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Iguacel, I., Fernandez-Alvira, J. M., Bammann, K., De Clercq, B., Eiben, G., Gwozdz, W., . . . Moreno, L. A. (2016). Associations between social vulnerabilities and dietary patterns in European children: the Identification and prevention of Dietary- and lifestyle-induced health EFfects In Children and infantS (IDEFICS) study. British Journal of Nutrition, 116(7), 1288-1297
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between social vulnerabilities and dietary patterns in European children: the Identification and prevention of Dietary- and lifestyle-induced health EFfects In Children and infantS (IDEFICS) study
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2016 (English)In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 116, no 7, p. 1288-1297Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Socio-economic inequalities in childhood can determine dietary patterns, and therefore future health. This study aimed to explore associations between social vulnerabilities and dietary patterns assessed at two time points, and to investigate the association between accumulation of vulnerabilities and dietary patterns. A total of 9301 children aged 2-9 years participated at baseline and 2-year follow-up examinations of the Identification and prevention of Dietary-and lifestyle-induced health EFfects In Children and infantS study. In all, three dietary patterns were identified at baseline and follow-up by applying the K-means clustering algorithm based on a higher frequency of consumption of snacks and fast food (processed), sweet foods and drinks (sweet), and fruits and vegetables (healthy). Vulnerable groups were defined at baseline as follows: children whose parents lacked a social network, children from single-parent families, children of migrant origin and children with unemployed parents. Multinomial mixed models were used to assess the associations between social vulnerabilities and children's dietary patterns at baseline and follow-up. Children whose parents lacked a social network (OR 1.31; 99% CI 1.01, 1.70) and migrants (OR 1.45; 99% CI 1.15, 1.83) were more likely to be in the processed cluster at baseline and follow-up. Children whose parents were homemakers (OR 0.74; 99% CI 0.60, 0.92) were less likely to be in the processed cluster at baseline. A higher number of vulnerabilities was associated with a higher probability of children being in the processed cluster (OR 1.78; 99% CI 1.21, 2.62). Therefore, special attention should be paid to children of vulnerable groups as they present unhealthier dietary patterns.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2016
Keywords
Vulnerable groups, Dietary patterns, Inequalities, Socio-economic status, Children
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14411 (URN)10.1017/S0007114516003330 (DOI)000386911000016 ()27666744 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84988737023 (Scopus ID)
Note

Group Author(s): IDEFICS Consortium

Available from: 2017-11-16 Created: 2017-11-16 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Verbestel, V., De Henauw, S., Bammann, K., Barba, G., Hadjigeorgiou, C., Eiben, G., . . . De Bourdeaudhuij, I. (2015). Are context-specific measures of parental-reported physical activity and sedentary behaviour associated with accelerometer data in 2-9-year-old European children?. Public Health Nutrition, 18(5), 860-868
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are context-specific measures of parental-reported physical activity and sedentary behaviour associated with accelerometer data in 2-9-year-old European children?
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2015 (English)In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 860-868Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate if context-specific measures of parental-reported physical activity and sedentary behaviour are associated with objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time in children. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Seven European countries taking part in the IDEFICS (Identification and Prevention of Dietary-and Lifestyle-induced Health Effects in Children and Infants) study. Subjects: Data were analysed from 2-9-year-old children (n 5982) who provided both parental-reported and accelerometer-derived physical activity/sedentary behaviour measures. Parents reported their children's daily screen-time, weekly sports participation and daily outdoor playtime by means of the Outdoor Playtime Checklist (OPC) and Outdoor Playtime Recall Questions (OPRQ). Results: Sports participation, OPC-and OPRQ-derived outdoor play were positively associated with accelerometer-derived physical activity. Television viewing and computer use were positively associated with accelerometer-derived sedentary time. All parental-reported measures that were significantly associated with accelerometer outcomes explained only a minor part of the variance in accelerometer-derived physical activity or sedentary time. Conclusions: Parental-reported measures of physical activity and sedentary behaviour are not useful as a proxy for 2-9-year-old children's physical activity and sedentary time. Findings do not preclude the use of context-specific measures but imply that conclusions should be limited to the context-specific behaviours that are actually measured. Depending on the aim of the study, future research should carefully consider the choice of measurements, including the use of subjective or objective measures of the behaviour of interest or a combination of both.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2015
Keywords
Accelerometer, Proxy report, Physical activity, Sedentary behaviour, Children
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14431 (URN)10.1017/S136898001400086X (DOI)000350303900012 ()24887315 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84924044593 (Scopus ID)
Note

