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MacGregor, Oskar
Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
MacGregor, O. (2015). Trivial Love. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics, 24(4), 497-500
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trivial Love
2015 (English)In: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics, ISSN 0963-1801, E-ISSN 1469-2147, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 497-500Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2015
Keywords
love, medicalization, pharmaceuticalization
National Category
Ethics
Research subject
Humanities and Social sciences; Consciousness and Cognitive Neuroscience
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-11539 (URN)10.1017/S0963180115000171 (DOI)000361569300014 ()26364785 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84941619813 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-09-23 Created: 2015-09-23 Last updated: 2019-10-07Bibliographically approved
MacGregor, O. (2015). WADA's Whereabouts Requirements and Privacy. In: Verner Møller, Ivan Waddington & John M. Hoberman (Ed.), Routledge Handbook of Drugs and Sport: (pp. 310-321). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>WADA's Whereabouts Requirements and Privacy
2015 (English)In: Routledge Handbook of Drugs and Sport / [ed] Verner Møller, Ivan Waddington & John M. Hoberman, London: Routledge, 2015, p. 310-321Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2015
Series
Routledge International Handbooks
Keywords
WADA, doping, anti-doping, whereabouts, privacy
National Category
Medical Ethics Ethics
Research subject
Humanities and Social sciences; Consciousness and Cognitive Neuroscience
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-11425 (URN)978-0-415-70278-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-08-26 Created: 2015-08-26 Last updated: 2019-10-07Bibliographically approved
MacGregor, O., Griffith, R., Ruggiu, D. & McNamee, M. (2013). Anti-doping, purported rights to privacy and WADA’s whereabouts requirements: A legal analysis. Fair Play, 1(2), 13-38
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anti-doping, purported rights to privacy and WADA’s whereabouts requirements: A legal analysis
2013 (English)In: Fair Play, ISSN 2014-9255, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 13-38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent discussions among lawyers, philosophers, policy researchers and athletes have focused on thepotential threat to privacy posed by the World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA) whereaboutsrequirements. These requirements demand, among other things, that all elite athletes file theirwhereabouts information for the subsequent quarter on a quarterly basis and comprise data for onehour of each day when the athlete will be available and accessible for no advance notice testing at aspecified location of their choosing. Failure to file one’s whereabouts, or the non-availability fortesting at said location on three occasions within any 18-month period constitutes an anti-doping ruleviolation that is equivalent to testing positive to a banned substance, and may lead to a suspension ofthe athlete for a time period of between one and two years. We critically explore the extent to whichWADA’s whereabouts requirements are in tension with existing legislation on privacy, with respect toUK athletes, who are simultaneously protected by UK domestic and EU law. Both UK domestic andEU law are subject to the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) Article 8, whichestablishes a right to “respect for private and family life, home and correspondence”. We criticallydiscuss the centrality of the whereabouts requirements in relation to WADA’s aims, and the adoptionand implementation of its whereabouts rules. We conclude that as WADA’s whereabouts requirementsappear to be in breach of an elite athlete’s rights under European workers’ rights, health & safety anddata protection law they are also, therefore, in conflict with Article 8 of the ECHR and the UK HumanRights Act 1998. We call for specific amendments that cater for the exceptional case of elite sportslabour if the WADA requirements are to be considered legitimate.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Universitat Pompeu Fabra, 2013
Keywords
doping, privacy, data protection, human rights, dopaje, intimidad, protección de datos, derechos humanos
National Category
Law and Society
Research subject
Humanities and Social sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-8598 (URN)
Available from: 2013-10-30 Created: 2013-10-30 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
MacGregor, O. & McNamee, M. (2011). Harm, risk, and doping analogies: A counter-response to Kious. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics, 32(3), 201-7
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Harm, risk, and doping analogies: A counter-response to Kious
2011 (English)In: Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics, ISSN 1386-7415, E-ISSN 1573-0980, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 201-7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Brent Kious has objected to our previous criticism of his views on doping, maintaining that we, by and large, misrepresented his position. In this response, we strengthen our original misgivings, arguing that (1) his views on risk of harm in sport are either uncontroversially true (not inconsistent with the views of many doping opponents) or demonstrably false (attribute to doping opponents an overly simplistic view), (2) his use of analogies (still) indicates an oversimplification of many issues surrounding the question of doping in sports, and (3) his doping analogies are insufficiently precise to support his conclusions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2011
Keywords
Sports ethics, doping, moral methodology, sports, performance enhancement
National Category
Medical Ethics
Research subject
