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Enskär, Karin
Publications (6 of 6) Show all publications
Nilsson, S., Björkman, B., Almqvist, A.-L., Almqvist, L., Björk-Willén, P., Donohue, D., . . . Hvit, S. (2015). Children's voices: Differentiating a child perspective from a child's perspective. Developmental Neurorehabilitation, 18(3), 162-168
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children's voices: Differentiating a child perspective from a child's perspective
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2015 (English)In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 162-168Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this paper was to discuss differences between having a child perspective and taking the child's perspective based on the problem being investigated.

METHODS:

Conceptual paper based on narrative review.

RESULTS:

The child's perspective in research concerning children that need additional support are important. The difference between having a child perspective and taking the child's perspective in conjunction with the need to know children's opinions has been discussed in the literature. From an ideological perspective the difference between the two perspectives seems self-evident, but the perspectives might be better seen as different ends on a continuum solely from an adult's view of children to solely the perspective of children themselves. Depending on the research question, the design of the study may benefit from taking either perspective. In this article, we discuss the difference between the perspectives based on the problem being investigated, children's capacity to express opinions, environmental adaptations and the degree of interpretation needed to understand children's opinions.

CONCLUSION:

The examples provided indicate that children's opinions can be regarded in most research, although to different degrees.

Keywords
Child perspective, child’s perspective, methodology
National Category
Social Work Other Health Sciences Nursing
Research subject
Woman, Child and Family (WomFam)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-13573 (URN)10.3109/17518423.2013.801529 (DOI)000354216600004 ()23924164 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84929179113 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-05-22 Created: 2017-05-22 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Enskär, K. (2012). Being an Expert Nurse in Pediatric Oncology Care: Nurses' Descriptions in Narratives. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, 29(3), 151-160
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being an Expert Nurse in Pediatric Oncology Care: Nurses' Descriptions in Narratives
2012 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1043-4542, E-ISSN 1532-8457, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 151-160Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pediatric oncology has become a highly specialized area, and the transition from novice nurse to expert can be complicated. The aim of this study was to describe the perceptions of nurses in pediatric oncology regarding the role of an expert nurse in pediatric oncology. Nurses (n = 66) working in pediatric oncology participated by writing their narratives. The data were analyzed by means of content analysis, and 3 categories were found: an expert has confidence in his or her knowledge, an expert provides high-quality care, and an expert is given possibilities for professional growth. It can be concluded that when nurses are given possibilities for continuous education and reflection, and have a feeling of satisfaction at being able to fulfill a child and his or her family's needs, this enhances their possibility to become experts and maintain expert competence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2012
Keywords
expert nurse, pediatric oncology, knowledge, quality care, professional growth
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-6193 (URN)10.1177/1043454212446344 (DOI)000304719500004 ()22647727 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84861802323 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-08-08 Created: 2012-08-08 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Björkman, B., Almqvist, L., Sigstedt, B. & Enskär, K. (2012). Children's experience of going through an acute radiographic examination. Radiography, 18(2), 84-89
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children's experience of going through an acute radiographic examination
2012 (English)In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 84-89Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Children’s experience of radiographic examinations remains largely unexplored, although most radiographers examine children on a daily basis. In order to provide the high quality care that meets the needs of patients it was considered important to undertake research focused upon the patients’ experience of radiographic practice.

The aim of the study was to investigate children’s experiences undergoing a radiographic examination for a suspected fracture.

Inclusion criteria were Swedish-speaking children between 3 and 15 years of age who were submitted for a radiographic examination with an acute condition of the upper or lower extremity. Patients were informed of the study and together with the escorting parent or relative asked for consent to participate.

During the examination the child was videotaped and immediately after, the child was interviewed in a nearby facility. The interview contained open-ended questions and was conducted while watching the videotape together with the child and their parent or relative and the researcher.

Qualitative content analysis was used in analyzing the collected data. The analysis resulted in two categories - “feeling uncomfortable” and “feeling confident”. The subcategories contained in these categories were “pain in relation to injury and examination”, “the waiting time is strenuous”, “worries for the future and consequences of the injury”, “confidence in parental presence”, “confidence in radiographic staff and examination procedure”, and finally “recognition entails familiarity”.