Group Author(s): IDEFICS Consortium

Available from: 2017-11-16 Created: 2017-11-16 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Gwozdz, W., Sousa-Poza, A., Reisch, L. A., Bammann, K., Eiben, G., Kourides, Y., . . . Pigeot, I. (2015). Peer effects on obesity in a sample of European children. Economics and Human Biology, 18, 139-152
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Peer effects on obesity in a sample of European children
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2015 (English)In: Economics and Human Biology, ISSN 1570-677X, E-ISSN 1873-6130, Vol. 18, p. 139-152Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study analyzes peer effects on childhood obesity using data from the first two waves of the IDEFICS study, which applies several anthropometric and other measures of fatness to approximately 14,000 children aged two to nine participating in both waves in 16 regions of eight European countries. Peers are defined as same-sex children in the same school and age group. The results show that peer effects do exist in this European sample but that they differ among both regions and different fatness measures. Peer effects are larger in Spain, Italy, and Cyprus - the more collectivist regions in our sample - while waist circumference generally gives rise to larger peer effects than BMI. We also provide evidence that parental misperceptions of their own children's weight goes hand in hand With fatter peer groups, supporting the notion that in making such assessments, parents compare their children's weight with that of friends and schoolmates. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Peer effects, Children, Obesity, Europe
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14429 (URN)10.1016/j.ehb.2015.05.002 (DOI)000359031100011 ()26115518 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84933533168 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-11-16 Created: 2017-11-16 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Miguel Fernandez-Alvira, J., Boernhorst, C., Bammann, K., Gwozdz, W., Krogh, V., Hebestreit, A., . . . Moreno, L. A. (2015). Prospective associations between socio-economic status and dietary patterns in European children: the Identification and Prevention of Dietary- and Lifestyle-induced Health Effects in Children and Infants (IDEFICS) Study. British Journal of Nutrition, 113(3), 517-525
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prospective associations between socio-economic status and dietary patterns in European children: the Identification and Prevention of Dietary- and Lifestyle-induced Health Effects in Children and Infants (IDEFICS) Study
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2015 (English)In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 113, no 3, p. 517-525Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Exploring changes in children's diet over time and the relationship between these changes and socio-economic status (SES) may help to understand the impact of social inequalities on dietary patterns. The aim of the present study was to describe dietary patterns by applying a cluster analysis to 9301 children participating in the baseline (2-9 years old) and follow-up (4-11 years old) surveys of the Identification and Prevention of Dietary-and Lifestyle-induced Health Effects in Children and Infants Study, and to describe the cluster memberships of these children over time and their association with SES. We applied the K-means clustering algorithm based on the similarities between the relative frequencies of consumption of forty-two food items. The following three consistent clusters were obtained at baseline and follow-up: processed (higher frequency of consumption of snacks and fast food); sweet (higher frequency of consumption of sweet foods and sweetened drinks); healthy (higher frequency of consumption of fruits, vegetables and wholemeal products). Children with higher-educated mothers and fathers and the highest household income were more likely to be allocated to the healthy cluster at baseline and follow-up and less likely to be allocated to the sweet cluster. Migrants were more likely to be allocated to the processed cluster at baseline and follow-up. Applying the cluster analysis to derive dietary patterns at the two time points allowed us to identify groups of children from a lower socio-economic background presenting persistently unhealthier dietary profiles. This finding reflects the need for healthy eating interventions specifically targeting children from lower socio-economic backgrounds.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2015
Keywords
Cluster analysis, Dietary behaviour, FFQ, Income, Maternal education, Paternal education
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14432 (URN)10.1017/S0007114514003663 (DOI)000350230300014 ()25563904 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84922522259 (Scopus ID)
Note

