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Lautamatti, E., Mattila, K. J., Suominen, S., Sillanmäki, L. & Sumanen, M. (2023). A named General Practitioner (GP) is associated with an increase of hospital days in a single predictor analysis: a follow-up of 15 years. BMC Health Services Research, 23(1), Article ID 1178.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A named General Practitioner (GP) is associated with an increase of hospital days in a single predictor analysis: a follow-up of 15 years
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2023 (English)In: BMC Health Services Research, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 1178Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Continuity of care constitutes the basis of primary health care services and is associated with decreased hospitalization. In Finland, accessibility to primary care and increased use of hospital services are recognized challenges for the health care system. Objectives: The aim of the study was to determine whether having a named GP is associated with hospital service use. Methods: The data are part of the Health and Social Support study (HeSSup) based on a random Finnish working-age population sample. The cohort of the study comprised participants of postal surveys in 1998 (n = 25,898) who returned follow-up questionnaires both in 2003 and 2012 (n = 11,924). Background characteristics were inquired in the questionnaires, and hospitalization was derived from national registries (Hilmo-register). Results: A named GP was reported both in 2003 and 2012 only by 34.3% of the participants. The association between hospital days and a named GP was linearly rising and statistically significant in a single predictor model. The strongest associations with hospital use were with health-related factors, and the association with a named GP was no longer significant in multinomial analysis. Conclusion: A named GP is associated with an increased use of hospital days, but in a multinomial analysis the association disappeared. Health related factors showed the strongest association with hospital days. From the perspective of the on-going Finnish health and social services reform, continuity of care should be emphasized. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
Continuity of Care, Finnish healthcare, Health care services, Hospital days, Logistic regression analysis, Named GP, Register-based, Delivery of Health Care, Follow-Up Studies, General Practitioners, Hospitals, Humans, Social Work, adult, article, cohort analysis, female, follow up, general practitioner, hospital service, hospitalization, human, human experiment, major clinical study, male, patient care, questionnaire, social support, health care delivery, hospital
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Research subject
Research on Citizen Centered Health, University of Skövde (Reacch US)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-23349 (URN)10.1186/s12913-023-10184-5 (DOI)001093481700001 ()37898748 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85175259228 (Scopus ID)
Note

CC BY 4.0 DEED

CC0 1.0 DEED

© The Author(s) 2023. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.

Correspondence Address: E. Lautamatti; Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland; email: emmi.lautamatti@tuni.fi

Open access funding provided by Tampere University (including Tampere University Hospital). A personal grant was awarded to the corresponding author by the Foundation of General Practice, General Practitioners in Finland (GPF), Tampere University Hospital, The Finnish Medical Association and The Finnish Medical Foundation (No. 7045).

Available from: 2023-11-09 Created: 2023-11-09 Last updated: 2023-11-24Bibliographically approved
El Ansari, W., Suominen, S., El-Ansari, K. & Šebeňa, R. (2023). Are behavioural risk factors clusters associated with self-reported health complaints?: University students in Finland. Central European Journal of Public Health, 31(4), 248-255
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are behavioural risk factors clusters associated with self-reported health complaints?: University students in Finland
2023 (English)In: Central European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1210-7778, E-ISSN 1803-1048, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 248-255Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: No previous research of university students in Finland assessed lifestyle behavioural risk factors (BRFs) and categorized students into clusters, explored the associations of the clusters with self-reported health complaints (HCs), whilst controlling for potential confounders. The current study undertook this task. METHODS: Students at the University of Turku (1,177) completed an online well-being questionnaire that assessed socio-demographic variables, 5 BRFs - problematic alcohol consumption, smoking, illicit drug use, food consumption habits, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and 22 HCs. A food frequency questionnaire assessed students' consumption of a range of foods, and a dietary guideline adherence score was computed based on WHO dietary recommendations for Europe. Three separate regression models appraised the associations between the cluster membership and HCs factors, adjusting for sex, income sufficiency and self-rated health. RESULTS: Mean age was 23 ± 5.2 years, 77% had never smoked and 79% never used illicit drug/s. Factor analysis of HCs resulted in four-factors (psychological, circulatory/breathing, gastro-intestinal, pains/aches); cluster analysis of BRFs identified two distinctive student clusters. Cluster 1 represented more healthy students who never smoked/used illicit drugs, had no problematic drinking, and undertook MVPA on 4.42 ± 3.36 days/week. As for cluster 2 students, half the cluster smoked occasionally/daily, used illicit drug/s, and > 50% had problematic drinking and students undertook MVPA on 4.02 ± 3.12 days/week. More cluster 2 students adhered to healthy eating recommendations, but the difference was not significant between clusters. Regression analysis revealed that females, those with sufficient income, and with excellent/very good self-rated general health were significantly less likely to report all four HCs. Cluster 2 students were significantly more likely to report psychological complaints, circulatory/breathing and gastro-intestinal complaints. There was no significant association between BRFs clusters and pains/aches factor. CONCLUSIONS: Risk taking students with less healthy lifestyles and behaviour were consistently associated with poorer psychological and somatic health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Prague: National Institute of Public Health, 2023
Keywords
behavioural risk factors, cluster analysis, complaints, psychological, somatic, university students, Adolescent, Adult, Female, Finland, Humans, Illicit Drugs, Pain, Risk Factors, Self Report, Students, Surveys and Questionnaires, Universities, Young Adult, illicit drug, epidemiology, human, psychology, questionnaire, risk factor, student, university
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Research on Citizen Centered Health, University of Skövde (Reacch US)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-23601 (URN)10.21101/cejph.a7916 (DOI)38309702 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85184098354 (Scopus ID)
Note

