposition, cognitive tests, corpus callosum
National Category
Neurosciences Neurology Psychiatry
Research subject
Individual and Society VIDSOC
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-18079 (URN)10.1016/j.jpsychires.2019.12.019 (DOI)2-s2.0-85077658603 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-01-10 Created: 2020-01-10 Last updated: 2020-01-23Bibliographically approved
Gustafson, D. R. (2019). Adipose Tissue Complexities in Dyslipidemias. In: Samy I. McFarlane (Ed.), Dyslipidemia: (pp. 1-22). London: IntechOpen
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adipose Tissue Complexities in Dyslipidemias
2019 (English)In: Dyslipidemia / [ed] Samy I. McFarlane, London: IntechOpen , 2019, p. 1-22Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Adipose tissue is the largest organ in the human body and, in excess, contributes to dyslipidemias and the dysregulation of other vascular and metabolic processes. Adipose tissue is heterogeneous, comprised of several cell types based on morphology, cellular age, and endocrine and paracrine function. Adipose tissue depots are also regional, primarily due to sex differences and genetic variation. Adipose tissue is also characterized as subcutaneous vs. visceral. In addition, fatty deposits exist outside of adipose tissue, such as those surrounding the heart, or as infiltration of skeletal muscle. This review focuses on adipose tissue and its contribution to dyslipidemias. Dyslipidemias are defined as circulating blood lipid levels that are too high or altered. Lipids include both traditional and nontraditional species. Leaving aside traditional definitions, adipose tissue contributes to dyslipidemias in a myriad of ways. To address a small portion of this topic, we reviewed (a) adipose tissue location and cell types, (b) body composition, (c) endocrine adipose, (d) the fat-brain axis, and (e) genetic susceptibility. The influence of these complex aspects of adipose tissue on dyslipidemias and human health, illustrating that, once again, that adipose tissue is a quintessential, multifunctional tissue of the human body, will be summarized.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: IntechOpen, 2019
Keywords
adipose tissue, adipocyte, body weight, body mass index, lipidomics, obesity, leptin, APOE, endocrine, brain
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes Cell and Molecular Biology Medical Genetics Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Geriatrics Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Individual and Society VIDSOC
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-18016 (URN)10.5772/intechopen.87439 (DOI)978-1-83968-004-5 (ISBN)978-1-83968-003-8 (ISBN)978-1-83968-005-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-12-17 Created: 2019-12-17 Last updated: 2020-01-29Bibliographically approved
Arnoldussen, I. A. C., Gustafson, D. R., Leijsen, E. M. C., de Leeuw, F.-E. & Kiliaan, A. J. (2019). Adiposity is related to cerebrovascular and brain volumetry outcomes in the RUN DMC study. Neurology, 93(9), e864-e878
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adiposity is related to cerebrovascular and brain volumetry outcomes in the RUN DMC study
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Neurology, ISSN 0028-3878, E-ISSN 1526-632X, Vol. 93, no 9, p. e864-e878Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Adiposity predictors, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and blood leptin and total adiponectin levels were associated with components of cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) and brain volumetry in 503 adults with CSVD who were ≥50 years of age and enrolled in the Radboud University Nijmegen Diffusion Tensor and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Cohort (RUN DMC).

METHODS: RUN DMC participants were followed up for 9 years (2006-2015). BMI, WC, brain imaging, and dementia diagnoses were evaluated at baseline and follow-up. Adipokines were measured at baseline. Brain imaging outcomes included CSVD components, white matter hyperintensities, lacunes, microbleeds, gray and white matter, hippocampal, total brain, and intracranial volumes.

RESULTS: Cross-sectionally among men at baseline, higher BMI, WC, and leptin were associated with lower gray matter and total brain volumes, and higher BMI and WC were associated with lower hippocampal volume. At follow-up 9 years later, higher BMI was cross-sectionally associated with lower gray matter volume, and an obese WC (>102 cm) was protective for ≥1 lacune or ≥1 microbleed in men. In women, increasing BMI and overweight or obesity (BMI ≥25 kg/m2 or WC >88 cm) were associated with ≥1 lacune. Longitudinally, over 9 years, a baseline obese WC was associated with decreasing hippocampal volume, particularly in men, and increasing white matter hyperintensity volume in women and men.