Group Author(s): IDEFICS Consortium

Available from: 2017-11-16 Created: 2017-11-16 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Gwozdz, W., Sousa-Poza, A., Reisch, L. A., Ahrens, W., Eiben, G., Fernandez-Alvira, J. M., . . . Bammann, K. (2013). Maternal employment and childhood obesity: A European perspective. Journal of Health Economics, 32(4), 728-742
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maternal employment and childhood obesity: A European perspective
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2013 (English)In: Journal of Health Economics, ISSN 0167-6296, E-ISSN 1879-1646, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 728-742Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The substantial increase in female employment rates in Europe over the past two decades has often been linked in political and public rhetoric to negative effects on child development, including obesity. We analyse this association between maternal employment and childhood obesity using rich objective reports of various anthropometric and other measures of fatness from the IDEFICS study of children aged 2-9 in 16 regions of eight European countries. Based on such data as accelerometer measures and information from nutritional diaries, we also investigate the effects of maternal employment on obesity's main drivers: calorie intake and physical activity. Our analysis provides little evidence for any association between maternal employment and childhood obesity, diet or physical activity. (c) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
Keywords
Maternal employment, Children, Obesity, Europe
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14451 (URN)10.1016/j.jhealeco.2013.04.003 (DOI)000321729800006 ()23721884 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84878350147 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-11-16 Created: 2017-11-16 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Reeske, A., Spallek, J., Bammann, K., Eiben, G., De Henauw, S., Kourides, Y., . . . Ahrens, W. (2013). Migrant Background and Weight Gain in Early Infancy: Results from the German Study Sample of the IDEFICS Study. PLoS ONE, 8(4), Article ID e60648.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Migrant Background and Weight Gain in Early Infancy: Results from the German Study Sample of the IDEFICS Study
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2013 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 4, article id e60648Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To examine variations in infant weight gain between children of parents with and without migrant background and to investigate how these differences are explained by pre- and perinatal factors. Methods: We used data on birth weight and weight at six months from well-child check-up books that were collected from a population-based German sample of children in the IDEFICS study (n = 1,287). We calculated unadjusted and adjusted means for weight z-scores at birth and six months later. We applied linear regression for change in weight z-score and we calculated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for rapid weight gain by logistic regression, adjusted for biological, social and behavioural factors. Results: Weight z-scores for migrants and Germans differed slightly at birth, but were markedly increased for Turkish and Eastern European infants at age six months. Turkish infants showed the highest change in weight z-score during the first 6 months (beta = 0.35; 95% CI 0.14-0.56) and an increased probability of rapid weight gain compared with German infants. Examination of the joint effect of migrant and socioeconomic status (SES) showed the greatest change in weight z-scores in Turkish infants from middle SES families (beta = 0.77; 95% CI 0.40-1.14) and infants of parents from Eastern European countries with high SES (beta = 0.72; 95% CI 0.13-1.32). Conclusions: Our results support the hypothesis that migrant background is an independent risk factor for infant weight gain and suggest that the onset of health inequalities in overweight starts in early infancy.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14454 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0060648 (DOI)000319108100061 ()23593270 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84875920972 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-11-16 Created: 2017-11-16 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Miguel Fernandez-Alvira, J., Mouratidou, T., Bammann, K., Hebestreit, A., Barba, G., Sieri, S., . . . Moreno, L. A. (2013). Parental education and frequency of food consumption in European children: the IDEFICS study. Public Health Nutrition, 16(3), 487-498
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parental education and frequency of food consumption in European children: the IDEFICS study
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2013 (English)In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 487-498Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To assess the relationship between parental education level and the consumption frequency of obesity-related foods in European children. Design: The analysis was based on data from the cross-sectional baseline survey of a prospective cohort study. The effects of parental education on food consumption were explored using analysis of covariance and logistic regression. Setting: Primary schools and pre-schools of selected regions in Italy, Estonia, Cyprus, Belgium, Sweden, Hungary, Germany and Spain. Subjects: Participants (n 14 426) of the IDEFICS baseline cohort study aged 2 to 9 years. Results: Parental education level affected the intake of obesity-related foods in children. Children in the low and medium parental education level groups had lower odds of more frequently eating low-sugar and low-fat foods (vegetables, fruits, pasta/noodles/rice and wholemeal bread) and higher odds of more frequently eating high-sugar and high-fat foods (fried potatoes, fruits with sugar and nuts, snacks/desserts and sugared beverages; P<0.001). The largest odds ratio differences were found in the low category (reference category: high) for vegetables (OR=0.56; 95% CI 0.47, 0.65), fruits (OR=0.56; 95% CI 0.48, 0.65), fruits with sugar and nuts (OR=2.23; 95% CI 1.92, 2.59) and sugared beverages (OR=2.01; 95% CI 1.77, 2.37). Conclusions: Low parental education level was associated with intakes of sugar-rich and fatty foods among children, while high parental education level was associated with intakes of low-sugar and low-fat foods. These findings should be taken into account in public health interventions, with more targeted policies aiming at an improvement of children's diet.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2013
Keywords
Parental education, Children, IDEFICS study, Food consumption
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14456 (URN)10.1017/S136898001200290X (DOI)000313976700013 ()22687743 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84872902247 (Scopus ID)
Note

Group Author(s): IDEFICS Consortium

Available from: 2017-11-16 Created: 2017-11-16 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5623-8160

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