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Hedenstierna, PhilipORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0382-1387
Publications (9 of 9) Show all publications
Hedenstierna, P. & Ng, A. H. .. (2011). Dynamic implications of customer order decoupling point positioning. Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, 22(8), 1032-1042
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dynamic implications of customer order decoupling point positioning
2011 (English)In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 22, no 8, p. 1032-1042Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The positioning of the customer order decoupling point (CODP) is an important strategic consideration for supply chains. Recently, research has focused only on the static effects of CODP positioning. The purpose of this paper is to expand the body of knowledge by describing the dynamic consequences that arise from shifting the CODP upstream or downstream.

Design/methodology/approach: A generic assembly-to-order system dynamics simulation model is developed and used to evaluate the dynamic consequences of shifting the CODP.

Findings: Placing the CODP downstream allows for short-term fluctuations in demand to be absorbed by the order book, leading to a stable production rate and inventory response. This benefit must, however, be weighed against any additional safety stock a CODP placed far downstream may require.

Research limitations/implications: The paper demonstrates the importance of considering the dynamic aspects of CODP positioning. Further research should investigate the phenomenon for different demand scenarios and supply chain configurations.

Practical implications: Downstream shifting of the CODP has been identified as a powerful way to reduce variability in assembly-to-order systems.

Originality/value: This paper introduces the dynamic consequences of CODP location, providing a new perspective that should be considered when positioning the CODP.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2011
Keywords
Supply chain management, Assembly, Order systems, System dynamics, Customer order decoupling point, Assembly to order
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-5833 (URN)10.1108/174110381111177476 (DOI)2-s2.0-80455178815 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-05-03 Created: 2012-05-03 Last updated: 2018-05-08Bibliographically approved
Hedenstierna, P., Hilletofth, P. & Hilmola, O.-P. (2011). Integrative purchasing and inventory control at sawnwood retailer - case study. International Journal of procurement management, 4(2), 139-155
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrative purchasing and inventory control at sawnwood retailer - case study
2011 (English)In: International Journal of procurement management, ISSN 1753-8432, E-ISSN 1753-8440, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 139-155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purchasing order methods and inventory control are vital elements in fulfilling customer orders and building internal performance; this is particularly the case in retailing operations. In this manuscript, we develop different scenarios for various order methods for a wood retailer, where the performance of the different methods is evaluated through simulation, whereupon the fit between environments and methods is compared. Our results indicate that only simple environments follow analytical cost and service level calculations, while increasing complexity increases the synchronisation need between forecasts and reordering methods. In our research we also compare different ordering methods, and find that while the reorder point method is the most robust solution from the retailer’s perspective, it could lead to distortion within entire wood supply chain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
InderScience Publishers, 2011
Keywords
purchasing order methods, inventory control, simulation, wood retailing, case study
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-4874 (URN)10.1504/IJPM.2011.038896 (DOI)2-s2.0-84878776432 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-05-04 Created: 2011-05-04 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Aslam, T., Hedenstierna, P., Ng, A. H. C. & Wang, L. (2011). Multi-objective Optimisation in Manufacturing Supply Chain Systems Design: A Comprehensive Survey and New Directions. In: Lihui Wang, Amos H. C. Ng, Kalyanmoy Deb (Ed.), Multi-objective Evolutionary Optimisation for Product Design and Manufacturing: (pp. 35-70). Springer London
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multi-objective Optimisation in Manufacturing Supply Chain Systems Design: A Comprehensive Survey and New Directions