The authors thank the University and students who participated in the survey. This work was supported by the Slovak Research and Development Agency under the contract No. APVV-19-0284

Available from: 2024-02-15 Created: 2024-02-15 Last updated: 2024-02-16Bibliographically approved
Elovainio, M., Komulainen, K., Sipilä, P. N., Pulkki-Råback, L., Cachón Alonso, L., Pentti, J., . . . Kivimäki, M. (2023). Association of social isolation and loneliness with risk of incident hospital-treated infections: an analysis of data from the UK Biobank and Finnish Health and Social Support studies. The Lancet Public Health, 8(2), e109-e118
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association of social isolation and loneliness with risk of incident hospital-treated infections: an analysis of data from the UK Biobank and Finnish Health and Social Support studies
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2023 (English)In: The Lancet Public Health, ISSN 2468-2667, Vol. 8, no 2, p. e109-e118Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Although loneliness and social isolation have been linked to an increased risk of non-communicable diseases such as cardiovascular disease and dementia, their association with the risk of severe infection is uncertain. We aimed to examine the associations between loneliness and social isolation and the risk of hospital-treated infections using data from two independent cohort studies. Methods: We assessed the association between loneliness and social isolation and incident hospital-treated infections using data for participants from the UK Biobank study aged 38–73 years at baseline and participants from the nationwide population-based Finnish Health and Social Support (HeSSup) study aged 20–54 years at baseline. For inclusion in the study, participants had to be linked to national health registries, have no history of hospital-treated infections at or before baseline, and have complete data on loneliness or social isolation. Participants with missing data on hospital-treated infections, loneliness, and social isolation were excluded from both cohorts. The outcome was defined as a hospital admission with a primary diagnosis of infection, ascertained via linkage to electronic health records. Findings: After exclusion of 8·6 million participants for not responding or not providing appropriate consent, the UK Biobank cohort consisted of 456 905 participants (249 586 women and 207 319 men). 26 860 (6·2%) of 436 001 participants with available data were reported as being lonely and 40 428 (9·0%) of 448 114 participants with available data were socially isolated. During a median 8·9 years (IQR 8·0–9·6) of follow-up, 51 361 participants were admitted to hospital due to an infectious disease. After adjustment for age, sex, demographic and lifestyle factors, and morbidities, loneliness was associated with an increased risk of a hospital-treated infection (hazard ratio [HR] 1·12 [95% CI 1·07–1·16]), whereas social isolation was not (HR 1·01 [95% CI 0·97–1·04]). Of 64 797 individuals in the HeSSup cohort, 18 468 (11 367 women and 7101 men) were eligible for inclusion. 4466 (24·4%) of 18 296 were lonely and 1776 (9·7%) of 18 376 socially isolated. During a median follow-up of 10·0 years (IQR 10·0–10·1), 814 (4·4%) participants were admitted to hospital for an infectious disease. The HRs for the HeSSup study replicated those in the UK Biobank (multivariable-adjusted HR for loneliness 1·32 [95% CI 1·06–1·64]; 1·08 [0·87–1·35] for social isolation). Interpretation: Loneliness might increase susceptibility to severe infections, although the magnitude of this effect appears modest and residual confounding cannot be excluded. Interventional studies are required before policy recommendations can advance. Funding: Academy of Finland, the UK Medical Research Council, and Wellcome Trust UK.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Biological Specimen Banks, Communicable Diseases, Female, Finland, Humans, Loneliness, Male, Social Support, United Kingdom, biobank, communicable disease, epidemiology, human
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Infectious Medicine
Research subject
Research on Citizen Centered Health, University of Skövde (Reacch US)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-22248 (URN)10.1016/S2468-2667(22)00253-5 (DOI)001029344500001 ()36669514 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85146855186 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Academy of Finland, 339390Academy of Finland, 321409Academy of Finland, 329240Wellcome trust, 221854/Z/20/ZAcademy of Finland, 350426NordForsk, 75021EU, Horizon 2020, 101040247
Note

