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Sjöström, Björn
Publications (10 of 31) Show all publications
Sahlsten, M. J. M., Larsson, I. E., Sjöström, B. & Plos, K. A. E. (2009). Nurse strategies for optimising patient participation in nursing care. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 23(3), 490-497
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurse strategies for optimising patient participation in nursing care
2009 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 490-497Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study's rationale: Patient participation is an essential factor in nursing care and medical treatment and a legal right in many countries. Despite this, patients have experienced insufficient participation, inattention and neglect regarding their problems and may respond with dependence, passivity or taciturnity. Accordingly, nurses strategies for optimising patient participation in nursing care is an important question for the nursing profession. Aim and objective: The aim was to explore Registered Nurses' strategies to stimulate and optimise patient participation in nursing care. The objective was to identify ward nurses' supporting practices. Methodological design and justification: A qualitative research approach was applied. Three focus groups with experienced Registered Nurses providing inpatient somatic care (n = 16) were carried out. These nurses were recruited from three hospitals in West Sweden. The data were analysed using content analysis technique. Ethical issues and approval: The ethics of scientific work was adhered to. According to national Swedish legislation, no formal permit from an ethics committee was required. The participants gave informed consent after verbal and written information. Results: Nurse strategies for optimising patient participation in nursing care were identified as three categories: 'Building close co-operation', 'Getting to know the person' and 'Reinforcing self-care capacity' and their 10 subcategories. Conclusions: The strategies point to a process of emancipation of the patient's potential by finding his/her own inherent knowledge, values, motivation and goals and linking these to actions. Nurses need to strive for guiding the patient towards attaining meaningful experiences, discoveries, learning and development. The strategies are important and useful to balance the asymmetry in the nurse-patient relationship in daily nursing practice and also in quality assurance to evaluate and improve patient participation and in education. However, further verification of the findings is recommended by means of replication or other studies in different clinical settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2009
Keywords
focus group, nurse/nursing, patient participation, user involvement
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-6936 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-6712.2008.00649.x (DOI)000268960400010 ()19552793 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-68949086349 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-12-19 Created: 2012-12-19 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Sahlsten, M., Larsson, I. E., Sjöström, B. & Plos, K. A. E. (2008). An Analysis of the Concept of Patient Participation. Nursing Forum, 43(1), 2-11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Analysis of the Concept of Patient Participation
2008 (English)In: Nursing Forum, ISSN 1744-6198, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 2-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The concept of patient participation has an array of interpretations and lacks clarity. The purpose of this article is to explore the concept of patient participation within the context of nursing practice. The method described by Walker and Avant (1995) is used. The critical attributes of the concept are identified. Formation of model, borderline, and contrary cases exemplifies key characteristics. Antecedents, consequences, and empirical referents presented allow for further refinement of the key attributes defining the concept. Patient participation in nursing practice can be defined as an established relationship between nurse and patient, a surrendering of some power or control by the nurse, shared information and knowledge, and active engagement together in intellectual and/or physical activities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2008
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-2728 (URN)10.1111/j.1744-6198.2008.00090.x (DOI)18269439 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-42949097484 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2009-02-11 Created: 2009-02-11 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Wickström Ene, K., Nordberg, G., Bergh, I., Gaston Johansson, F. & Sjöström, B. (2008). Postoperative pain management - the influence of surgical ward nurses. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 17(15), 2042-2050
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Postoperative pain management - the influence of surgical ward nurses
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2008 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 17, no 15, p. 2042-2050Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim. To compare pain levels reported by patients with those documented by ward nurses and to find out to what extent the amount of opioids given correlated with the pain level. Secondly, to study if pain management and nurses' approaches to this task had improved during a two-year period, including an educational pain treatment program for ward staff. Background. The management of postoperative pain continues to remain problematic and unsatisfactory and ward nurses play an important role for this task. Design. The study was a cross-sectional, descriptive, two-part study based on survey data from both patients and nurses on two urology surgical wards. Methods. Part I of the study included 77 patients and 19 nurses. Part II took place approximately two years later and included 141 patients and 22 nurses. Data were collected the day after surgery by asking patients about 'worst pain' experienced. The pain scores given by the patients were compared with those documented in the patients' records and with the doses of opioids administered. Nurses' approaches to pain management were sought after, by using a categorical questionnaire. Results. The nurses' ability to assess pain in accordance with the patients' reports had increased slightly after two years even if and the number of documented pain scores had decreased. Forty per cent of the nurses reported that they did not use visual analogue scale and that they did not assess pain at both rest and activity, neither did one fourth evaluate the effect of given analgesics. Conclusion. The study showed a discrepancy in pain scoring between nurses and patients, where active treatment was related to nurses' documentation rather than to patients' scoring. Relevance to clinical practice. The study shows a need for more accurate pain assessment, since the patient experiences and suffers pain and the nurse determines upon treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2008
Keywords
nurses, nursing, pain assessment, pain documentation, pain medication, postoperative pain
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-6980 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2702.2008.02278.x (DOI)000257664000009 ()18705781 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-47349113440 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-01-07 Created: 2013-01-07 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Wickström Ene, K., Nordberg, G., Sjöström, B. & Bergh, I. (2008). Prediction of postoperative pain after radical prostatectomy. BMC Nursing, 7(14)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prediction of postoperative pain after radical prostatectomy
2008 (English)In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 7, no 14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: There is a belief that the amount of pain perceived is merely directly proportional to the extent of injury. The intensity of postoperative pain is however influenced by multiple factors aside from the extent of trauma.The purpose of the study was to evaluate the relationship between preoperative factors that have been shown to predict postoperative pain and the self- reports of pain intensity in a population of 155 men undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP), and also to investigate if previous pain score could predict the subsequent pain score.Methods: The correlation between potential pain predictors and the postoperative pain experiences during three postoperative days was tested (Pitmans´ test). By use of a logistic regression analysis the probability that a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score at one occasion would exceed 30mm or 70mm was studied, depending on previous VAS score, age, depression and pain treatment method.Results: Age was found to be a predictor of VAS >30mm, with younger patients at higher risk for pain, and preoperative depression predicted VAS >70mm. The probability that VAS would exceed 30mm and 70mm was predicted only by previous VAS value. Day two however, patients with epidural analgesia were at higher risk for experiencing pain than patients with intrathecal or systemic opioid analgesia.Conclusion: The results show that it would be meaningful to identify RP patients at high risk for severe postoperative pain; i.e. younger and/or depressive patients who might benefit from a more aggressive therapy instituted in the very early postoperative period.

