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Torstensson, Niklas
Publications (9 of 9) Show all publications
Susi, T., Torstensson, N. & Wilhelmsson, U. (2019). "Can you send me a photo?": A Game-Based Approach for Increasing Young Children’s Risk Awareness to Prevent Online Sexual Grooming. In: Akinori Nakamura (Ed.), DiGRA '19 - Proceedings of the 2019 DiGRA International Conference: Game, Play and the Emerging Ludo-Mix. Paper presented at DiGRA 2019, The 12th Digital Games Research Association Conference, Kyoto, Japan, August, 6-10, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Can you send me a photo?": A Game-Based Approach for Increasing Young Children’s Risk Awareness to Prevent Online Sexual Grooming
2019 (English)In: DiGRA '19 - Proceedings of the 2019 DiGRA International Conference: Game, Play and the Emerging Ludo-Mix / [ed] Akinori Nakamura, 2019Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper presents a game-based approach for raising young children's online risk awareness, to decrease the risk of becoming the subject of sexual grooming. Hidden in the Park is an adventure game, including a classic game board and a tablet with Augmented Reality-technology. The game mechanics are based on data from true grooming processes. The game's target group is children aged 8-10 years. This paper describes the game development, from a prototype to an approved release version that will be released as a non-profit product during 2019. We describe the creation of the game mechanics, the iterative development process, and game evaluation. 25 pupils in the target group participated, but the ages 7-12 (n=70) were included to evaluate whether the game would suit the intended target group. Results show that the game is fun and engaging but that it also raise questions concerning online activities.

Keywords
Serious Games, game-based learning, game design, augmented reality, online sexual grooming
National Category
Interaction Technologies Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Media, Technology and Culture (MTEC)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-17774 (URN)
Conference
DiGRA 2019, The 12th Digital Games Research Association Conference, Kyoto, Japan, August, 6-10, 2019
Available from: 2019-10-09 Created: 2019-10-09 Last updated: 2019-10-11Bibliographically approved
Susi, T. & Torstensson, N. (2019). “Who’s Texting?” – Playful Game Experiences for Learning to Cope with Online Risks. In: Xiaowen Fang (Ed.), HCI in Games: First International Conference, HCI-Games 2019, Held as Part of the 21st HCI International Conference, HCII 2019, Orlando, FL, USA, July 26–31, 2019, Proceedings. Paper presented at First International Conference, HCI-Games 2019, Held as Part of the 21st HCI International Conference, HCII 2019, Orlando, FL, USA, July 26–31, 2019 (pp. 427-441). Cham: Springer, 11595
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“Who’s Texting?” – Playful Game Experiences for Learning to Cope with Online Risks
2019 (English)In: HCI in Games: First International Conference, HCI-Games 2019, Held as Part of the 21st HCI International Conference, HCII 2019, Orlando, FL, USA, July 26–31, 2019, Proceedings / [ed] Xiaowen Fang, Cham: Springer, 2019, Vol. 11595, p. 427-441Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper describes the development and evaluation of the innovative computer game Hidden in the Park, for 8–10 year old children. It is a mixed media game that includes classic game elements and Augmented Reality technology. It is a non-profit game designed for a playful game experience. But, it is also a serious game intended to raise young childrens’ risk awareness in online interactions, to decrease the risk of becoming the subject of online sexual grooming. The game is intended to evoke thoughts and reflections related to players’ decisions and their consequences. Furthermore, the game is based on research on true online grooming processes, which provides the basis for some central game mechanics. Game evaluations were carried out with 70 children in school settings. The results show that the participants perceived the game as fun and engaging, but that it also raised questions and reactions, as intended. Hidden in the Park will be released during 2019 and it will be available for free download. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2019
Series
Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 1611-3349, E-ISSN 0302-9743 ; 11595
Keywords
Computer game, Child-computer interaction, Game evaluation, Online risk awareness, Online sexual grooming
National Category
Interaction Technologies
Research subject
Media, Technology and Culture (MTEC)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-17513 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-22602-2_32 (DOI)2-s2.0-85069846561 (Scopus ID)978-3-030-22601-5 (ISBN)978-3-030-22602-2 (ISBN)
Conference
First International Conference, HCI-Games 2019, Held as Part of the 21st HCI International Conference, HCII 2019, Orlando, FL, USA, July 26–31, 2019
Note

Also part of the Information Systems and Applications, incl. Internet/Web, and HCI book sub series (LNISA, volume 11595)

Available from: 2019-08-12 Created: 2019-08-12 Last updated: 2019-08-23Bibliographically approved
Torstensson, N. & Susi, T. (2015). Online sexual grooming and offender tactics -: What can we learn from social media dialogues?. In: Billing, E., Lindblom, J. & Ziemke, T. (Ed.), Proceedings of the 2015 Swecog Conference: . Paper presented at 2015 Swecog Conference, The Swedish Cognitive Science Society (pp. 23-23). Skövde, 3
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Online sexual grooming and offender tactics -: What can we learn from social media dialogues?
2015 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2015 Swecog Conference / [ed] Billing, E., Lindblom, J. & Ziemke, T., Skövde, 2015, Vol. 3, p. 23-23Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

