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Holmström, Kjell-Ove
Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Karlsson, S., Olausson, J., Lundh, D., Sögård, P., Mandal, A., Holmström, K.-O., . . . Larsson, D. (2010). Vitamin D and prostate cancer: The role of membrane initiated signaling pathways in prostate cancer progression. Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 121(1-2), 413-416
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vitamin D and prostate cancer: The role of membrane initiated signaling pathways in prostate cancer progression
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2010 (English)In: Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, ISSN 0960-0760, E-ISSN 1879-1220, Vol. 121, no 1-2, p. 413-416Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) has been demonstrated to mediate both genomic and non-genomic responses in prostate cancer (CaP) cells. Here, we give an overview of membrane initiated 1,25(OH)2D3 signaling in prostate cancer cell progression. The presence of PDIA3 was investigated and homologous modeling of the putative PDIA3 receptor complex was conducted. Furthermore, the cellular distribution of nVDR was analyzed. We could show that both nVDR and PDIA3 are expressed in the prostate cancer cell lines investigated. The homologous modeling of PDIA3 showed that the receptor complex exists in a trimer formation, which suggests for allosteric activity. Our findings support previous reports and suggest that 1,25(OH)2D3 is an important therapeutic agent in inhibiting prostate cancer progression. Furthermore, our data show that 1,25(OH)2D3 regulate prostate cell biology via multiple pathways and targeting specific pathways for 1,25(OH)2D3 might provide more effective therapies compared to the vitamin D therapies currently clinically tested.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2010
Keywords
1, 25(OH)2D3, Prostate cancer, Membrane receptors, PDIA3, nVDR, Receptor modeling
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Natural sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-4528 (URN)10.1016/j.jsbmb.2010.03.083 (DOI)000280600200091 ()20398754 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-77954760891 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-01-03 Created: 2011-01-03 Last updated: 2017-12-20Bibliographically approved
Karim, S., Holmström, K.-O., Mandal, A., Dahl, P., Hoffmann, S., Brader, G., . . . Pirhonen, M. (2007). AtPTR3, a wound-induced peptide transporter needed for defence against virulent bacterial pathogens in Arabidopsis. Planta, 225(6), 1431-1445
Open this publication in new window or tab >>AtPTR3, a wound-induced peptide transporter needed for defence against virulent bacterial pathogens in Arabidopsis
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2007 (English)In: Planta, ISSN 0032-0935, E-ISSN 1432-2048, Vol. 225, no 6, p. 1431-1445Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mutation in the wound-induced peptide transporter gene AtPTR3 (At5g46050) of Arabidopsis thaliana has been shown to affect germination on media containing a high salt concentration. The heterologous expression in yeast was utilized to verify that the AtPTR3 protein transports di-and tripeptides. The T-DNA insert in the Atptr3-1 mutant in the Arabidopsis ecotype C24 revealed two T-DNA copies, the whole vector sequence, and the gus marker gene inserted in the second intron of the AtPTR3 gene. An almost identical insertion site was found in the Atptr3-2 mutant of the Col-0 ecotype. The AtPTR3 expression was shown to be regulated by several signalling compounds, most clearly by salicylic acid (SA), but also methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and abscisic acid. Real-time PCR experiments suggested that the wound-induction of the AtPTR3 gene was abolished in the SA and JA signalling mutants. The Atptr3 mutant plants had increased susceptibility to virulent pathogenic bacteria Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, and produced more reactive oxygen species when grown on media containing paraquat or rose bengal. Public microarray data suggest that the AtPTR3 expression was induced by Pseudomonas elicitors and by avirulent P. syringae pathovars and type III secretion mutants. This was verified experimentally for the hrpA mutant with real-time PCR. These results suggest that AtPTR3 is one of the defence-related genes whose expression is reduced by virulent bacterium by type III dependent fashion. Our results suggest that AtPTR3 protects the plant against biotic and abiotic stresses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2007
Keywords
Defence mechanisms, Jasmonic acid, Peptide transporter, Plant pathogens, Salicylic acid, Wounding
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-2036 (URN)10.1007/s00425-006-0451-5 (DOI)000245852700009 ()17143616 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-34247352031 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2008-05-09 Created: 2008-05-09 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Karim, S., Aronsson, H., Ericson, H., Pirhonen, M., Leyman, B., Welin, B., . . . Holmström, K.-O. (2007). Improved drought tolerance without undesired side effects in transgenic plants producing trehalose. Plant Molecular Biology, 64(4), 371-386
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improved drought tolerance without undesired side effects in transgenic plants producing trehalose