The results revealed that for the younger children, the experience of undergoing an acute radiographic examination was associated with pain and anxiety, but for the older children, the anxiety was more connected to whether the injury had caused a fracture and any anticipated future consequences or complications.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2012
Keywords
Children, experience, radiographic examination, content analysis
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-5883 (URN)10.1016/j.radi.2011.10.003 (DOI)2-s2.0-84859215674 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-05-21 Created: 2012-05-21 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Golsäter, M., Lingfors, H., Sidenvall, B. & Enskär, K. (2012). Health dialogues between pupils and school nurses: A description of the verbal interaction. Patient Education and Counseling, 89(2), 260-266
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health dialogues between pupils and school nurses: A description of the verbal interaction
2012 (English)In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 89, no 2, p. 260-266Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore and describe the content of and the verbal interaction in health dialogues between pupils and school nurses. Methods: Twenty-four health dialogues were recorded using a video camera and the conversations were analysed using the paediatric version of the Roter Interaction analysis system. Results: The results showed that the age appropriate topics suggested by national recommendations were brought up in most of the health dialogues. The nurses were the ones who talked most, in terms of utterances. The pupils most frequently gave information about their lifestyle and agreed with the nurses' statements. The nurses summarised and checked that they had understood the pupils, asked closed-ended questions about lifestyle and gave information about lifestyle. Strategies aimed to make the pupil more active and participatory in the dialogues were the most widely used verbal interaction approaches by the nurses. Conclusion: The nurses' use of verbal interaction approaches to promote pupils' activity and participation, trying to build a partnership in the dialogue, could indicate an attempt to build patient-centred health dialogues. Practice implications: The nurses' great use of questions and being the ones leading the dialogues in terms of utterances point at the necessity for a nurses to have an openness to the pupils own narratives and an attentiveness to what he or she wants to talk about. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2012
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-7514 (URN)10.1016/j.pec.2012.07.012 (DOI)000311766700007 ()22878025 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84868200516 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-03-28 Created: 2013-03-21 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Pergert, P., Ekblad, S., Björk, O., Enskär, K. & Andrews, T. (2012). Protecting Family Interests: An Interview Study with Foreign-Born Parents Struggling On in Childhood Cancer Care. International Journal of Pediatrics, Article ID 681301
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Protecting Family Interests: An Interview Study with Foreign-Born Parents Struggling On in Childhood Cancer Care
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2012 (English)In: International Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 1687-9740, E-ISSN 1687-9759, p. Article ID 681301-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sweden’s population is gradually changing to become more multiethnic and diverse and that applies also for recipients of health care, including childhood cancer care. A holistic view on the sick child in the context of its family has always been a cornerstone in childhood cancer care in Sweden. The purpose of this study was to gain knowledge about the experiences and main concern of foreign-born parents in the context of paediatric cancer care. Interviews were performed with eleven foreign-born parents and data were analysed using a classic grounded theory approach. Foreign-born parents often feel in a position of powerless dependence, but family interests are protected in their approaches to interaction with healthcare staff, through cooperation, contesting, and reluctant resigning. Healthcare staff need to listen to foreign-born parents and deal with their concerns seriously to prevent powerless-dependence and work for trustful cooperation in the common fight against childhood cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2012
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-5878 (URN)10.1155/2012/681301 (DOI)22518180 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-05-15 Created: 2012-05-15 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Enskär, K., Ankarcrona, E., Jörgensen, A. & Huus, K. (2012). Undocumented refugee children in Swedish healthcare: Nurses' knowledge concerning regulations and their attitudes about the care. Vård i Norden, 32(1), 75-78
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Undocumented refugee children in Swedish healthcare: Nurses' knowledge concerning regulations and their attitudes about the care
2012 (English)In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 75-78Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate nurses’ attitudes about care for undocumented refugee children and also to investigate the knowledge among nurses concerning the regulations for this care. The study is quantitative and based on a questionnaire sent to all nurses working in pediatric healthcare and medical care in a medium-sized county in Sweden. The overall response was 91 questionnaires (55.9%). Most of the respondents felt insecure or lacked knowledge of what regulations are valid when undocumented refugee children seek medical care or healthcare. Almost all nurses had a positive attitude toward caring for these children, but they feel they lack knowledge about the regulations regarding their care. To optimize the care situation for these children the regulations should be reviewed and altered to allow the nurse, legally and securely, to care for them.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sykepleiernes Samarbeid i Norden, 2012
Keywords
Nurses' attitudes, nurses' knowledge, undocumented refugees, children
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-5884 (URN)10.1177/010740831203200110 (DOI)
Available from: 2012-05-21 Created: 2012-05-21 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
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