CONCLUSIONS: Anthropometric and metabolic adiposity predictors were differentially associated with CSVD components and brain volumetry outcomes by sex. Higher adiposity is associated with a vascular-neurodegenerative spectrum among adults at risk for vascular forms of cognitive impairment and dementias.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2019
National Category
Neurosciences Neurology Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging Endocrinology and Diabetes Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Individual and Society VIDSOC
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-18015 (URN)10.1212/WNL.0000000000008002 (DOI)31363056 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85071710175 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-12-17 Created: 2019-12-17 Last updated: 2020-01-29Bibliographically approved
Sigström, R. & Gustafson, D. R. (2019). Epidemiology of Psychotic Disorders: Methodological Issues and Empirical Findings. In: Carl I. Cohen, Paul D. Meesters (Ed.), Schizophrenia and Psychoses in Later Life: New Perspectives on Treatment, Research, and Policy (pp. 1-12). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Epidemiology of Psychotic Disorders: Methodological Issues and Empirical Findings
2019 (English)In: Schizophrenia and Psychoses in Later Life: New Perspectives on Treatment, Research, and Policy / [ed] Carl I. Cohen, Paul D. Meesters, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019, p. 1-12Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019
National Category
Geriatrics Psychiatry Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-18020 (URN)10.1017/9781108539593.002 (DOI)978-1-108-53959-3 (ISBN)1-108-72777-8 (ISBN)978-1-108-72777-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-12-18 Created: 2019-12-18 Last updated: 2020-01-03Bibliographically approved
Arnoldussen, I. A. C., Sundh, V., Bäckman, K., Kern, S., Östling, S., Blennow, K., . . . Gustafson, D. R. (2018). A 10-Year Follow-Up of Adiposity and Dementia in Swedish Adults Aged 70 Years and Older. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 63(4), 1325-1335
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A 10-Year Follow-Up of Adiposity and Dementia in Swedish Adults Aged 70 Years and Older
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 63, no 4, p. 1325-1335Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Adiposity measured in mid-or late-life and estimated using anthropometric measures such as body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), or metabolic markers such as blood leptin and adiponectin levels, is associated with late-onset dementia risk. However, during later life, this association may reverse and aging- and dementia-related processes may differentially affect adiposity measures.

Objective: We explored associations of concurrent BMI, WHR, and blood leptin and high molecular weight adiponectin levels with dementia occurrence.

Methods: 924 Swedish community-dwelling elderly without dementia, aged 70 years and older, systematically-sampled by birth day and birth year population-based in the Gothenburg city region of Sweden. The Gothenburg Birth Cohort Studies are designed for evaluating risk and protective factors for dementia. All dementias diagnosed after age 70 for 10 years were identified. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to predict dementia occurrence between 2000-2005, 2005-2010, and 2000-2010 after excluding prevalent baseline (year 2000) dementias. Baseline levels of BMI, WHR, leptin, and adiponectin were used.

Results: Within 5 years of baseline, low BMI (<20 kg/m(2)) was associated with higher odds of dementia compared to those in the healthy BMI category (>= 20-24.9 kg/m(2)). Compared to the lowest quartile, leptin levels in the second quartile were associated with lower odds of dementia in women (p < 0.05).

Conclusion: In late-life, anthropometric and metabolic adiposity measures appear to be differentially associated with dementia risk. While BMI and leptin levels are highly positively correlated, our results show that their association with dementia at age >= 70 years, is asynchronous. These data suggest that with aging, the complexity of the adiposity exposure may increase and suggests metabolic dysregulation. Additional studies are needed to better understand this complexity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOS Press, 2018
Keywords
Adiponectin, body mass index, dementia, elderly, leptin, waist hip ratio
National Category
Clinical Medicine Health Sciences
Research subject
Individual and Society VIDSOC
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-16011 (URN)10.3233/JAD-180099 (DOI)000433970000011 ()29758945 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85048631096 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-07-23 Created: 2018-07-23 Last updated: 2018-10-23Bibliographically approved
Gustafson, D. R. (2018). Epidemiology Informs Randomized Clinical Trials of Cognitive Impairments and Late-Onset, Sporadic Dementias. Journal of Neurology & Neuromedicine, 3(5), 13-18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Epidemiology Informs Randomized Clinical Trials of Cognitive Impairments and Late-Onset, Sporadic Dementias
2018 (English)In: Journal of Neurology & Neuromedicine, ISSN 2572-942X, Vol. 3, no 5, p. 13-18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sciaccess, 2018
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Geriatrics Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Individual and Society VIDSOC
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-18019 (URN)10.29245/2572.942X/2018/5.1220 (DOI)
Note

