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Wiberger, M., Eiben, G., Lisner, L., Mehlig, K., Papoutsou, S. & Hunsberger, M. (2014). Children consuming milk cereal drink are at increased risk for overweight: The IDEFICS Sweden study, on behalf of the IDEFICS Consortium. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 42(6), 518-524
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children consuming milk cereal drink are at increased risk for overweight: The IDEFICS Sweden study, on behalf of the IDEFICS Consortium
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2014 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 518-524Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: The aims of this study were to characterize milk cereal drink (MCD) consumption among Swedish children and to investigate the association between MCD and overweight in a longitudinally followed cohort of children over 2 years of age. Methods: In the Swedish cohort from IDEFICS (Identification and prevention of Dietary-and lifestyle-induced health EFfects In Children and infantS) we examined early feeding practices and weight status when children were aged 2-9 years (2007/2008) and at 2-year follow-up. Weight and height were measured at both time points in 1077 children. Characteristics of MCD consumers were explored with logistic regression. Body mass index (BMI) z-scores at both time points and weight status at follow-up were regressed on explanatory factors using mixed linear and logistic regression, respectively. Results: Nearly 69% of children had consumed MCD. The MCD consumers were more likely than never-consumers to have two native Swedish parents, parents with less than 2 years of post-secondary education, and a shorter period of breastfeeding. MCD consumers had a higher BMI z-score at follow-up compared with baseline (difference in BMI z-score=0.12, 95% confidence interval (CI)= 0.07, 0.17), while the average BMI z-score in non-consumers remained stable over time (0.00, 95% CI= -0.07, 0.07). MCD consumers were nearly five times more likely than non-consumers to become overweight during the follow-up (odds ratio (OR)= 4.78, 95% CI= 1.68, 13.59), independent of breastfeeding. Conclusions: MCD was consumed by the majority of children in this study. MCD consumption is associated with an increased risk for overweight and less exposure to breastfeeding. Our findings motivate future research aimed at investigating how MCD should be recommended.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2014
Keywords
BMI z-score, breastfeeding, childhood overweight, complementary food, energy-providing liquids, IDEFICS, milk cereal drink, solid food, valling
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14441 (URN)10.1177/1403494814538124 (DOI)000340158700007 ()24947518 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84904641614 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-11-16 Created: 2017-11-16 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Hunsberger, M., Pena, P., Lissner, L., Grafstrom, L., Vanaelst, B., Boernhorst, C., . . . Eiben, G. (2013). Validity of self-reported lunch recalls in Swedish school children aged 6-8 years. Nutrition Journal, 12, Article ID 129.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validity of self-reported lunch recalls in Swedish school children aged 6-8 years
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2013 (English)In: Nutrition Journal, ISSN 1475-2891, E-ISSN 1475-2891, Vol. 12, article id 129Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Previous studies have suggested that young children are inaccurate reporters of dietary intake. The purpose of this study was to validate a single recall of the previous day's school lunch reported by 6-8 year old Swedish children and to assess teacher-recorded intake of the same meal in a standardized food journal. An additional research question was whether parents could report their child's intake of the previous day's lunch. Subjects constituted a convenience sample from the large, multi-country study Identification and prevention of Dietary-and lifestyle-induced health EFfects In Children and infantS (IDEFICS). Validations of both children's recalls and teachers' records were made by comparing results with the duplicate plate reference method. Findings: Twenty-five children (12 boys/13 girls) aged 6-8 years participated in the validation study at one school in western Sweden. Children were accurate self-reporters of their dietary intake at lunch, with no significant difference between reported and weighed intake (Mean difference (SD): 7(50) kcals, p=0.49). Teachers significantly over-reported intake (Mean difference (SD): 65(79) kcals, p=0.01). For both methods, child-reported and teacher-recorded, correlations with weighed intake were strong (Pearson's correlations r=0.92, p<0.001 and r=0.83, p<0.001 respectively). Bland-Altman plots showed strong agreement between child-reported and weighed intakes but confirmed systematic differences between teacher-records and weighed intakes. Foods were recalled by children with a food-match rate of 90%. In all cases parents themselves were unable to report on quantities consumed and only four of 25 children had parents with knowledge regarding food items consumed. Conclusions: Children 6-8 years of age accurately recalled their school lunch intake for one occasion while teachers recorded with less accuracy. Our findings suggest that children as young as six years of age may be better able to report on their dietary intake than previously suggested, at least for one main meal at school. Teacher-recorded intake provides a satisfactory estimate but with greater systematic deviation from the weighed intake. Parents were not able to report on their children's school lunches consumed on the previous day.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2013
Keywords
Dietary intake, 24-hour recall, Child reported dietary intake, Relative validation
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14450 (URN)10.1186/1475-2891-12-129 (DOI)000325210200001 ()24047239 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84884195165 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-11-16 Created: 2017-11-16 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1779-1286

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