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Ekström, L., Adolfsson, A., Ericson, H., Poutakidis, G., Charonis, G. & Larsson, P.-G. (2013). Vaginal flora and urinary and vaginal group B streptococci in early pregnancy. Gynecology, 1, Article ID 6.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vaginal flora and urinary and vaginal group B streptococci in early pregnancy
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2013 (English)In: Gynecology, ISSN 2052-6210, Vol. 1, article id 6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a risk factor for premature birth and group B streptococci (GBS) colonizing the vagina are etiological agents of neonatal infections. Significant growth of GBS in the vagina has been assumed to be detectable through urinary culture. The aim was to investigate the correlation between BV and the presence of GBS in qualitative vaginal or quantitative urinary culture, since this could predict a higher risk for perinatal morbidity. Design and setting: A consecutive prospective study of women in early pregnancy included 3101 women between 2007 and 2010, in a region of south-western Sweden. Methods: Vaginal and urine samples were obtained from women in early pregnancy at maternity health care clinics. BV was diagnosed according to the Ison/Hay classification. GBS in urine were detected in amounts as low as 100 CFU/ml. Vaginal culturing for GBS was obtained from a selected group of 481 women. Results: There was no difference in the prevalence of GBS in the urine among women with BV compared with women with lactobacilli flora (OR 0.7; 95% CI 0.4-1.1). Vaginal presence of GBS was found among 17.3% of women with BV and among 23.5% of women with lactobacilli flora (OR 0.7; 95% CI 0.3-1.4). Among the 105 women who had vaginal GBS, the urine culture of GBS was positive in only 21.9% of cases. Conclusions: Even though women with BV. have much higher concentration of bacteria in the vagina, they do not necessarily have more GBS in the vagina or urine. The modest correlation between positive vaginal culture and positive urine culture of GBS question the value of urinary culture for detection of vaginal GBS.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Herbert Publications, 2013
Keywords
Bacterial vaginosis, group B streptococci, pregnancy, vagina
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Natural sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-8591 (URN)10.7243/2052-6210-1-6 (DOI)
Available from: 2013-10-29 Created: 2013-10-29 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Dahlén, I., Westin, L. & Adolfsson, A. (2012). Experience of being a low priority patient during waiting time at an emergency department. Psychology Research and Behavior Management, 5, 1-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experience of being a low priority patient during waiting time at an emergency department
2012 (English)In: Psychology Research and Behavior Management, ISSN 1179-1578, E-ISSN 1179-1578, Vol. 5, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Work in the emergency department is characterized by fast and efficient medical efforts to save lives, but can also involve a long waiting time for patients. Patients are given a priority rating upon their arrival in the clinic based on the seriousness of their problem, and nursing care for lower priority patients is given a lower prioritization. Regardless of their medical prioritization, all patients have a right to expect good nursing care while they are waiting. The purpose of this study was to illustrate the experience of the low prioritized patient during their waiting time in the emergency department. Methods: A phenomenological hermeneutic research method was used to analyze an interview transcript. Data collection consisted of narrative interviews. The interviewees were 14 patients who had waited more than three hours for surgical, orthopedic, or other medical care.Results: The findings resulted in four different themes, ie, being dependent on care, being exposed, being vulnerable, and being secure. Lower priority patients are not paid as much attention by nursing staff. Patients reported feeling powerless, insulted, and humiliated when their care was delayed without their understanding what was happening to them. Not understanding results in exposure that violates self-esteem. Conclusion: The goal of the health care provider must be to minimize and prevent suffering, prevent feelings of vulnerability, and to create conditions for optimal patient well being.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dove Press, 2012
Keywords
emergency department, patients, waiting times, nursing staff
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-5777 (URN)10.2147/PRBM.S27790 (DOI)22334799 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84857084041 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-04-25 Created: 2012-04-25 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Andersson, I.-M., Nilsson, S. & Adolfsson, A. (2012). How women who have experienced one or more miscarriages manage their feelings and emotions when they become pregnant again: a qualitative interview study. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 26(2), 262-270
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How women who have experienced one or more miscarriages manage their feelings and emotions when they become pregnant again: a qualitative interview study
2012 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 262-270Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate how women who have experienced one or more miscarriages manage their feelings when they become pregnant again.