CC BY 4.0

This is an Open Access article under the CC BY 4.0 license

© 2023 The Author(s)

Correspondence Address: M. Elovainio; Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, 00014, Finland; email: marko.elovainio@helsinki.fi

ME was supported by the Academy of Finland (339390). PNS was supported by the Emil Aaltonen Foundation and Finnish Medical Foundation. JV was supported by the Academy of Finland (321409 and 329240). MK was supported by the UK Medical Research Council (S011676), Wellcome Trust UK (221854/Z/20/Z), National Institute on Aging USA (R01AG056477), and the Academy of Finland (350426). STN was supported by NordForsk (75021) and the Finnish Work Environment Fund (190424). CH was supported by the European Research Council under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant number 101040247). This research has been done using the UK Biobank Resource under application number 14801.

Available from: 2023-02-09 Created: 2023-02-09 Last updated: 2023-08-14Bibliographically approved
Kivimäki, M., Batty, G. D., Pentti, J., Suomi, J., Nyberg, S. T., Merikanto, J., . . . Vahtera, J. (2023). Climate Change, Summer Temperature, and Heat-Related Mortality in Finland: Multicohort Study with Projections for a Sustainable vs. Fossil-Fueled Future to 2050. Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, 131(12), 1270201-1-1270201-16
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate Change, Summer Temperature, and Heat-Related Mortality in Finland: Multicohort Study with Projections for a Sustainable vs. Fossil-Fueled Future to 2050
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 131, no 12, p. 1270201-1-1270201-16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Climate change scenarios illustrate various pathways in terms of global warming ranging from "sustainable development" (Shared Socioeconomic Pathway SSP1-1.9), the best-case scenario, to 'fossil-fueled development' (SSP5-8.5), the worst-case scenario. OBJECTIVES: We examined the extent to which increase in daily average urban summer temperature is associated with future cause-specific mortality and projected heat-related mortality burden for the current warming trend and these two scenarios. METHODS: We did an observational cohort study of 363,754 participants living in six cities in Finland. Using residential addresses, participants were linked to daily temperature records and electronic death records from national registries during summers (1 May to 30 September) 2000 to 2018. For each day of observation, heat index (average daily air temperature weighted by humidity) for the preceding 7 d was calculated for participants' residential area using a geographic grid at a spatial resolution of formula presented . We examined associations of the summer heat index with risk of death by cause for all participants adjusting for a wide range of individual-level covariates and in subsidiary analyses using case-crossover design, computed the related period population attributable fraction (PAF), and projected change in PAF from summers 2000-2018 compared with those in 2030-2050. RESULTS: During a cohort total exposure period of 582,111,979 summer days (3,880,746 person-summers), we recorded 4,094 deaths, including 949 from cardiovascular disease. The multivariable-adjusted rate ratio (RR) for high (formula presented ) vs. reference (formula presented ) heat index was 1.70 (95% CI: 1.28, 2.27) for cardiovascular mortality, but it did not reach statistical significance for noncardiovascular deaths, formula presented (95% CI: 0.96, 1.36), a finding replicated in case-crossover analysis. According to projections for 2030-2050, PAF of summertime cardiovascular mortality attributable to high heat will be 4.4% (1.8%-7.3%) under the sustainable development scenario, but 7.6% (3.2%-12.3%) under the fossil-fueled development scenario. In the six cities, the estimated annual number of summertime heat-related cardiovascular deaths under the two scenarios will be 174 and 298 for a total population of 1,759,468 people. DISCUSSION: The increase in average urban summer temperature will raise heat-related cardiovascular mortality burden. The estimated magnitude of this burden is formula presented times greater if future climate change is driven by fossil fuels rather than sustainable development. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP12080.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
EHP Publishing, 2023
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases, Climate Change, Finland, Fossils, Hot Temperature, Humans, Mortality, Temperature, cardiovascular disease, epidemiology, fossil, high temperature, human
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Research on Citizen Centered Health, University of Skövde (Reacch US)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-23529 (URN)10.1289/EHP12080 (DOI)38150315 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85181395228 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Academy of Finland, 329240Academy of Finland, 329241Academy of Finland, 329235Wellcome trust, 221854/Z/20/ZAcademy of Finland, 329202Academy of Finland, 350426Academy of Finland, 329202Academy of Finland, 332030Academy of Finland, 321409
Note