Opinion article

Available from: 2019-12-18 Created: 2019-12-18 Last updated: 2020-01-29Bibliographically approved
Gustafson, D. R. & McFarlane, S. I. (2018). Epidemiology of Type 2 Diabetes and Dementia. In: Velandai Srikanth and Zoe Arvanitakis (Ed.), Type 2 Diabetes and Dementia: (pp. 5-27). Elsevier
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Epidemiology of Type 2 Diabetes and Dementia
2018 (English)In: Type 2 Diabetes and Dementia / [ed] Velandai Srikanth and Zoe Arvanitakis, Elsevier, 2018, p. 5-27Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been associated with dementia in countless observational epidemiology studies. The expansion of epidemiologic research on T2D and dementia is due to scientific recognition of the roles of metabolic and vascular factors as etiologic players in dementia, as well as ominous global demographic shifts in aging, obesity, and dementia. This chapter addresses epidemiologic studies evaluating the association between T2D and late-onset dementias with foci on (1) T2D and dementia as syndromes; (2) T2D and mild cognitive impairment or cognition and cognitive decline; (3) vascular and metabolic risk factors and comorbidities; (4) genetic influences on the T2D-dementia association; (5) ethnoracial considerations; (6) T2D and brain outcomes and biological markers; and (7) clinical trials of T2D medications and cognition and dementia. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Alzheimer, Biomarkers, Cognitive impairment, Dementia, Diabetes, Genetics, Metabolic, Vascular
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Research subject
Individual and Society VIDSOC
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-16060 (URN)10.1016/B978-0-12-809454-9.00002-0 (DOI)000473252000003 ()2-s2.0-85047319286 (Scopus ID)9780128096949 (ISBN)9780128094549 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-09-10 Created: 2018-09-10 Last updated: 2019-08-01Bibliographically approved
Abulafia, C., Duarte-Abritta, B., Villarreal, M. F., Ladrón-de-Guevara, M. S., Garcia, C., Sequeyra, G., . . . Guinjoan, S. M. (2017). Relationship between Cognitive and Sleep-wake Variables in Asymptomatic Offspring of Patients with Late-onset Alzheimer's Disease. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 9, Article ID 93.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relationship between Cognitive and Sleep-wake Variables in Asymptomatic Offspring of Patients with Late-onset Alzheimer's Disease
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, ISSN 1663-4365, E-ISSN 1663-4365, Vol. 9, article id 93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Early neuropathological changes characteristic of late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) involve brain stem and limbic structures that regulate neurovegetative functions, including sleep-wake rhythm. Indeed, sleep pattern is an emerging biomarker and a potential pathophysiological mechanism in LOAD. We hypothesized that cognitively asymptomatic, middle-aged offspring of patients with LOAD (O-LOAD) would display a series of circadian rhythm abnormalities prior to the onset of objective cognitive alterations. We tested 31 children of patients with LOAD (O-LOAD) and 19 healthy individuals without family history of Alzheimer's disease (control subjects, CS) with basic tests of cognitive function, as well as actigraphy measures of sleep-wake rhythm, cardiac autonomic function, and bodily temperature. Unexpectedly, O-LOAD displayed subtle but significant deficits in verbal episodic memory (Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test delayed recall 10.6 +/- 0.4 vs. 8.6 +/- 0.6, t = 4.97, df = 49, p < 0.01) and language (Weschler's vocabulary 51.4 +/- 1.3 vs. 44.3 +/- 1.5, t = 2.49, df = 49, p < 0.001) compared to CS, even though all participants had results within the clinically normal range. O-LOAD showed a phase-delayed rhythm of body temperature (2.56 +/- 0.47 h vs. 3.8 +/- 0.26 h, t = 2.48, df = 40, p = 0.031). Cognitive performance in O-LOAD was associated with a series of cardiac autonomic sleep-wake variables; specifically indicators of greater sympathetic activity at night were related to poorer cognition. The present results suggest sleep pattern deserves further study as a potential neurobiological signature in LOAD, even in middle-aged, at risk individuals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2017
Keywords
early diagnosis, late-onset Alzheimer's disease, circadian rhythms, cardiac autonomic control, actigraphy
National Category
Clinical Medicine Psychology
Research subject
Individual and Society VIDSOC
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-13547 (URN)10.3389/fnagi.2017.00093 (DOI)000398725500001 ()28424614 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85018442242 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-05-05 Created: 2017-05-05 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Franx, B. A. A., Arnoldussen, I. A. C., Kiliaan, A. J. & Gustafson, D. R. (2017). Weight Loss in Patients with Dementia: Considering the Potential Impact of Pharmacotherapy. Drugs & Aging, 34(6), 425-436
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Weight Loss in Patients with Dementia: Considering the Potential Impact of Pharmacotherapy
2017 (English)In: Drugs & Aging, ISSN 1170-229X, E-ISSN 1179-1969, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 425-436Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Unintentional body weight loss is common in patients with dementia and is linked to cognitive impairment and poorer disease outcomes. It is proposed that some dementia medications with market approval, while aiming to improve cognitive and functional outcomes of a patient with dementia, are associated with reported body weight or body mass index loss. This review presents evidence in the published literature on body weight loss in dementia, describes selected theories behind body weight loss, evaluates the potential impact of approved dementia pharmacotherapies on body weight, considers the potential role for medical foods, understands the potential influence of treatments for neuropsychiatric symptoms and signs, and finally, summarizes this important area.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Adis International Ltd., 2017
National Category
Clinical Medicine Health Sciences
Research subject
Individual and Society VIDSOC
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-13791 (URN)10.1007/s40266-017-0462-x (DOI)000401319400002 ()28478593 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85027878619 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-06-20 Created: 2017-06-20 Last updated: 2019-11-26Bibliographically approved
Gustafson, D. R. & McFarlane, S. I. Obesity, cardiovascular disease risk and frailty in aging women with HIV infection. Geriatrics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Obesity, cardiovascular disease risk and frailty in aging women with HIV infection
(English)In: Geriatrics, ISSN 2308-3417Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI
National Category
Geriatrics Nutrition and Dietetics Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems Infectious Medicine Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Individual and Society VIDSOC
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-18021 (URN)
Note

Special Issue "Health and Disease in Frail Elderly: Assessment and Management in Clinical Practice"

Available from: 2019-12-18 Created: 2019-12-18 Last updated: 2019-12-18
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications