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Hilletofth, P. & Lättilä, L. (2011). Agent based decision support in the supply chain context. In: Proceedings of the 3rd Rapid Modeling Conference: . Paper presented at 3rd Rapid Modeling Conference (RMC 2011), Leuven, Belgium, 12-14 September, 2011. Leuven, Belgium
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Agent based decision support in the supply chain context
2011 (English)In: Proceedings of the 3rd Rapid Modeling Conference, Leuven, Belgium, 2011Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Leuven, Belgium: , 2011
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-8462 (URN)
Conference
3rd Rapid Modeling Conference (RMC 2011), Leuven, Belgium, 12-14 September, 2011
Available from: 2013-09-03 Created: 2013-09-02 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Hilletofth, P. & Eriksson, D. (2011). Coordinating new product development with supply chain management. Industrial management + data systems, 111(2), 264-281
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coordinating new product development with supply chain management
2011 (English)In: Industrial management + data systems, ISSN 0263-5577, E-ISSN 1758-5783, Vol. 111, no 2, p. 264-281Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to form an understanding of how new product development (NPD) relates to supply chain management (SCM), why the two fields should be coordinated, and how this may be done.

Design/methodology/approach – This research uses a literature review and case study research. The case study considers a Swedish company that operates on a global basis in the furniture industry. Empirical data have been collected mainly from in-depth interviews with key persons representing senior and middle management in the case company.

Findings – This paper stresses the need to produce innovative, value-adding products, as well as the necessity to quickly deliver them to the market. Companies that face mature business environments may encounter problems due to a high emphasis on either the value-creation processes, or on the value delivery processes. Therefore, NPD activities need to be coordinated with SCM activities on a strategic level, lest competitiveness will be lost.

Research limitations/implications – The research is limited to one case company; replication studies would enhance understanding of the studied phenomenon. There is a wide need for research exploring how various parts of demand and supply chains should be managed in order to fully utilize the advantages of the consumer-oriented enterprise.

Practical implications – This paper provides insights for researchers and practitioners on how to coordinate and balance NPD (demand side) with SCM (supply side) activities. It highlights that companies should organize themselves around understanding how consumer value is created and how these processes may be coordinated to provide that value. The two processes must be given equal attention and importance to avoid sub-optimization.

Originality/value – The need for coordinating NPD and SCM activities has been emphasized in the literature but still remains relatively unexplored. This paper contributes by investigating this issue further.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2011
Keywords
Product development, Supply chain management, Furniture industry, Sweden
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-4867 (URN)10.1108/02635571111115173 (DOI)000289587800014 ()2-s2.0-79952384287 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-05-03 Created: 2011-05-03 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Hilletofth, P. (2011). Demand-supply chain management: industrial survival recipe for new decade. Industrial management + data systems, 111(2), 184-211
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Demand-supply chain management: industrial survival recipe for new decade
2011 (English)In: Industrial management + data systems, ISSN 0263-5577, E-ISSN 1758-5783, Vol. 111, no 2, p. 184-211Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to enhance the current understanding and knowledge of the demand-supply chain management (DSCM) concept by determining its elements, benefits, and requirements, and by illustrating its occurrence in practice.

Design/methodology/approach – This research has utilized a literature and case study research strategy. The case study has involved an international manufacturing company from the appliance industry. Empirical data have been collected mainly from in-depth interviews with key persons representing senior and middle management in the case organization.

Findings – This research has established that the main elements of DSCM include market orientation, coordination of the demand and supply processes, viewing the demand and supply processes as being equally important, as well as value creation, differentiation, innovativeness, responsiveness, and cost efficiency in the demand and supply processes. It has also been revealed that the main benefits of DSCM include enhanced competitiveness, enhanced demand chain performance, and enhanced supply chain performance, while the main requirements of DSCM include organizational competences, company-established principles, demand-supply chain collaboration, and information technology support.

Research limitations/implications – This research is explorative in nature, and more empirical data, from similar and other research settings, are needed to further validate the findings. Another limitation of the research is that it is limited to one Swedish company; however, the involved case company has a large international presence and is among the top three in its industry, which provides some ground for the generalization. A final limitation of the research is that the involved company only represents one industry.

Practical implications – This paper provides insights useful to researchers and practitioners on how to develop a demand-supply oriented business. It highlights that firms should organize themselves around understanding how customer value is created and delivered and how these processes and management directions can be coordinated. The demand and supply processes have to be considered as equally important and the firm needs to be managed by the demand side and supply side of the company jointly in a coordinated manner.

