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Huang, C. Y., Reisch, L. A., Gwozdz, W., Molnar, D., Konstabel, K., Michels, N., . . . Lissner, L. (2016). Pester power and its consequences: do European children's food purchasing requests relate to diet and weight outcomes?. Public Health Nutrition, 19(13), 2393-2403
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pester power and its consequences: do European children's food purchasing requests relate to diet and weight outcomes?
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2016 (English)In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 19, no 13, p. 2393-2403Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective Children may influence household spending through pester power'. The present study examined pestering through parent-child food shopping behaviours in relation to children's diet and weight status. Design Cross-sectional and prospective analyses drawn from the IDEFICS study, a cohort study of parents and their children. Children's height and weight were measured and their recent diets were reported by parental proxy based on the Children's Eating Habits Questionnaire-FFQ at baseline and 2-year follow-up. Parents also completed questionnaires at both time points about pestering, including whether the child goes grocery shopping with them, asks for items seen on television and is bought requested food items. Setting Participants were recruited from eight European countries for the IDEFICS study (non-nationally representative sample). Subjects Study participants were children aged 2-9 years at enrolment and their parents. A total of 13 217 parent-child dyads were included at baseline. Two years later, 7820 of the children were re-examined. Results Most parents (63 %) at baseline reported sometimes' acquiescing to their children's requests to purchase specific foods. Pestering was modestly associated with weight and diet. At baseline, children whose parents often' complied consumed more high-sugar and high-fat foods. Children who often' asked for items seen on television were likely to become overweight after 2 years (OR=1<bold></bold>31), whereas never' asking protected against overweight (OR=0<bold></bold>72). Conclusions Pestering was modestly related to diet and weight in cross-sectional, but not longitudinal analyses. Asking for items seen on television had the most robust relationships across child outcomes and over time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2016
Keywords
Children, Obesity, Weight, Marketing
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14412 (URN)10.1017/S136898001600135X (DOI)000382889000012 ()27297518 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84976603859 (Scopus ID)
Note

Group Author(s): IDEFICS Consortium

Available from: 2017-11-16 Created: 2017-11-16 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Van den Bussche, K., Michels, N., Gracia-Marco, L., Herrmann, D., Eiben, G., De Henauw, S. & Sioen, I. (2012). Influence of Birth Weight on Calcaneal Bone Stiffness in Belgian Preadolescent Children. Calcified Tissue International, 91(4), 267-275
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of Birth Weight on Calcaneal Bone Stiffness in Belgian Preadolescent Children
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2012 (English)In: Calcified Tissue International, ISSN 0171-967X, E-ISSN 1432-0827, Vol. 91, no 4, p. 267-275Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between birth weight and calcaneal bone stiffness in a large sample of Belgian, healthy, preadolescent children. Participants were 827 children (3.6-11.2 years, 51.6 % boys) from the Belgian cohort of the IDEFICS study. Birth weight was obtained using a parental questionnaire, and quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measurements were performed to determine calcaneal broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA), speed of sound (SOS), and stiffness index (SI) using the Lunar Achilles device. Average birth weights were 3435.7 +/- A 512.0 g for boys and 3256.9 +/- A 471.1 g for girls. Average calcaneal QUS measurements were 89.6 +/- A 24.0 (23.3-153.9) dB/MHz for BUA, 1621.4 +/- A 49.6 (1516.3-1776.5) m/s for SOS, and 92.8 +/- A 15.6 (49.0-163.0) for SI. Birth weight was positively associated with BUA (r = 0.13, p = 0.002) and SOS (r = -0.16, p < 0.001). The associations remained after correcting for age and sex in multiple regression analyses but disappeared after correcting for anthropometric covariates. Our findings suggest that birth weight, as a rough proxy indicator for genetic and environmental influences during intrauterine life, is associated with BUA and SOS in preadolescent children and may therefore influence the risk of osteoporosis later in life. Further studies using QUS are needed to investigate the consistency of the results of this study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2012
Keywords
Birth weight, Children, Calcaneal quantitative ultrasound, Bone stiffness
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14462 (URN)10.1007/s00223-012-9636-z (DOI)000308332000005 ()22911000 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84866024501 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-11-16 Created: 2017-11-16 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Michels, N., Sioen, I., Braet, C., Eiben, G., Hebestreit, A., Huybrechts, I., . . . De Henauw, S. (2012). Stress, emotional eating behaviour and dietary patterns in children. Appetite, 59(3), 762-769
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stress, emotional eating behaviour and dietary patterns in children
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2012 (English)In: Appetite, ISSN 0195-6663, E-ISSN 1095-8304, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 762-769Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Psychological stress has been suggested to change dietary pattern towards more unhealthy choices and as such to contribute to overweight. Emotional eating behaviour could be an underlying mediating mechanism. The interrelationship between stress, emotional eating behaviour and dietary patterns has only rarely been examined in young children. Nevertheless, research in children is pivotal as the foundations of dietary habits are established starting from childhood and may track into adulthood. In 437 children (5-12 years) of the ChiBS study, stress was measured by questionnaires on stressful events, emotions (happy, angry, sad, anxious) and problems (emotional, peer, conduct and hyperactivity). Data were collected on children's emotional eating behaviour and also on dietary patterns: frequency of fatty foods, sweet foods, snacks (fat and sweet), fruit and vegetables. Stressful events, negative emotions and problems were positively associated with emotional eating. Positive associations were observed between problems and both sweet and fatty foods consumption. Negative associations were observed between events and fruit and vegetables consumption. Overall, stress was associated with emotional eating and a more unhealthy dietary pattern and could thus contribute to the development of overweight, also in children. Nevertheless, emotional eating behaviour was not observed to mediate the stress-diet relation. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD, 2012
Keywords
Children, Stress, Diet, Eating behaviour, Emotional eating
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14461 (URN)10.1016/j.appet.2012.08.010 (DOI)000311134900019 ()22918173 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84865961599 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-11-16 Created: 2017-11-16 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3069-7254

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