2011 (English)In: Multi-objective Evolutionary Optimisation for Product Design and Manufacturing / [ed] Lihui Wang, Amos H. C. Ng, Kalyanmoy Deb, Springer London, 2011, p. 35-70Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Research regarding supply chain optimisation has been performed for a long time. However, it is only in the last decade that the research community has started to investigate multi-objective optimisation for supply chains. Supply chains are in general complex networks composed of autonomous entities whereby multiple performance measures in different levels, which in most cases are in conflict with each other, have to be taken into account. In this chapter, we present a comprehensive literature review of existing multi-objective optimisation applications, both analytical-based and simulation-based, in supply chain management publications. Later on in the chapter, we identify the needs of an integration of multi-objective optimisation and system dynamics models, and present a case study on how such kind of integration can be applied for the investigation of bullwhip effects in a supply chain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer London, 2011
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-5836 (URN)10.1007/978-0-85729-652-8_2 (DOI)978-0-85729-617-7 (ISBN)978-0-85729-652-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2012-05-03 Created: 2012-05-03 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Dudas, C., Hedenstierna, P. & Ng, A. H. C. (2011). Simulation-based innovization for manufacturing systems analysis using data mining and visual analytics. In: Proceedings of the 4th Swedish Production Symposium: . Paper presented at The 4th Swedish Production Symposium 3-5 May 2011, Lund (pp. 374-382).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Simulation-based innovization for manufacturing systems analysis using data mining and visual analytics
2011 (English)In: Proceedings of the 4th Swedish Production Symposium, 2011, p. 374-382Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-7323 (URN)
Conference
The 4th Swedish Production Symposium 3-5 May 2011, Lund
Available from: 2013-02-26 Created: 2013-02-26 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Hedenstierna, P. (2010). Applying Multi-Objective Optimisation to Dynamic Supply Chain Models. Conradi Research Review, 6(2), 19-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Applying Multi-Objective Optimisation to Dynamic Supply Chain Models
2010 (English)In: Conradi Research Review, ISSN 1459-0980, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 19-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Supply chains are complex industrial systems with several actors that strive towards different purposes. These systems are particularly sensitive to dynamic complexity and are popularly approached using system dynamics simulation. A common problem with system dynamics simulation is the inability to see directly how well a model with several objectives performs. This article suggests multi-objective optimisation as a means of analyzing dynamic supply chain models to (1) find Pareto-optimal parameter sets and (2) allow for comparison of different models by comparing Pareto fronts. Apart from discussing the application of multiobjective optimisation to dynamic supply chain problems, a supply chain model is optimized to give some insight about the benefits of using multi-objective optimisation for supply chain problems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Vaasa University of Applied Science, 2010
Keywords
System dynamics, supply chain management, multi-objective optimisation, APIOBPCS
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-5656 (URN)
Available from: 2012-03-27 Created: 2012-03-27 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Hedenstierna, P. & Ng, A. H. C. (2010). On the placement of the customer order decoupling point. In: Proceedings of 2010 8th International Conference on Supply Chain Management and Information Systems: Logistics Systems and Engineering. Paper presented at 2010 8th International Conference on Supply Chain Management and Information Systems: Logistics Systems and Engineering, SCMIS 2010; Hong Kong; 6 October 2010 through 8 October 2010 (pp. Article number 5681729). Hong Kong: The Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the placement of the customer order decoupling point
2010 (English)In: Proceedings of 2010 8th International Conference on Supply Chain Management and Information Systems: Logistics Systems and Engineering, Hong Kong: The Hong Kong Polytechnic University , 2010, p. Article number 5681729-Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

