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Sahlsten, Monika J. M.ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2673-7743
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Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Larsson, I. E. & Sahlsten, M. J. M. (2016). The Staff Nurse Clinical Leader at the Bedside: Swedish Registered Nurses' Perceptions. Nursing Research and Practice, Article ID 1797014.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Staff Nurse Clinical Leader at the Bedside: Swedish Registered Nurses' Perceptions
2016 (English)In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, article id 1797014Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Registered nurses at the bedside are accountable for and oversee completion of patient care as well as directly leading and managing the provision of safe patient care. These nurses have an informal leadership role that is not associated with any given position. Leadership is a complex and multifaceted concept and its meaning is unclear, especially in the staff nurse context. The aim was to describe registered nurses’ perceptions of what it entails to be the leader at the bedside in inpatient physical care. A phenomenographic approach was employed. Interviews were performed with Swedish registered nurses (n=15). Five descriptive categories were identified: demonstrating clinical knowledge, establishing a good atmosphere of collaboration, consciously structuring the work in order to ensure patients’ best possible nursing care, customized presence in the practical work with patients according to predetermined prerequisites, and monitoring coworkers’ professional practice. Registered nurses informal role as leader necessitates a social process of deliberate effort to attain and maintain leader status and authority. Participants used deliberate communicative approaches and interactive procedures. Leader principles grounded in the core values of the nursing profession that ensure nursing values and person-centered attributes were a key aspect.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2016
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-13315 (URN)10.1155/2016/1797014 (DOI)000390467500001 ()28044103 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-01-16 Created: 2017-01-13 Last updated: 2018-02-26Bibliographically approved
Larsson, I. E., Sahlsten, M. J. M., Segesten, K. & Plos, K. A. E. (2011). Patients' perceptions of barriers for participation in nursing care. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 25(3), 575-582
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients' perceptions of barriers for participation in nursing care
2011 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 575-582Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:  In many Western countries as in Sweden, patients have legal right to participate in own care individually adjusted to each patient’s wishes and abilities. There are still few empirical studies of patients’ perceptions of barriers for participation. Accordingly, there is a need to identify what may prevent patients from playing an active role in own nursing care. Such knowledge is highly valuable for the nursing profession when it comes to implementation of individual patient participation.

Aim and objective:  To explore barriers for patient participation in nursing care with a special focus on adult patients with experience of inpatient physical care.

Methodological design and justification:  Data were collected through 6 focus groups with 26 Swedish informants recruited from physical inpatient care as well as discharged patients from such a setting. A content analysis with qualitative approach of the tape-recorded interview material was made.

Ethical issues and approval:  The ethics of scientific work was adhered to. Each study participant gave informed consent after verbal and written information. The Ethics Committee of Göteborg University approved the study.

Results:  The barriers for patient participation were identified as four categories: Facing own inability, meeting lack of empathy, meeting a paternalistic attitude and sensing structural barriers, and their 10 underlying subcategories.