Method:  Individual qualitative interviews were conducted with 16 women who were pregnant again after experiencing one or more miscarriages. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis with an inductive approach.

Results: The analysis of the material ended up in five categories: distancing herself from her pregnancy, focusing on her pregnancy symptoms, searching for confirming information, asking for ultrasound examination and asking for professional and social support. Because of their past experience with miscarriage, it could be painful to have another pregnancy terminate in disappointment. Therefore, the women manage their feelings by distancing themselves from their pregnancies. Simultaneously, they are managing their emotions by seeking affirmation that their current pregnancy is normal.

Conclusion: Generally speaking, women manage their emotions by themselves. They feel isolated with their worries and concerns, and they are in need of the support provided from their intimate circle of friends and family as well as from the staff of the maternity health care ward. Unfortunately, the women do not feel that they get the support they need from the staff, instead they have to rely on their friends, family and partners to help them manage their emotions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2012
Keywords
manage, pregnancy, qualitative content analysis, miscarriage, support, ultrasound
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-5780 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-6712.2011.00927.x (DOI)000304000000008 ()2-s2.0-84860992528 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-04-26 Created: 2012-04-26 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Rosebrink, M., Zekaj, M. & Adolfsson, A. (2012). Kvinnors upplevelser av tidig graviditet, efter att ha upplevt ett eller flera missfall tidigare i livet. Vård i Norden, 32(1), 4-8
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kvinnors upplevelser av tidig graviditet, efter att ha upplevt ett eller flera missfall tidigare i livet
2012 (Swedish)In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 4-8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To describe women’s experiences of early pregnancy after their experience of earlier miscarriage(s).

Method: This study used a qualitative method with a phenomenological perspective. Midwives working in Maternity Healthcare Center were intermediaries in the data collection. The analysis material consisted of six open interviews with women in early stages of pregnancy that have experienced miscarriage in the past. The data analysis created an essence of the women´s experiences.

Results: All of the interviewees are happy to be pregnant. For some of the women the happiness is mixed with worry about experiencing another miscarriage. They are reluctant to experience the grief and loss that had accompanied their previous miscarriages. Those women are able to explain their misgivings to friends and family experience less worry and reluctance. A positive outlook for their pregnancy and to see miscarriage as something natural makes it easier to live with the outcomes.

Conclusion: Women who have had a previous experience of miscarriage have mixed feelings of happiness and worry in early stages of pregnancy. Those women that choose to think positively accept miscarriage as part of nature’s way and feel an inner peace. All of the women realize the importance of finding peace in their pregnancy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sykepleiernes Samarbeid i Norden, 2012
Keywords
Woman, miscarriage, perinatal loss, early pregnancy, experience
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-6468 (URN)
Available from: 2012-10-08 Created: 2012-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Adolfsson, A. & Jansson, M. (2012). Prototype for Internet support of pregnant women and mothers with type I diabetes: focus group testing. Psychology Research and Behavior Management, 5, 97-103
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prototype for Internet support of pregnant women and mothers with type I diabetes: focus group testing
2012 (English)In: Psychology Research and Behavior Management, ISSN 1179-1578, E-ISSN 1179-1578, Vol. 5, p. 97-103Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The aim of this study was to pilot test a prototype website called MODIAB-web designed to support pregnant women and mothers with type 1 diabetes.

Method: A focus group was undertaken and the results were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

Results: Eight subthemes were identified, comprising "blood glucose versus insulin," "application for smart phones," "the time aspect," "interface and technology," "forum," "direct link to the diabetes midwife," "ask the expert," and "lack of contact information." These subthemes were condensed into two main themes. The first theme was "easily understood interface, but in need of a more blood-glucose focused orientation" and the second theme was "forum for interaction with both equals and experts."