 

 

 

 

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2008
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-2872 (URN)10.1186/1472-6955-7-14 (DOI)19068111 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-60549114711 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2009-03-18 Created: 2009-03-18 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Bergh, I., Jakobsson, E. & Sjöström, B. (2008). Worst experiences of pain and conceptions of worst pain imaginable among nursing students. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 61(5), 484-491
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Worst experiences of pain and conceptions of worst pain imaginable among nursing students
2008 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 61, no 5, p. 484-491Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper is a report of a study to explore nursing students' own worst experiences of pain as well as their conceptions of the worst pain imaginable. Background.

Pain is a personal experience, often assessed using a visual analogue scale. The endpoints of this scale are labelled with the extremes for pain experience (e.g. no pain to worst pain imaginable). People may understand the meaning of `no pain', but it is unclear what meaning they assign to `worst pain imaginable'. This indicates that a rating along the Visual Analogue Scale-line is dependent on the individual's previous experiences. Methods. Data were collected during the autumn of 2002. In total, 549 nursing students completed a questionnaire focusing on two main questions: `What is the worst experience of hurt, ache or pain you have had?' and `What is the worst pain imaginable for you?' Content analysis was used for data analysis. Results. The students' worst experience of pain was mostly related to acute or traumatic painful conditions, pain associated with female physiology, inflicted pain, psychological suffering and chronic painful conditions. The worst pain imaginable was described as condition-related pain, overwhelming pain, experiences of losses, deliberately inflicted pain, psychological suffering and as vicarious pain. Conclusion. The findings imply that nursing students, when they are imagining pain, include dimensions such as hope of relief, grief, control over the situation, powerlessness and empathy for and suffer with other people's pain. Further research is needed to explore why professional experience as a nurse diminishes the ability to imagine patients' pain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2008
Keywords
bodily pain, emotional distress, empathy, nursing students, pain, questionnaire
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-2724 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2648.2007.04506.x (DOI)000253673300003 ()18261057 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-38849191775 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2009-02-11 Created: 2009-02-11 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
Johansson, A., Odén, A., Dahlgren, L.-O. & Sjöström, B. (2007). A comparison of experiences of training emergency care in military exercises and competences among conscript nurses with different levels of education. Military medicine, 172(10), 1046-1052
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comparison of experiences of training emergency care in military exercises and competences among conscript nurses with different levels of education
2007 (English)In: Military medicine, ISSN 0026-4075, E-ISSN 1930-613X, Vol. 172, no 10, p. 1046-1052Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The military emergency care education of nurses is primarily concerned with the treatment of soldiers with combat-related injuries. Even though great progress has been made in military medicine, there is still the pedagogical question of what emergency care education for military nurses should contain and how it should be taught. The aim of this study was to describe and compare experiences of training emergency care in military exercises among conscript nurses with different levels of education. A descriptive study was performed to describe and compare experiences of training emergency care in military exercises among conscript nurses with different levels of education in nursing. There were statistical differences between nurses with general nursing education and nurses with a general nursing education and supplementary education. A reasonable implication of the differences is that the curriculum must be designed differently depending on the educational background of the students. Hence, there is an interaction between background characteristics, e.g., the level of previous education and differences pertaining to clinical experience of the participants, and the impact of the exercise itself.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association of Military Surgeons, 2007
National Category
Clinical Science