It is often suggested that supply chains should start working directly towards customer orders as far upstream as possible, mostly for inventory reduction reasons. However, the customer order decoupling point (CODP) cannot be pushed further upstream than customers are willing to wait. In this paper, we use a system dynamics model to show that the optimal placement of the CODP depends on the demand signal. Our findings indicate that placing the CODP downstream allows for short-term fluctuations in demand to be absorbed by the order book, leading to a stable production rate. This benefit must however be weighed against any additional safety stock a CODP placed far downstream may require.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hong Kong: The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, 2010
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-7325 (URN)2-s2.0-79551509329 (Scopus ID)978-9-6236-7696-0 (ISBN)
Conference
2010 8th International Conference on Supply Chain Management and Information Systems: Logistics Systems and Engineering, SCMIS 2010; Hong Kong; 6 October 2010 through 8 October 2010
Available from: 2013-02-26 Created: 2013-02-26 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Hedenstierna, P., Hilletofth, P. & Hilmola, O.-P. (2009). An Integrative Approach To Inventory Control. In: Gerald Reiner (Ed.), Rapid Modelling for Increasing Competitiveness: Tools and Mindset (pp. 105-118). London: Springer London
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Integrative Approach To Inventory Control
2009 (English)In: Rapid Modelling for Increasing Competitiveness: Tools and Mindset / [ed] Gerald Reiner, London: Springer London, 2009, p. 105-118Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Inventory control systems consist of three types of methods: forecasting, safety stock sizing and order timing and sizing. These are all part of the interpretation of a planning environment to generate replenishment orders, and may consequently affect the performance of a system. It is therefore essential to integrate these aspects into a complete inventory control process, to be able to evaluate different methods for certain environments as well as for predicting the overall performance of a system. In this research a framework of an integrated inventory control process has been developed, covering all relations from planning environment to performance measures. Based on this framework a simulation model has been constructed; the objective is to show how integrated inventory control systems perform in comparison to theoretical predictions as well as to show the benefits of using an integrated inventory control process when evaluating the appropriateness of inventory control solutions. Results indicate that only simple applications (for instance without forecasts or seasonality) correspond to theoretical cost and service level calculations, while more complex models (forecasts and changing demand patterns) show the need for tight synchronization between forecasts and reordering methods. As the framework describes all relations that affect performance, it simplifies the construction of simulation models and makes them accurate. Another benefit of the framework is that it may be used to transfer simulation models to real-world applications, or vice versa, without loss of functionality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Springer London, 2009
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-3312 (URN)10.1007/978-1-84882-748-6_9 (DOI)978-1-84882-747-9 (ISBN)978-1-84882-748-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2009-07-10 Created: 2009-07-10 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Hedenstierna, P., Hilletofth, P. & Hilmola, O.-P. (2009). Design of a Framework for Inventory Control - Evaluation of Forecasting and Inventory Control Systems. In: Farhad Nabhani, Catherine Frost, Sara Zarei, Munir Ahmad, William G. Sullivan (Ed.), Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing 2009 (FAIM 2009): . Paper presented at 19th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing: FAIM 2009, July 6th - July 8th, 2009, Teesside University, Middlesbrough, UK (pp. 573-580). Curran Associates, Inc.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Design of a Framework for Inventory Control - Evaluation of Forecasting and Inventory Control Systems
2009 (English)In: Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing 2009 (FAIM 2009) / [ed] Farhad Nabhani, Catherine Frost, Sara Zarei, Munir Ahmad, William G. Sullivan, Curran Associates, Inc., 2009, p. 573-580Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Managing inventories so that overall costs are kept low, while service levels are maintained is the central issue of inventory control, which only regulates two things: the size and the timing of orders. This is typically executed through a planning method, such as the reorder point system or, less frequently, the periodic order quantity system. These take into account a forecast, supposed to gauge the average future demand, and a predetermined safety stock, buffering against forecast errors and demand uncertainty. Pure demand also influences the system, as transactions affect the inventory level. It is crucial to understand how a complete system of demand, forecasts, safety stock calculations and planning methods work together to measure service level and overall cost of the system. This paper outlines a framework for the unambiguous representation of the relations between methods that interpret environmental parameters to plan orders. A number of simulations based on the framework are run to show, how the integration of the inventory control functions may affect the overall performance of the system. The usefullness of the framework lies in its ability to make a system duplicable (i.e. to transfer an inventory control system to a simulation model, or vice versa). Not only is this property important for creating simulation models that exactly depict the system being analysed, it also enables the study of a complete system for order planning, as opposed to optimising individual methods. Studying an inclusive system allow the same metrics to be used to evaluate changes to any method in the system. Another benefit of this approach is that the system's metrics directly reflect changes in the environment. Simulations based on this framework are precise and substantially easier to evaluate than models not adhering to any standard.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Curran Associates, Inc., 2009
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-3432 (URN)978-0-9562303-3-1 (ISBN)978-1-61567-627-9 (ISBN)
Conference
19th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing: FAIM 2009, July 6th - July 8th, 2009, Teesside University, Middlesbrough, UK
Available from: 2009-10-19 Created: 2009-10-15 Last updated: 2018-04-11Bibliographically approved
Hilletofth, P., Ericsson, D., Hilmola, O.-P. & Hedenstierna, P. (2009). New Product Development in a Manufacturing Company - A Challenge for Supply Chain Management. In: Farhad Nabhani (Ed.), Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing: . Paper presented at Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing : FAIM 2009, July 6th - July 8th, 2009, Teesside University, Middlesbrough, UK (pp. 1169-1177). Teesside University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New Product Development in a Manufacturing Company - A Challenge for Supply Chain Management
2009 (English)In: Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing / [ed] Farhad Nabhani, Teesside University , 2009, p. 1169-1177Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The last decades a new type of business environments has evolved characterized by rapid and volatile demand changes, short product life cycles, and high levels of customized products. The competitiveness of a business in these environments is mostly determined by its responsiveness. This is characterized by the ability to quickly scale up or down the production volume, the presence of an innovative and fast product development, and the quick incorporation of customer requirements into the product development. This paper employs a descriptive single case study approach to illustrate how product development is structured and executed in an international manufacturing company, seeking to realize an innovative, predictable, and efficient product development. The objective is to increase the understanding of how product development and product life-cycles are connected to Supply Chain Management (SCM). Case study findings reveal that the case company after implementing a strategic and structured Product Creation Process (PCP) has improved the efficiency and effectiveness of product development. Findings also reveal that the case company has not yet developed any linkages between product development and SCM. Still, the case company has become aware of this issue due to problems associated with the lack of integration between product development and SCM.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Teesside University, 2009
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-3430 (URN)978-0-9562303-3-1 (ISBN)
Conference
Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing : FAIM 2009, July 6th - July 8th, 2009, Teesside University, Middlesbrough, UK
Available from: 2009-10-15 Created: 2009-10-15 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0382-1387

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