Conclusion: The women in this study had positive impressions of several of the MODIAB-web functions, including a forum for pregnant mothers with type 1 diabetes and the possibility of being able to put their blood glucose levels into a diagram which could be sent directly to the diabetes midwife. Access to articles and information via the "fact" tab and the ability to ask questions of experts were also significantly helpful to women in the focus group. Pregnant women and mothers with type 1 diabetes can gain support from such a Web-based self-help system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dovepress, 2012
Keywords
type 1 diabetes, web support, pregnancy, focus group interview
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-6536 (URN)10.2147/PRBM.S32799 (DOI)22915948 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84872178796 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-10-15 Created: 2012-10-15 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Hogström, L., Johansson, M., Jansson, P. O., Berg, M., Francis, J., Sogn, J., . . . Adolfsson, A. (2012). Quality of life after adopting compared with childbirth with or without assisted reproduction. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, 91(9), 1077-1085
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quality of life after adopting compared with childbirth with or without assisted reproduction
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2012 (English)In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 91, no 9, p. 1077-1085Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective. This study compares quality of life among couples who had adopted a child 4–5.5 years previously with couples whose conception was spontaneous, as well as with couples who had successful or unsuccessful in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment. Design. Cross-sectional study. Setting. Tertiary level university hospital. Sample. From the following groups, 979 responses were obtained: adoption; successful IVF; unsuccessful IVF–living with children; unsuccessful IVF–living without children; and childbirth after spontaneous conception (controls). Methods. Quality of life was studied with the Psychological General Well Being (PGWB) and Sense of Coherence (SOC) instruments. Demographic, socio-economic and health data were obtained with additional questionnaires. Multiple variance analysis was applied. Main outcome measures. The PGWB and SOC scores. Results. After adjustment for seven confounders, the adoption group had higher PGWB scores than the unsuccessful IVF–living without children and the controls and higher SOC scores than all other groups. The unsuccessful IVF–living without children had lower PGWB and SOC scores than all other groups. The PGWB and SOC scores among controls did not differ from those with successful IVF or unsuccessful IVF–living with children. Conclusions. Adjusted PGWB and SOC scores revealed a high quality of life in the adoption group. However, the group unsuccessful IVF–living without children had low quality of life scores. Quality of life appears to be independent of the outcome of IVF treatment as long as there are children in the family.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2012
Keywords
Adoption, infertility, in vitro fertilization, well-being, coping, quality of life
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-6464 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-0412.2012.01491.x (DOI)000307567500011 ()22708621 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84865109413 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-10-08 Created: 2012-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Adolfsson, A., Johansson, C. & Nilsson, E. (2012). Swedish Women's Emotional Experience of the First Trimester in a New Pregnancy after One or More Miscarriages: A Qualitative Interview Study. Advances in Sexual Medicine, 2(3), 38-45
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish Women's Emotional Experience of the First Trimester in a New Pregnancy after One or More Miscarriages: A Qualitative Interview Study
2012 (English)In: Advances in Sexual Medicine, ISSN 2164-5191, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 38-45Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate how Swedish women describe their emotional state of being during the eighth week through the eleventh week after they have become pregnant again after suffering a previous miscarriage. Method: A qualitative content analysis with an inductive approach has been used to analyze fourteen interviews that served as the data base for this study. The content analysis resulted in the development of five categories which evolved into one primary theme. Findings: The five categories identified were Worry and preoccupation; Distance; managing their feelings; Mourning what is lost; Guarded happiness and expectations. These categories were compiled into a main theme, “Worry consumes a lot of energy, but on the other side lies happiness”. This theme focused on whether the women could feel any happiness about being pregnant again despite their concerns with the previous miscarriage. Conclusions: The emotional states of the women when they get pregnant again are typically characterized by anxiety, worry and concerns about their current pregnancy. The women have a tendency to distance themselves emotionally from their pregnancy but also strive to find the joy of being pregnant again. During the new pregnancy they find themselves in need of support from their family and friends as well as in need of support from the healthcare system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Scientific Research Publishing, 2012
Keywords
Miscarriage, Pregnancy after Miscarriage, Subsequent Pregnancy, Women's Emotional Experiences, Worry