Conclusions:  Our study contributes knowledge and understanding of patients’ experiences of barriers for participation. The findings point to remaining structures and nurse attitudes that are of disadvantage for patients’ participation. The findings may increase the understanding of patient participation and may serve as an incentive in practice and nursing education to meet and eliminate these barriers, in quality assurance of care, work organization and further research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nordic College of Caring Sciences, 2011
Keywords
barriers, focus groups, hindrance, nursing care, patient participation
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-5110 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-6712.2010.00866.x (DOI)000293756500021 ()21241347 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-80051565363 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-06-21 Created: 2011-06-21 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Larsson, I. E., Sahlsten, M. J. M., Segesten, K. & Plos, K. A. E. (2011). Patients' Perceptions of Nurses' Behaviour That Influence Patient Participation in Nursing Care: A Critical Incident Study. Nursing Research and Practice, Article ID 534060.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients' Perceptions of Nurses' Behaviour That Influence Patient Participation in Nursing Care: A Critical Incident Study
2011 (English)In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, article id 534060Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Patient participation is an important basis for nursing care and medical treatment and is a legal right in many Western countries. Studies have established that patients consider participation to be both obvious and important, but there are also findings showing the opposite and patients often prefer a passive recipient role. Knowledge of what may influence patients' participation is thus of great importance. The aim was to identify incidents and nurses' behaviours that influence patients' participation in nursing care based on patients' experiences from inpatient somatic care. The Critical Incident Technique (CIT) was employed. Interviews were performed with patients (𝑛=17), recruited from somatic inpatient care at an internal medical clinic in West Sweden. This study provided a picture of incidents, nurses' behaviours that stimulate or inhibit patients' participation, and patient reactions on nurses' behaviours. Incidents took place during medical ward round, nursing ward round, information session, nursing documentation, drug administration, and meal.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2011
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-5611 (URN)10.1155/2011/534060 (DOI)
Available from: 2012-03-19 Created: 2012-03-19 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Sahlsten, M. J. M., Larsson, I. E., Sjöström, B. & Plos, K. A. E. (2009). Nurse strategies for optimising patient participation in nursing care. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 23(3), 490-497
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurse strategies for optimising patient participation in nursing care
2009 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 490-497Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study's rationale: Patient participation is an essential factor in nursing care and medical treatment and a legal right in many countries. Despite this, patients have experienced insufficient participation, inattention and neglect regarding their problems and may respond with dependence, passivity or taciturnity. Accordingly, nurses strategies for optimising patient participation in nursing care is an important question for the nursing profession. Aim and objective: The aim was to explore Registered Nurses' strategies to stimulate and optimise patient participation in nursing care. The objective was to identify ward nurses' supporting practices. Methodological design and justification: A qualitative research approach was applied. Three focus groups with experienced Registered Nurses providing inpatient somatic care (n = 16) were carried out. These nurses were recruited from three hospitals in West Sweden. The data were analysed using content analysis technique. Ethical issues and approval: The ethics of scientific work was adhered to. According to national Swedish legislation, no formal permit from an ethics committee was required. The participants gave informed consent after verbal and written information. Results: Nurse strategies for optimising patient participation in nursing care were identified as three categories: 'Building close co-operation', 'Getting to know the person' and 'Reinforcing self-care capacity' and their 10 subcategories. Conclusions: The strategies point to a process of emancipation of the patient's potential by finding his/her own inherent knowledge, values, motivation and goals and linking these to actions. Nurses need to strive for guiding the patient towards attaining meaningful experiences, discoveries, learning and development. The strategies are important and useful to balance the asymmetry in the nurse-patient relationship in daily nursing practice and also in quality assurance to evaluate and improve patient participation and in education. However, further verification of the findings is recommended by means of replication or other studies in different clinical settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2009
Keywords
focus group, nurse/nursing, patient participation, user involvement
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-6936 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-6712.2008.00649.x (DOI)000268960400010 ()19552793 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-68949086349 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-12-19 Created: 2012-12-19 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Sahlsten, M., Larsson, I. E., Sjöström, B. & Plos, K. A. E. (2008). An Analysis of the Concept of Patient Participation. Nursing Forum, 43(1), 2-11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Analysis of the Concept of Patient Participation
2008 (English)In: Nursing Forum, ISSN 1744-6198, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 2-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The concept of patient participation has an array of interpretations and lacks clarity. The purpose of this article is to explore the concept of patient participation within the context of nursing practice. The method described by Walker and Avant (1995) is used. The critical attributes of the concept are identified. Formation of model, borderline, and contrary cases exemplifies key characteristics. Antecedents, consequences, and empirical referents presented allow for further refinement of the key attributes defining the concept. Patient participation in nursing practice can be defined as an established relationship between nurse and patient, a surrendering of some power or control by the nurse, shared information and knowledge, and active engagement together in intellectual and/or physical activities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2008
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-2728 (URN)10.1111/j.1744-6198.2008.00090.x (DOI)18269439 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-42949097484 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2009-02-11 Created: 2009-02-11 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Larsson, I. E., Sahlsten, M. J. M., Sjöström, B., Lindencrona, C. S. C. & Plos, K. A. E. (2007). Patient participation in nursing care from a patient perspective: a Grounded Theory study. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 21(3), 313-320
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patient participation in nursing care from a patient perspective: a Grounded Theory study
Show others...
2007 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 313-320Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study's rationale: Patients’ active participation in their own care is expected to contribute to increased motivation to improve their own condition, better treatment results and greater satisfaction with received care. Knowledge of patients’ understanding of participation is of great importance for nurses in their efforts to meet patient expectations and for quality of nursing care.