Public domain

Address correspondence to Jussi Vahtera, Department of Public Health,University of Turku, Kiinamyllynkatu 10, 20520 Turku, Finland. Email:jussi.vahtera@utu.fi

This study was supported by the Academy of Finland (329240; 329241; 329235). M.K. was supported by the Wellcome Trust (221854/Z/20/Z), the UK Medical Research Council (MR/S011676/1), the U.S. National Institute on Aging (NIH; R01AG056477), and the Academy of Finland (329202, 350426). G.D.B. was supported by the UK Medical Research Council (MR/P023444/1) and the U.S. National Institute on Aging (1R56AG052519-01; 1R01AG052519-01A1). J.P. and S.T.N. were supported by the Finnish Work Environment Fund (190424) and the Academy of Finland (329202). J.K. and J.S. are grateful for the support by the University of Turku Geography Division and the City of Turku for maintaining the TURCLIM network. S.S. was supported by the Academy of Finland (332030). J.V. was supported by the Academy of Finland (321409). The funders of the study had no role in study design, data collection, data analysis, data interpretation, or writing of the report.

Available from: 2024-01-11 Created: 2024-01-11 Last updated: 2024-01-16Bibliographically approved
Stenlund, S., Mâsse, L. C., Stenlund, D., Sillanmäki, L., Appelt, K. C., Koivumaa-Honkanen, H., . . . Patrick, D. M. (2023). Do Patients’ Psychosocial Characteristics Impact Antibiotic Prescription Rates?. Antibiotics, 12(6), 1022-1022
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do Patients’ Psychosocial Characteristics Impact Antibiotic Prescription Rates?
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2023 (English)In: Antibiotics, ISSN 0066-4774, E-ISSN 2079-6382, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 1022-1022Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous research suggests that the characteristics of both patients and physicians can contribute to the overuse of antibiotics. Until now, patients’ psychosocial characteristics have not been widely explored as a potential contributor to the overuse of antibiotics. In this study, the relationship between a patient’s psychosocial characteristics (self-reported in postal surveys in 2003) and the number of antibiotics they were prescribed (recorded in Finnish national registry data between 2004–2006) were analyzed for 19,300 working-aged Finns. Psychosocial characteristics included life satisfaction, a sense of coherence, perceived stress, hostility, and optimism. In a structural equation model, patients’ adverse psychosocial characteristics were not related to increased antibiotic prescriptions in the subsequent three years. However, these characteristics were strongly associated with poor general health status, which in turn was associated with an increased number of subsequent antibiotic prescriptions. Furthermore, mediation analysis showed that individuals who used healthcare services more frequently also received more antibiotic prescriptions. The current study does not support the view that patients’ adverse psychosocial characteristics are related to an increased number of antibiotic prescriptions. This could encourage physicians to actively discuss treatment options with their patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2023
Keywords
antibiotic prescribing, antibiotic consumption, psychosocial, structural equation modeling, excess antibiotic use, antimicrobial stewardship
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Social and Clinical Pharmacy
Research subject
Research on Citizen Centered Health, University of Skövde (Reacch US)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-23048 (URN)10.3390/antibiotics12061022 (DOI)001016894700001 ()37370341 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85163704231 (Scopus ID)
Note