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-6467 (URN)10.4236/asm.2012.23007 (DOI)
Available from: 2012-10-08 Created: 2012-10-08 Last updated: 2017-11-27
Adolfsson, A., Granevik, K. & Paulson, K. (2012). The Reason Why Women Do Not Participate in the Papsmear Screening and Testing Program in Sweden. Advances in Sexual Medicine, 2(3), 31-37
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Reason Why Women Do Not Participate in the Papsmear Screening and Testing Program in Sweden
2012 (English)In: Advances in Sexual Medicine, ISSN 2164-5191, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 31-37Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cervical cancer is the second most common type of cancer among women worldwide. In Sweden cervical cancer is the fifteenth most common cancer among women and accounts for 1.9 percent of all female cancers. The Swedish Pap smear screening program is enabling early detection of cell changes in order that treatment may be administered to prevent the development of cancerous cells. There are approximately four hundred and fifty cases of cervical cancer detected each year in Sweden and of these cases, approximately seventy five percent occur in women who do not participate in the screening and testing program. The purpose of this study was to illustrate and examine the reasons why women did not participate in the program even though they had received a notice that they had an appointment for a Pap smear test. In the study fourteen women from a district in the west of Sweden were interviewed. In order to analyse the interviews a qualitative content analysis according to Lundman and Graneheim was used. The analysis resulted in the development of three categories which were identified as communication, treatment and subterfuge (reasons or excuses for not participating). The theme of the study was the professional treatment of the women’s conditions. In the interviews the women emphasize the importance of professional treatment that is administered with respectful and sympathetic care throughout the whole healthcare system regardless of where and when the visit was conducted. Efficient organization and clear communication would minimize the inconvenience for the women during their visit.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Scientific Research Publishing, 2012
Keywords
Attitude, Communication, Pap Smear, Screening, Subterfuge, Women's Health
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-6465 (URN)10.4236/asm.2012.23006 (DOI)
Available from: 2012-10-08 Created: 2012-10-08 Last updated: 2017-11-27
Jansson, C. & Adolfsson, A. (2011). Application of "Swanson's Middle Range Caring Theory" in Sweden after miscarriage. International Journal of Clinical Medicine, 2(2), 102-109
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Application of "Swanson's Middle Range Caring Theory" in Sweden after miscarriage
2011 (English)In: International Journal of Clinical Medicine, ISSN 2158-284X, E-ISSN 2158-2882, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 102-109Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of this study was to apply Swanson’s Middle Range Caring Theory to the follow-up visit with a midwife for Swedish women who have suffered early miscarriage or received care for late missed miscarriage in pregnancy week 18-20. Methods: Twenty-five tape recorded interviews with women four weeks after their early miscarriages and thirteen tape recorded semi-structured interviews with midwives and nurses who had the experience of caring for women who have been diagnosed with a missed miscarriage during a routine ultrasound scan. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and interpreted deductively from the text using the theory. Results: Each woman described her personal experience of miscarriage in the relative terms of a human experience. The midwives and nurses described their experiences with women who received care for missed miscarriage. The interviews included information about the treatment provided by the caregivers during the period afterward of the diagnosis. The caregiver attitude was formed from Swanson’s caring categories: “Maintaining belief”, “knowing”, “being with”, “doing for”, “enabling”. Conclusions: Swanson’s Middle Range Caring Theory as applied to the caregiver includes being emotionally present, giving support with respect for the woman’s dignity, being competent, meeting each woman’s own individual needs. Given the proper care after a miscarriage every woman has the power within herself to improve their wellbeing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Scientific Research Publishing, 2011
Keywords
Swanson's Middle Range Caring Theory, Miscarriage, Missed Miscarriage, Qualitative Method
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-5390 (URN)10.4236/ijcm.2011.22021 (DOI)
Available from: 2012-01-13 Created: 2012-01-13 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Adolfsson, A. (2011). Barnmorskans avancerade kliniska omvårdnad vid gynekologisk öppenvårdsmottagning (1ed.). In: Lisbeth Fagerström (Ed.), Avancerad klinisk sjuksköterska: Avancerad klinisk omvårdnad i teori och praxis (pp. 355-376). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Barnmorskans avancerade kliniska omvårdnad vid gynekologisk öppenvårdsmottagning
2011 (Swedish)In: Avancerad klinisk sjuksköterska: Avancerad klinisk omvårdnad i teori och praxis / [ed] Lisbeth Fagerström, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2011, 1, p. 355-376Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2011 Edition: 1
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-5146 (URN)91-44-05947-7 (ISBN)978-91-44-05947-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2011-06-28 Created: 2011-06-28 Last updated: 2017-12-28Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2577-1632

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