Originality/value – The need to coordinate the demand and supply processes has been emphasized in both the demand and supply chain literature but still remained relatively unexplored; thus, this paper contributes by investigating this matter further.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2011
Keywords
Demand management, Supply chain management, Sweden, Manufacturing industries
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-4868 (URN)10.1108/02635571111115137 (DOI)000289587800010 ()2-s2.0-79952380201 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-05-03 Created: 2011-05-03 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Hedenstierna, P., Hilletofth, P. & Hilmola, O.-P. (2011). Integrative purchasing and inventory control at sawnwood retailer - case study. International Journal of procurement management, 4(2), 139-155
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrative purchasing and inventory control at sawnwood retailer - case study
2011 (English)In: International Journal of procurement management, ISSN 1753-8432, E-ISSN 1753-8440, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 139-155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purchasing order methods and inventory control are vital elements in fulfilling customer orders and building internal performance; this is particularly the case in retailing operations. In this manuscript, we develop different scenarios for various order methods for a wood retailer, where the performance of the different methods is evaluated through simulation, whereupon the fit between environments and methods is compared. Our results indicate that only simple environments follow analytical cost and service level calculations, while increasing complexity increases the synchronisation need between forecasts and reordering methods. In our research we also compare different ordering methods, and find that while the reorder point method is the most robust solution from the retailer’s perspective, it could lead to distortion within entire wood supply chain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
InderScience Publishers, 2011
Keywords
purchasing order methods, inventory control, simulation, wood retailing, case study
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-4874 (URN)10.1504/IJPM.2011.038896 (DOI)2-s2.0-84878776432 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-05-04 Created: 2011-05-04 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Claesson, F. & Hilletofth, P. (2011). In-transit distribution as a strategy in a global distribution system. International Journal of Shipping and Transport Logistics, 3(2), 198-209
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In-transit distribution as a strategy in a global distribution system
2011 (English)In: International Journal of Shipping and Transport Logistics, ISSN 1756-6517, E-ISSN 1756-6525, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 198-209Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Distribution has become a key factor in today’s logistics system due to companies’ desires to achieve considerable economies of scale in production, achieved by focused factories, as well as customers’ demands for shorter lead-times and customer adapted products. The purpose of this research is to investigate if the in-transit distribution strategy may offer companies a competitive advantage and may be used as a complement to the centralised distribution strategy and/or the decentralised distribution strategy. This study shows that the in-transit distribution strategy can give major competitive advantages by offering rather short lead-times for customers without having to store products locally in warehouses. This, in turn, gives lower warehousing costs, lower tied-up capital, a less interrupted manufacturing, and steady and continuous production volumes. In order to be successful with this strategy, it takes good planning, working closely with customers, good market knowledge, and an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system that is able to support the strategy sufficiently. Among these factors, low variation in demand as well as manufacturing output is required, and furthermore distribution lead time needs to be predictable.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
InderScience Publishers, 2011
Keywords
global distribution, in-transit, Sweden, China, UK, chemical industry
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-4875 (URN)10.1504/IJSTL.2011.039379 (DOI)000289034500006 ()2-s2.0-79953697127 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-05-04 Created: 2011-05-04 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Hilletofth, P., Hilmola, O.-P. & Claesson, F. (2011). In-transit distribution strategy: solution for European factory competitiveness?. Industrial management + data systems, 111(1-2), 20-40
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In-transit distribution strategy: solution for European factory competitiveness?
2011 (English)In: Industrial management + data systems, ISSN 0263-5577, E-ISSN 1758-5783, Vol. 111, no 1-2, p. 20-40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose – Research work describes in-transit distribution strategy by determining and analyzing key principles of it as well as by illustrating its application in practice. Emphasis on in-transit distribution strategy is to turn transportation pipeline as a mobile inventory holding place, and actively dispatching goods to a destination, where there is a predicted demand before any customer orders are actually received. The use of this strategy is supported by current trade flows: emerging market trade has increased considerably, but simultaneously Swedish export prices, for example, have significantly decreased. The paper aims to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach – In-transit strategy is examined through a multiple case study from industrial companies having main factory operations in Sweden as well as using a system dynamics simulation model, and Monte Carlo analysis. These are supported by the second hand data of trade flows between Sweden, and India and China.

Findings – In order to be successful with in-transit strategy, the case studies show that excellent planning, working closely with customers, first-class market knowledge, and an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system that is able to support the process sufficiently are required. Other highlighted requirements of this strategy are low variation in demand, and predictable distribution lead-time. Simulation study of one hypothetical product group verified case study findings, but the authors find it interesting that manufacturing output variance especially is very sensitive regarding to the overall results. If variation increases, then in-transit strategy is not able to deliver for customers with the necessary accuracy. Also increasing average customer demand, and longer transportation delays lead to undesired outcomes (e.g. too much inventory or out of stock situations).

Research limitations/implications – The case study and second hand analysis is limited to one country, and further evidence is needed from other European, and possibly North American companies, to verify these findings.