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-1431 (URN)000250252000006 ()17985764 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-35348845877 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2008-09-24 Created: 2008-09-24 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Larsson, I. E., Sahlsten, M. J. M., Sjöström, B., Lindencrona, C. S. C. & Plos, K. A. E. (2007). Patient participation in nursing care from a patient perspective: a Grounded Theory study. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 21(3), 313-320
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patient participation in nursing care from a patient perspective: a Grounded Theory study
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2007 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 313-320Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study's rationale: Patients’ active participation in their own care is expected to contribute to increased motivation to improve their own condition, better treatment results and greater satisfaction with received care. Knowledge of patients’ understanding of participation is of great importance for nurses in their efforts to meet patient expectations and for quality of nursing care.

Aim: The aim was to explore the meaning of patient participation in nursing care from a patient point of view.

Methodological design and justification: Six tape-recorded focus group interviews with 26 Swedish informants described opinions on and experiences of patient participation. The informants consisted of patients in somatic inpatient care as well as discharged patients from such a setting. The Grounded Theory method was used and the data were analysed using constant comparative analysis.

Ethical issues and approval: The ethics of scientific work was followed. Each study participant gave informed consent after verbal and written information. The Ethics Committee of Göteborg University approved the study.

Findings: The patients emphasised the importance of collaboration to improve participation. The core category, Insight through consideration, was generated from four inter-related categories: (i) Obliging atmosphere; (ii) Emotional response; (iii) Concordance; and (iv) Rights and their 15 subcategories.

Conclusions: The meaning structures of patient participation in nursing care revealed from a patient point of view, seemed to mainly consist of not only external factors presented by the institutions – by the professionals – but also internal patient factors. The patients’ view of participation should be considered to a greater degree in nursing practice and education, as should also further development of nursing care policy programmes, evaluation and quality assurance criteria. For further development, studies are needed in similar and other settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2007
Keywords
focus group, Grounded Theory, nurse/nursing, patient participation
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-2178 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-6712.2007.00471.x (DOI)000249423800006 ()17727543 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-34548283021 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2008-06-12 Created: 2008-06-12 Last updated: 2019-11-13Bibliographically approved
Sahlsten, M. J. M., Larsson, I. E., Sjöström, B., Lindencrona, C. S. C. & Plos, K. A. E. (2007). Patient participation in nursing care: towards a concept clarification from a nurse perspective. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 16(4), 630-637
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patient participation in nursing care: towards a concept clarification from a nurse perspective
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2007 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 630-637Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim. The aim of this study was to investigate the meanings of the concept of patient participation in nursing care from a nurse perspective.

Background. Participation is essential and increases patients’ motivation and satisfaction with received care. Studies of patient participation in nursing care are not congruent regarding definition, elements and processes. This lack of clarity is amplified by several terms used; patient/client/consumer involvement or collaboration, partnership and influence. Despite the fact that several nursing theories have emphasized the importance of patient participation, an empirically grounded theory has yet to be published.

Methods. Seven focus group interviews were held with nurses providing inpatient physical care at five hospitals in West Sweden. The focus groups consisted of Registered Swedish nurses (n = 31) who described the meaning and implementation of patient participation in nursing care. A Grounded Theory approach has been applied to tape-recorded data. Constant comparative analysis was used and saturation was achieved.