CC BY 4.0

This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Prescribing and Antimicrobial Use in Healthcare Settings

Correspondence: sade.stenlund@utu.fi

This research was funded by a personal grant for S.S. (Säde Stenlund) from the Signea nd Ane Gyllenberg Foundation, grant number 5723. K.C.A. is funded by a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Partnership Development Grant, grant number 890-2019-0015, and a University of British Columbia Grant for Catalyzing Research Clusters, grant number n/a. L.C.M. received salary support from the BC Children’s Hospital Research Institute. D.S. is funded through a personal grant from the Magnus Ehrnrooth Foundation, grant number 182282, and the Swedish Cultural Foundation in Finland, grant number n/a.

Available from: 2023-07-20 Created: 2023-07-20 Last updated: 2023-10-10Bibliographically approved
Halme, M., Rautava, P., Sillanmäki, L., Sumanen, M., Suominen, S., Vahtera, J., . . . Salo, P. (2023). Educational level and the use of mental health services, psychotropic medication and psychotherapy among adults with a history of physician diagnosed mental disorders. International Journal of Social Psychiatry, 69(2), 493-502
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Educational level and the use of mental health services, psychotropic medication and psychotherapy among adults with a history of physician diagnosed mental disorders
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2023 (English)In: International Journal of Social Psychiatry, ISSN 0020-7640, E-ISSN 1741-2854, Vol. 69, no 2, p. 493-502Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The prevalence of mental disorders is increased among people of low socioeconomic status or educational level, but it remains unclear whether their access to treatment matches their increased need.

Aims: Our objective was to examine whether educational level as an indicator of socioeconomic status is associated with use of mental health services, psychotropic medication and psychotherapy in Finland.

Method: Cross-sectional data from a follow-up survey of a longitudinal, population-based cohort study were used to form a sample of 3,053 men and women aged 24 to 68 with a current or previous physician diagnosed mental disorder. The prevalence of mental disorders, mental health service use and educational level were assessed with self-report questionnaire. Educational level was determined by the highest educational attainment and grouped into three levels: high, intermediate and low. The associations between educational level and mental health service -related outcomes were assessed with binary logistic regression. Covariates in the fully adjusted model were age, gender and number of somatic diseases.

Results: Compared to high educational level, low educational level was associated with higher odds of using antidepressants (OR 1.35, 95% CI [1.09, 1.66]), hypnotics (OR 1.33, 95% CI [1.07, 1.66]) and sedatives (OR 2.17, 95% CI [1.69, 2.78]), and lower odds of using mental health services (OR 0.80, 95% CI [0.65, 0.98]). No associations were found between educational level and use of psychotherapy.

Conclusions: The results do not suggest a general socioeconomic status related mismatch. A pharmacological emphasis was observed in the treatment of low educational background participants, whereas overall mental health service use was emphasized among high educational background participants. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
Educational level, mental health service use, psychotherapy, psychotropic medication, socioeconomic status
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Occupational Health and Environmental Health Geriatrics
Research subject
Research on Citizen Centered Health, University of Skövde (Reacch US)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-21653 (URN)10.1177/00207640221111091 (DOI)000823185500001 ()35819228 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85134266892 (Scopus ID)
Note

CC BY 4.0

© The Author(s) 2022.

First Published July 12, 2022

The author(s) received no financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article.