Originality/value – There has been a rather limited amount of research works completed from the use of in-transit strategy, even if increased trade activity and lower price of exported items is that of the old west in their exports to emerging markets, and continues to be so in the future (was even strong to China during credit crunch year 2009). Our research is seminal in terms of a developed system dynamics simulation model.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2011
Keywords
Distribution, Manufacturing systems, International marketing, Sweden, Case studies
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-4869 (URN)10.1108/02635571111099712 (DOI)000289587800002 ()2-s2.0-79951470806 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-05-03 Created: 2011-05-03 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Claesson, F., Hilletofth, P. & Hilmola, O.-P. (2011). Supply Chain Planning in Automotive Sector: Swedish Case Study. Conradi Research Review, 6(2), 33-54
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Supply Chain Planning in Automotive Sector: Swedish Case Study
2011 (English)In: Conradi Research Review, ISSN 1459-0980, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 33-54Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This research aims to enhance the current level of knowledge from supply chain planning (SCP) by analyzing the importance of collaboration, information exchange and a supporting information system in its successful execution. These are examined through a case study from international manufacturing company, which operates in automotive industry with its global manufacturing network. Research reveals that collaboration is a complex and important issue of SCP, and occurs simultaneously in vertical and horizontal dimensions. It is important to select strategic partners and to develop a structured work processes and routines. The main objective of collaboration is to determine common goals and objectives and to facilitate the exchange of information; these together drive the performance of a supply chain higher. A sufficient information system supporting the SCP is vital to facilitate collaboration, and information exchange between the different supply chain participants. However, currently in the case company quite many phases of SCP are completed without appropriate and integrated information systems and the process itself contains several manual phases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Vaasa University of Applied Sciences, 2011
Keywords
Supply chain planning, manufacturing industry, case study, Sweden
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-4870 (URN)
Available from: 2011-05-03 Created: 2011-05-03 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, D. & Hilletofth, P. (2011). The importance of the retailer for an OEM developing innovative products. Conradi Research Review, 6(2), 63-81
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The importance of the retailer for an OEM developing innovative products
2011 (English)In: Conradi Research Review, ISSN 1459-0980, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 63-81Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The supply chain strategy research has generated many frameworks for matching the supply chain with the nature of demand, market, consumers, or products. Recently many companies have implemented innovative new product development processes in order to increase revenue. However, research on the importance of the retailers for an original equipment manufacturer (OEM) adopting a leagile supply chain strategy for innovative products, is scarce. Using the case study method, this research investigates the need of collaboration between an OEM and its retailers. This research aims to richen the knowledge about demand supply chain management (DSCM), and the coordination of demand and supply processes between companies in the demand-supply chain. This research shows that there are several measures that may be used to monitor performance, and that collaboration is important for the case company.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Vaasa University of Applied Sciences, 2011
Keywords
Wholesaler, retail, collaboration, furniture, demand-supply chain, postponement, leagile, innovative, new product development
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-4871 (URN)
Available from: 2011-05-03 Created: 2011-05-03 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Hilletofth, P. & Jäger, K. (2011). The role of logistics service providers in the implementation of a differentiated supply chain. International Journal of Shipping and Transport Logistics, 3(2), 151-167
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of logistics service providers in the implementation of a differentiated supply chain
2011 (English)In: International Journal of Shipping and Transport Logistics, ISSN 1756-6517, E-ISSN 1756-6525, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 151-167Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This research investigates the role of logistics service providers in the implementation of a differentiated supply chain. The issue is examined through a multiple case study combined with a literature review. The research shows that logistics service providers can support companies with the implementation of a differentiated supply chain in sourcing and distribution parts by providing services that the company is incapable to provide, by providing certain services more efficiently or by providing complementing services. In some situations, the logistics service provider is even responsible for the entire implementation and should continuously develop the logistics process and customised service according to the company’s market situation. Eurasian transportation flows are nowadays an important part of most supply chains and needs to be considered in this differentiation work. Logistics service providers operating in these flows can support the differentiation by providing more customised and differentiated transportation services and there is a demand for more transportation alternatives in these flows.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
InderScience Publishers, 2011
Keywords
differentiated supply chain; implementation; logistics service providers
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-4873 (URN)10.1504/IJSTL.2011.039376 (DOI)000289034500003 ()2-s2.0-79953722255 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-05-03 Created: 2011-05-03 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Hilletofth, P., Ujvari, S., Lättilä, L. & Hilmola, O.-P. (2010). Agent-based decision support for maintenance service provider. International Journal of Services Sciences, 3(2/3), 194-215
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Agent-based decision support for maintenance service provider
2010 (English)In: International Journal of Services Sciences, ISSN 1753-1446, Vol. 3, no 2/3, p. 194-215Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Operations performed by a maintenance service provider (MSP) can include the entire maintenance function or select activities; these need to be well-balanced in terms of utilisation rate of own resources, maintenance cost incurred and the uptime of the customers’ production systems. MSPs face challenges due to the task of planning several non-associated plants and with a frequent lack of reliable information. In this research work, an agent-based decision support system of service-related maintenance has been developed. Research shows that this approach can improve the understanding of the problem domain and also generate a basis for decision-making and structural changes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Inderscience Enterprises Ltd., 2010
Keywords
service operations, agent-based modelling and simulation, ABMS, decision support
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-4049 (URN)10.1504/IJSSCI.2010.032223 (DOI)
Available from: 2010-06-10 Created: 2010-06-10 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8305-4412

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