Humanities and Social sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-8908 (URN)10.1007/s11017-011-9178-9 (DOI)21472395 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-02-27 Created: 2014-02-27 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
MacGregor, O. (2010). Performance-enhancing technologies in sports: Ethical, conceptual, and scientific issues [Review]. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy, 4(1), 106-8
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Performance-enhancing technologies in sports: Ethical, conceptual, and scientific issues
2010 (English)In: Sport, Ethics and Philosophy, ISSN 1751-1321, E-ISSN 1751-133X, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 106-8Article, book review (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2010
National Category
Ethics
Research subject
Humanities and Social sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-8909 (URN)10.1080/17511320903580106 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-02-27 Created: 2014-02-27 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
MacGregor, O. & McNamee, M. (2010). Philosophy on steroids: A reply. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics, 31(6), 401-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Philosophy on steroids: A reply
2010 (English)In: Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics, ISSN 1386-7415, E-ISSN 1573-0980, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 401-10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Brent Kious has recently attacked several arguments generally adduced to support anti-doping in sports, which are widely supported by the sports medicine fraternity, international sports federations, and international governments. We show that his attack does not succeed for a variety of reasons. First, it uses an overly inclusive definition of doping at odds with the WADA definition, which has global, if somewhat contentious, currency. Second, it seriously misconstrues the position it attacks, rendering the attack without force against a more balanced construal of an anti-doping position. Third, it makes unwarranted appeals to matters Kious considers morally 'clear', while simultaneously attacking a position many others take to be equally morally 'clear', namely that of anti-doping. Such an inconsistency, attacking and appealing to the moral status quo as befits one's argument, is not acceptable without further qualification. Fourth, his position suffers from a general methodological flaw of over-reliance upon argumentation by analogy. Moreover, it is argued that the analogies, being poorly selected and developed, fail to justify his conclusion that the anti-doping lobby lacks philosophical and moral authority for its stance. These issues are symptomatic of a more fundamental problem: any attempt at providing a blanket solution to the question of whether doping is morally acceptable or not is bound to run up against problems when applied to highly specific contexts. Thus, rather than reaching any particular conclusion for or against doping products or processes in this article, we conclude that an increased context-sensitivity will result in a more evenhanded appraisal of arguments on the matter.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2010
Keywords
Sports ethics, Doping, Moral methodology, Sports, Performance enhancement
National Category
Medical Ethics
Research subject
Humanities and Social sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-8907 (URN)10.1007/s11017-010-9154-9 (DOI)20706791 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-02-27 Created: 2014-02-27 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Valli, K., Lenasdotter, S., MacGregor, O. & Revonsuo, A. (2007). A Test of the Threat Simulation Theory: Replication of Results and Independent Sample. Sleep and Hypnosis: A Journal of Clinical Neuroscience and Psychopathology, 9(1), 30-46
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Test of the Threat Simulation Theory: Replication of Results and Independent Sample
2007 (English)In: Sleep and Hypnosis: A Journal of Clinical Neuroscience and Psychopathology, ISSN 1302-1192, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 30-46Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Threat Simulation Theory (TST) postulates that dreaming evolved as a mental simulation for the rehearsal of the neurocognitive mechanisms essential for threat recognition and avoidance behaviors. In the present study, we tested the predictions of the TST that dreams are specialized in the frequent simulation of realistic and severe threatening events targeted against the dream self, and that the dream self is likely to take appropriate defensive actions against the threat. The subjects were 50 Swedish university students who kept home-based dream diaries for a period of two or four weeks. The dreams were analyzed with a content analysis method specifically designed for identifying and classifying threatening events in dreams, the Dream Threat Scale. Our results show that in the dreams of ordinary young adults threatening events are frequent, severe, realistic and targeted against the self and significant others. Appropriate defensive actions are frequently undertaken when the situation allows active participation. The present study replicates earlier findings but in an independent sample, collected in a different country and language area, and analyzed by judges different from the original study. Our findings thus offer further support for the predictions of the TST

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Yerküre Tanitim ve Yayincilik A.S, 2007
Research subject
Humanities and Social sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-2129 (URN)2-s2.0-34548474879 (Scopus ID)
Note

From the Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Turku, Finland (Dr. Valli); School for Humanities and Informatics University of Skövde, Sweden (Drs. Lenasdotter and MacGregor); and Department of Philosophy University of Helsinki (Dr. Revonsuo)

Available from: 2008-06-04 Created: 2008-06-04 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
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