Available from: 2022-07-28 Created: 2022-07-28 Last updated: 2023-03-28Bibliographically approved
Lassander, M., Saarinen, T., Simonsen-Rehn, N., Suominen, S., Vahlberg, T. & Volanen, S.-M. (2023). Healthy Learning Mind (HLM): Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial on A Mindfulness Intervention, Moderators and Association with Perceived Socioeconomic Status, and Comparison to Other National Data. Child and Youth Care Forum, 52(1), 157-176
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Healthy Learning Mind (HLM): Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial on A Mindfulness Intervention, Moderators and Association with Perceived Socioeconomic Status, and Comparison to Other National Data
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2023 (English)In: Child and Youth Care Forum, ISSN 1053-1890, E-ISSN 1573-3319, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 157-176Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: This paper presents the baseline characteristics and their moderators in the Healthy Learning Mind (HLM)– school-based cluster-randomized controlled trial. Objectives: The paper evaluates the state of various measures of well-being, their moderators and how these results compare to national and global norms/population studies. Methods: Data were collected from all participants prior to the intervention and further analyzed by gender, grade and perceived socioeconomic status, including standardized measures for resilience, depressive symptoms and socioemotional functioning; health-related quality of life, dispositional mindfulness, satisfaction with life, compassion/self-kindness, self-rated health and morning tiredness. Results: Participating 2793 students (1425 girls, 1368 boys), ages 12 to 15 years, filled in the questionnaires. The outcomes were in line with previous research, demonstrating gender differentiation and lower wellbeing among older children and adolescents. Conclusions: All outcomes were associated with perceived socioeconomic status, suggesting that perceived low socioeconomic status should be addressed as a serious risk factor and included as a moderator in similar trials. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2023
Keywords
Adolescents, Baseline, Cluster randomized controlled trial, Mindfulness, Perceived socioeconomic status, School-based intervention
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Research on Citizen Centered Health, University of Skövde (Reacch US)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-20966 (URN)10.1007/s10566-022-09683-z (DOI)000770389900001 ()2-s2.0-85125401994 (Scopus ID)
Note

CC BY 4.0

© 2022, The Author(s).

Maarit Lassander maarit@lassander.net

Published: 01 March 2022

This project is funded by Signe and Ane Gyllenberg Foundation; Juho Vainio Foundation; Mats Brommels Foundation; Yrjö Jahnsson Foundation; Ministry of Social Affairs and Health. The study protocol has undergone peer-review by all the funding bodies.

Available from: 2022-03-10 Created: 2022-03-10 Last updated: 2023-01-31Bibliographically approved
Sipilä, P. N., Lindbohm, J. V., Batty, G. D., Heikkilä, N., Vahtera, J., Suominen, S., . . . Kivimäki, M. (2023). Severe Infection and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: A Multicohort Study. Circulation, 147(21), 1582-1593
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Severe Infection and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: A Multicohort Study
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2023 (English)In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 147, no 21, p. 1582-1593Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The excess risk of cardiovascular disease associated with a wide array of infectious diseases is unknown. We quantified the short- and long-term risk of major cardiovascular events in people with severe infection and estimated the population-attributable fraction. Methods: We analyzed data from 331 683 UK Biobank participants without cardiovascular disease at baseline (2006-2010) and replicated our main findings in an independent population from 3 prospective cohort studies comprising 271 329 community-dwelling participants from Finland (baseline 1986-2005). Cardiovascular risk factors were measured at baseline. We diagnosed infectious diseases (the exposure) and incident major cardiovascular events after infections, defined as myocardial infarction, cardiac death, or fatal or nonfatal stroke (the outcome) from linkage of participants to hospital and death registers. We computed adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs for infectious diseases as short- and long-term risk factors for incident major cardiovascular events. We also calculated population-attributable fractions for long-term risk. Results: In the UK Biobank (mean follow-up, 11.6 years), 54 434 participants were hospitalized for an infection, and 11 649 had an incident major cardiovascular event at follow-up. Relative to participants with no record of infectious disease, those who were hospitalized experienced increased risk of major cardiovascular events, largely irrespective of the type of infection. This association was strongest during the first month after infection (HR, 7.87 [95% CI, 6.36-9.73]), but remained elevated during the entire follow-up (HR, 1.47 [95% CI, 1.40-1.54]). The findings were similar in the replication cohort (HR, 7.64 [95% CI, 5.82-10.03] during the first month; HR, 1.41 [95% CI, 1.34-1.48] during mean follow-up of 19.2 years). After controlling for traditional cardiovascular risk factors, the population-attributable fraction for severe infections and major cardiovascular events was 4.4% in the UK Biobank and 6.1% in the replication cohort. Conclusions: Infections severe enough to require hospital treatment were associated with increased risks for major cardiovascular disease events immediately after hospitalization. A small excess risk was also observed in the long-term, but residual confounding cannot be excluded.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Heart Association, 2023
Keywords
cohort studies, communicable diseases, myocardial infarction, stroke, Cardiovascular Diseases, Humans, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, cardiovascular disease, communicable disease, complication, heart infarction, human, prospective study, risk factor
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Research subject
Research on Citizen Centered Health, University of Skövde (Reacch US)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-22655 (URN)10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.122.061183 (DOI)000991896400004 ()36971007 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85160208376 (Scopus ID)
Funder
NordForsk, 75021Academy of Finland, 329202, 350426, 311492, 321409, 329240Wellcome trust, 201440/Z/16/Z, 221854/Z/20/Z
Note