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2007 (English)In: Plant Molecular Biology, ISSN 0167-4412, E-ISSN 1573-5028, Vol. 64, no 4, p. 371-386Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Most organisms naturally accumulating trehalose upon stress produce the sugar in a two-step process by the action of the enzymes trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS) and trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (TPP). Transgenic plants overexpressing TPS have shown enhanced drought tolerance in spite of minute accumulation of trehalose, amounts believed to be too small to provide a protective function. However, overproduction of TPS in plants has also been found combined with pleiotropic growth aberrations. This paper describes three successful strategies to circumvent such growth defects without loosing the improved stress tolerance. First, we introduced into tobacco a double construct carrying the genes TPS1 and TPS2 (encoding TPP) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both genes are regulated by an Arabidopsis RuBisCO promoter from gene AtRbcS1A giving constitutive production of both enzymes. The second strategy involved stress-induced expression by fusing the coding region of ScTPS1 downstream of the drought-inducible Arabidopsis AtRAB18 promoter. In transgenic tobacco plants harbouring genetic constructs with either ScTPS1 alone, or with ScTPS1 and ScTPS2 combined, trehalose biosynthesis was turned on only when the plants experienced stress. The third strategy involved the use of AtRbcS]A promoter together with a transit peptide in front of the coding sequence of ScTPS1, which directed the enzyme to the chloroplasts. This paper confirms that the enhanced drought tolerance depends on unknown ameliorated water retention as the initial water status is the same in control and transgenic plants and demonstrates the influence of expression of heterologous trehalose biosynthesis genes on Arabidopsis root development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2007
Keywords
abiotic stress, arabidopsis, improved stress tolerance, tobacco, trehalose, trehalose-6-phosphate
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Natural sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-6893 (URN)10.1007/s11103-007-9159-6 (DOI)000247347200003 ()17453154 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-34249786589 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-12-07 Created: 2012-12-07 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Bergman, A., Fernandez, V., Holmström, K.-O., Claesson, B. E. & Enroth, H. (2007). Rapid identification of pathogenic yeast isolates bt real-time PCR and two-dimensional melting-point analysis. European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, 26(11), 813-818
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rapid identification of pathogenic yeast isolates bt real-time PCR and two-dimensional melting-point analysis
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2007 (English)In: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0934-9723, E-ISSN 1435-4373, Vol. 26, no 11, p. 813-818Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a need in the clinical microbiological laboratory for rapid and reliable methods for the universal identification of fungal pathogens. Two different regions of the rDNA gene complex, the highly polymorphic ITS1 and ITS2, were amplified using primers targeting conserved regions of the 18S, 5.8S and 28S genes. After melting-point analysis of the amplified products, the Tm of the two PCR-products were plotted into a spot diagram where all the 14 tested, clinically relevant yeasts separated with good resolution. Real-time amplification of two separate genes, melting-point analysis and two-dimensional plotting of Tm data can be used as a broad-range method for the identification of clinical isolates of pathogenic yeast such as Candida and Cryptococcus spp.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2007
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Natural sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-3290 (URN)10.1007/s10096-007-0369-2 (DOI)000250117400008 ()17680284 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-35348856317 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2009-07-09 Created: 2009-07-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Karim, S., Lundh, D., Holmström, K.-O., Mandal, A. & Pirhonen, M. (2005). Structural and functional characterization of atPTR3, a stress-induced peptide transporter of Arabidopsis. Journal of Molecular Modeling, 11(3), 226-236
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Structural and functional characterization of atPTR3, a stress-induced peptide transporter of Arabidopsis
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2005 (English)In: Journal of Molecular Modeling, ISSN 1610-2940, E-ISSN 0948-5023, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 226-236Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A T-DNA tagged mutant line of Arabidopsis thaliana, produced with a promoter trap vector carrying a promoterless gus (uidA) as a reporter gene, showed GUS induction in response to mechanical wounding. Cloning of the chromosomal DNA flanking the T-DNA revealed that the insert had caused a knockout mutation in a PTR-type peptide transporter gene named At5g46050 in GenBank, here renamed AtPTR3. The gene and the deduced protein were characterized by molecular modelling and bioinformatics. Molecular modelling of the protein with fold recognition identified 12 transmembrane spanning regions and a large loop between the sixth and seventh helices. The structure of AtPTR3 resembled the other PTR-type transporters of plants and transporters in the major facilitator superfamily. Computer analysis of the AtPTR3 promoter suggested its expression in roots, leaves and seeds, complex hormonal regulation and induction by abiotic and biotic stresses. The computer-based hypotheses were tested experimentally by exposing the mutant plants to amino acids and several stress treatments. The AtPTR3 gene was induced by the amino acids histidine, leucine and phenylalanine in cotyledons and lower leaves, whereas a strong induction was obtained in the whole plant upon exposure to salt. Furthermore, the germination frequency of the mutant line was reduced on salt-containing media, suggesting that the AtPTR3 protein is involved in stress tolerance in seeds during germination.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2005
Keywords
Promoter trapping, Fold recognition, Peptide transporter, Wounding, Salt stress, Arabidopsis
National Category
Botany
Research subject
Natural sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-2381 (URN)10.1007/s00894-005-0257-6 (DOI)000230142000006 ()15889294 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-22144460144 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2008-11-25 Created: 2008-11-25 Last updated: 2017-12-20Bibliographically approved
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