Results. Mutuality in negotiation emerged as the core category for explaining nurses’ perspectives on patient participation in nursing care. It is characterized by four interrelated sub-core categories: interpersonal procedure, therapeutic approach, focus on resources and opportunities for influence. Mutuality in negotiation constitutes the dynamic nurse–patient interaction process.

Conclusions. The study clarifies that patient participation can be explained as an interactional process identified as mutuality in negotiation based on four components.

Relevance to clinical practice. The results are important and can be used in nursing practice and education. Application in a clinical context means nursing care organized to include all the components presented. The results can also be used in quality assurance to improve and evaluate patient participation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2007
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-2180 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2702.2006.01660.x (DOI)000245312200004 ()17402943 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-34047181546 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2008-06-12 Created: 2008-06-12 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Bergh, I. & Sjöström, B. (2007). Quantification of the pain terms hurt, ache and pain among nursing students. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 21(2), 163-168
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quantification of the pain terms hurt, ache and pain among nursing students
2007 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 163-168Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to determine the quantitative meaning nursing students ascribe to the pain terms hurt (ont), ache (värk) and pain (smärta). In total, 549 nursing students filled in a questionnaire including questions about age, gender, and health care work experience. The students were also requested to rate response using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) rating for different statements about hurt, ache and pain. The results show that there were significant differences (p < 0.001) between rated intensity of the statements of hurt, ache and pain. There were, however, large variations in the students’ ratings of the pain terms; hurt ranged from 3 to 97 mm, ache from 7 to 97 mm and pain from 27 to 100 mm. There were no significant differences between male and female students regarding their ratings of hurt and ache when they were used to describe the worst self-experienced pain. Female students rated their experience of pain significantly higher (p < 0.001) on the VAS compared with male students. There was no significant correlation between previous experience of health care work and rated intensity of hurt, ache and pain. In conclusion, this study shows that there exist significant differences between the pain terms hurt, ache and pain according to a rating on a VAS. However, the results also demonstrate that there are large individual variations in how the students quantify the fictitious patient statements of hurt, ache and pain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2007
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-2170 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-6712.2007.00452.x (DOI)000247470100004 ()17559434 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-34249893100 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2008-06-09 Created: 2008-06-09 Last updated: 2019-11-13Bibliographically approved
Engqvist, I., Nilsson, A., Nilsson, K. & Sjöström, B. (2007). Strategies in caring for women with Postpartum Psychosis: an interview study with psychiatric nurses. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 16(7), 1333-1342
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Strategies in caring for women with Postpartum Psychosis: an interview study with psychiatric nurses
2007 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 1333-1342Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim and objective. The aim of this study was to explore strategies in caring for women with postpartum psychosis used by nurses.

Background. The most serious type of psychiatric illness in connection with childbirth is postpartum psychosis. Nearly two in 1000 newly delivered women are stricken by postpartum psychosis. Most of these patients need psychiatric care to recover. While earlier studies point to the need for psychiatric care, knowledge of specific nursing strategies in caring for postpartum psychosis patients remains limited.

Methods. Interviews with 10 experienced psychiatric nurses were carried out, transcribed verbatim and an inductive content analysis was made.

Result. The main strategies for care found in this study were: (i) To create a patient–nurse relationship and (ii) To apply nursing therapeutic interventions. Presence, continuity and nurse-patient partnership contributed to create a relationship and incorporate the rest of the care team. To satisfy the patients’ basic needs and feeling of security was the foundation of the nursing therapeutic interventions. Confirmation and giving hope were also used as nursing therapeutics as well as information to the patient and her relatives about her illness.

Conclusion. The conclusion of the study is that strategies used by nurses are a combination of general and psychiatric nursing approaches but the specificity in caring knowledge for caring patients with postpartum psychosis requires further development.

Relevance to clinical practice. The result of the study indicates that it is important to organize patient care for postpartum psychosis with continuity and consistency and to support the nurse to create a relationship and therapeutic intervention with the patient. The present study shows the importance of further developing specific nursing theories that can be applied when caring for patients with postpartum psychosis. It also shows the need for further pedagogical education for mental health

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2007
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-2172 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2702.2007.01717.x (DOI)000247997900018 ()17584352 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-34250688012 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2008-06-12 Created: 2008-06-12 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
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