CC BY 4.0

Correspondence to: Pyry Sipilä, Clinicum, Department of Public Health, PO Box 20, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland. Email pyry.sipila@helsinki.fi

Acknowledgments

This research was conducted using data from the UK Biobank (https://www.ukbiobank.ac.uk/) via application 60565.

Sources of Funding

This work was funded in whole, or in part, by grants from NordForsk (75021), Academy of Finland (329202 and 350426), Helsinki Institute of Life Science, Emil Aaltonen Foundation, Finnish Medical Foundation, Päivikki and Sakari Sohlberg Foundation, Finnish Foundation for Cardiovascular Research (a86898), US National Institute on Aging (R01AG056477, 1R56AG052519-01, and 1R01AG052519-01A1), UK Medical Research Council (MRC S011676/1, R024227/1, and MR/P023444/1), and Wellcome Trust (201440/Z/16/Z and 221854/Z/20/Z). The funders had no role in study design, data collection, analysis, or interpretation, or writing of the report or decision to submit it for publication.

Disclosures

Dr Sipilä reports grant support during the conduct of the study from NordForsk (75021), Academy of Finland (311492 and 329202), Helsinki Institute of Life Science, Emil Aaltonen Foundation, and Finnish Medical Foundation. Dr Lindbohm reports grant support during the conduct of the study from the Academy of Finland (339568) and Päivikki and Sakari Sohlberg Foundation. Dr Batty reports grant support from the UK Medical Research Council (MR/P023444/1) and US National Institute on Aging (1R56AG052519-01 and 1R01AG052519-01A1). Dr Vahtera reports grant support from the Academy of Finland (321409 and 329240) and NordForsk (75021). Dr Nyberg reports grant support from NordForsk (75021). Dr Warren-Gash reports support from Wellcome Fellowship (201440/Z/16/Z). Dr Kivimäki reports grant support during the conduct of the study from NordForsk (75021), UK Medical Research Council (MRC S011676/1 and R024227/1), US National Institute on Aging (R01AG056477), Academy of Finland (329202 and 350426), Finnish Foundation for Cardiovascular Research (a86898), Finnish Work Environment Fund (190424), and Wellcome Trust (221854/Z/20/Z). The other authors report no conflicts.

Available from: 2023-06-08 Created: 2023-06-08 Last updated: 2023-07-14Bibliographically approved
Carlén, K., Suominen, S. & Augustine, L. (2023). The association between adolescents’ self-esteem and perceived mental well-being in Sweden in four years of follow-up. BMC Psychology, 11, Article ID 413.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The association between adolescents’ self-esteem and perceived mental well-being in Sweden in four years of follow-up
2023 (English)In: BMC Psychology, E-ISSN 2050-7283, Vol. 11, article id 413Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background The situation concerning adolescent mental health is a global public health concern, and the concept includes the ability to cope with problems of everyday life. A person’s approach and attitude towards themselves, i.e., their self-esteem, affects mental health. The study aimed to appraise and deepen the scientific understanding of adolescents’ self-reported self-esteem at age 12−13 from a resource perspective and test its ability to predict subsequent perceived mental well-being at age 17.