Aim: The aim was to explore the meaning of patient participation in nursing care from a patient point of view.

Methodological design and justification: Six tape-recorded focus group interviews with 26 Swedish informants described opinions on and experiences of patient participation. The informants consisted of patients in somatic inpatient care as well as discharged patients from such a setting. The Grounded Theory method was used and the data were analysed using constant comparative analysis.

Ethical issues and approval: The ethics of scientific work was followed. Each study participant gave informed consent after verbal and written information. The Ethics Committee of Göteborg University approved the study.

Findings: The patients emphasised the importance of collaboration to improve participation. The core category, Insight through consideration, was generated from four inter-related categories: (i) Obliging atmosphere; (ii) Emotional response; (iii) Concordance; and (iv) Rights and their 15 subcategories.

Conclusions: The meaning structures of patient participation in nursing care revealed from a patient point of view, seemed to mainly consist of not only external factors presented by the institutions – by the professionals – but also internal patient factors. The patients’ view of participation should be considered to a greater degree in nursing practice and education, as should also further development of nursing care policy programmes, evaluation and quality assurance criteria. For further development, studies are needed in similar and other settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2007
Keywords
focus group, Grounded Theory, nurse/nursing, patient participation
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-2178 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-6712.2007.00471.x (DOI)000249423800006 ()17727543 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-34548283021 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2008-06-12 Created: 2008-06-12 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Sahlsten, M. J. M., Larsson, I. E., Sjöström, B., Lindencrona, C. S. C. & Plos, K. A. E. (2007). Patient participation in nursing care: towards a concept clarification from a nurse perspective. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 16(4), 630-637
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patient participation in nursing care: towards a concept clarification from a nurse perspective
Show others...
2007 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 630-637Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim. The aim of this study was to investigate the meanings of the concept of patient participation in nursing care from a nurse perspective.

Background. Participation is essential and increases patients’ motivation and satisfaction with received care. Studies of patient participation in nursing care are not congruent regarding definition, elements and processes. This lack of clarity is amplified by several terms used; patient/client/consumer involvement or collaboration, partnership and influence. Despite the fact that several nursing theories have emphasized the importance of patient participation, an empirically grounded theory has yet to be published.

Methods. Seven focus group interviews were held with nurses providing inpatient physical care at five hospitals in West Sweden. The focus groups consisted of Registered Swedish nurses (n = 31) who described the meaning and implementation of patient participation in nursing care. A Grounded Theory approach has been applied to tape-recorded data. Constant comparative analysis was used and saturation was achieved.

Results. Mutuality in negotiation emerged as the core category for explaining nurses’ perspectives on patient participation in nursing care. It is characterized by four interrelated sub-core categories: interpersonal procedure, therapeutic approach, focus on resources and opportunities for influence. Mutuality in negotiation constitutes the dynamic nurse–patient interaction process.

Conclusions. The study clarifies that patient participation can be explained as an interactional process identified as mutuality in negotiation based on four components.

Relevance to clinical practice. The results are important and can be used in nursing practice and education. Application in a clinical context means nursing care organized to include all the components presented. The results can also be used in quality assurance to improve and evaluate patient participation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2007
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-2180 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2702.2006.01660.x (DOI)000245312200004 ()17402943 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-34047181546 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2008-06-12 Created: 2008-06-12 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2673-7743

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