Methods Data from the Longitudinal Research on Development in Adolescence (LoRDIA) prospective follow-up study of adolescents aged 12−13, and 17 (n=654) were analysed using ANCOVA. The outcome variable, perceived mental well-being (MWB), covers the aspects of mental well-being inspired by the “Mental Health Continuum,” representing positive mental health. Covariates were self-esteem (SE) and reported initially perceived MWB at age 12−13. Other independent explanatory variables were gender, the family’s economy, and the mother’s educational level.

Results Self-esteem appeared relatively stable from 12−13 to 17 years (M=20.7 SD=5.8 vs. M=20.5 SD=1.7). There was a significant but inverted U – shaped association between SE at age 12–13 and perceived MWB at age 17 [F (1, 646)=19.02, β-0.057; CI -0.08−-0.03, Eta=0.03, p=.000]. Intermediate but not strong SE predicted significantly good MWB. When conducting the ANCOVA for boys and girls separately, only the mother’s educational level was significantly positively associated with perceived MWB of girls.

Conclusions Good self-esteem in early adolescence increases the likelihood of an unchanged favourable development of self-esteem and the probability of good perceived mental well-being. SE explained 18 per cent of the variation of MWB, and even more among girls. However, normal SE rather than high SE at 12 and 13 years is predictive of later mental well-being. Girls reported low self-esteem more often. Therefore, supporting self-esteem early in life can promote mental well-being in adolescence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
Adolescence, Mental health status, Mental well-being, Promotion, Self-esteem, Self-concept
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Psychiatry Medical and Health Sciences Pediatrics
Research subject
Family-Centred Health; Research on Citizen Centered Health, University of Skövde (Reacch US)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-21940 (URN)10.1186/s40359-023-01450-6 (DOI)001109365500001 ()38007469 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85177765708 (Scopus ID)
Funder
University of SkövdeKempe-Carlgrenska Foundation
Note

CC BY 4.0 DEED

© The Author(s) 2023. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.

© 2023 BioMed Central Ltd unless otherwise stated. Part of Springer Nature.

Correspondence: Kristina Carlén kristina.carlen@his.se

Open access funding provided by University of Skövde. The Kempe-Carlgrenska Foundation was founded partly during the time for the analysis and interpretation of data and in writing the manuscript.

Available from: 2022-10-12 Created: 2022-10-12 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Hawajri, O., Lindberg, J. & Suominen, S. (2023). Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy as a Treatment Method Against Anxiety Disorders and Depression: A Structured Literature Review. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 44(4), 245-269
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy as a Treatment Method Against Anxiety Disorders and Depression: A Structured Literature Review
2023 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 245-269Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mental illness is a growing global health problem affecting individuals and society. In Sweden, the number of people suffering from mental health illnesses, such as anxiety and depression, is increasing and is expected to be one of the largest public health challenges in 2030. As mental illness increases, the area also needs effective forms of treatment. This study aims to investigate if Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy (VRET) works as a treatment method for adults suffering from anxiety disorders and depression. A structured literature review based on 24 articles found in the databases PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL and PsycInfo. Two reviewers independently reviewed and collectively extracted data from the included articles. The articles have been analyzed by using thematic analysis. The results suggest that Virtual reality exposure therapy can work as an effective treatment method for adults with anxiety disorders. It also indicates that VRET may act as a health-promoting intervention to reduce anxiety disorders, phobias, and depression symptoms. Virtual reality exposure therapy can be an effective treatment method and health-promoting effort against anxiety disorders in adults. An essential factor for the patients who accept VRET as a treatment is the initial information therapists give. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2023
National Category
Psychiatry Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Research on Citizen Centered Health, University of Skövde (Reacch US)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-22491 (URN)10.1080/01612840.2023.2190051 (DOI)000970951400001 ()37075308 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85153381308 (Scopus ID)
Note

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

© 2023 The Author(s). Published with license by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

 Taylor & Francis Group an Informa business

Published online: 19 Apr 2023

CONTACT Omar Hawajri Omar.hawajri@ki.se Department of Neurology, Care Sciences and Society- Division of nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Alfred Nobels allé 23, 141 83 Huddinge, Sweden.

The  author(s) reported there is no funding associated with the work featured in this article.

Available from: 2023-05-04 Created: 2023-05-04 Last updated: 2023-07-14Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6648-603X

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