While online social networking sites and other digital media provide a means for positive online experiences, they are also being misused for offences like online sexual grooming. Attempts have been made to analyse and model online grooming in order to understand this kind of predator behaviour (e.g., O’Connell, 2004; Williams et al., 2013). This research, and the resulting models of the grooming process, is however, invariably based on material where adult decoys (e.g., researchers, law enforcement officers, adults trained to entrap offenders) pose as children in the interaction with potential offenders. We argue that such material, i.e., decoy-offender chat logs, does not reflect real grooming processes; Decoys have an underlying agenda to make prosecutable cases against offenders, which entails decoys resorting to manipulation tactics otherwise typical for offender behaviour. In all essence, this often leads to a dialogue with two adults using grooming tactics on each other, and the resulting models do not capture the patterns of child-offender dialogues.

Contrary to previous research, we have analysed real-world child-offender chat logs from closed forums. Our data set, selected dialogues (ca. 500 pages) from a corpus of ca. 12 000 A4-pages was thematically analysed and categorised using NVivo 10 software. The coding was done by both authors for inter-rater reliability. Where coding differed, the authors explored the categorisation until agreement was reached (cf., Whittle et al., 2013). The material was also compared to decoy-offender chat logs (ca. 100 pages, publically available on perverted-justice.com).

The analysis of the different data sets reveal quite different pictures of the grooming process. While previous models describe the grooming process as sequential (O’Connell, 2004) or thematic (Williams et al., 2013), our findings suggest a far more complex behavioural pattern – significantly diverse dialogue patterns with different tactics emerge, depending on whether the respondent is a decoy or a child, and their respective responses. The (preliminary) results show differences in both dialogue and process structure. Dialogues with decoys commonly show what can best be described as “artificial compliance”, presumably due to their underlying agenda of generating prosecutable cases. Furthermore, decoys tease out personal information from the offenders, and also share “personal” information about themselves, even when not asked for it.

Child-offender dialogues instead show patterns of reluctance or objections to offender requests for personal information, suggestions of sexual nature, etc. Another offender tactic is threats to obtain compliance, which was not found in any of the analysed decoy-offender dialogues. Other deviations include differences in dialogue length, number of dialogue turns, and complexity, with regard to changes in topics and offender tactics. Further research is necessary for a more thorough understanding of online grooming, and new models are needed that reflect real-world grooming processes. This includes offender behaviours, reasoning, decisions, and tactics used in grooming. Further, such knowledge is of outmost importance for risk awareness measures for young people so they can better cope with online challenges and risks, and make sensible judgements and decisions in online interactions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Skövde: , 2015
Series
Skövde University Studies in Informatics, ISSN 1653-2325 ; 2015:3
National Category
Interaction Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-11628 (URN)978-91-978513-8-1 (ISBN)
Conference
2015 Swecog Conference, The Swedish Cognitive Science Society
Available from: 2015-10-26 Created: 2015-10-26 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Wilhelmsson, U., Toftedahl, M., Susi, T., Torstensson, N., Sjölin, A. & Tuori, P. (2014). A Computer Game for an Enhanced Visitor Experience: Integration of Reality and Fiction. In: Katherine Blashki & Yincai Xiao (Ed.), Proceedings of the International Conference on Interfaces and Human Computer Interaction 2014 Game and Entertainment Technologies 2014 and Computer Graphics, Visualization, Computer Vision and Image Processing 2014 - Part of the Multi Conference on Computer Science and Information Systems, MCCSIS 2014: . Paper presented at 7th International Conference on Game and Entertainment Technologies 2014, GET2014, 15–17 July, Lisbon, Portugal (pp. 149-156). IADIS Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Computer Game for an Enhanced Visitor Experience: Integration of Reality and Fiction
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2014 (English)In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Interfaces and Human Computer Interaction 2014 Game and Entertainment Technologies 2014 and Computer Graphics, Visualization, Computer Vision and Image Processing 2014 - Part of the Multi Conference on Computer Science and Information Systems, MCCSIS 2014 / [ed] Katherine Blashki & Yincai Xiao, IADIS Press, 2014, p. 149-156Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper describes the development of a computer game for enhanced visitor experiences of an adventure tour, in which the game is integrated. The game project was run 2011-2013 and included the development of an arcade style two player cooperative computer game, game controls, graphics, sound and music. The adventure tour takes place in an old military fortress where visitors participate in searching for gold that has been stolen. The tour starts with a 3D movie that provides the plot and introduces hero and villain characters. The story is then carried forth by a game master who brings the visitors on a tour along the fortress’ vaults, during which they also play the computer game. The adventure tour is structured by a semi-fictional framing story that interweaves history, physical environment, and hero and villain characters. To withhold interdependency in the overall design of the adventure tour and the game, Caillois’s (1958/2001) taxonomy for games was chosen as a basis, combined with narrative key elements carried across the adventure tour. The game was also designed to accord with the embodied nature of human activity, allowing players to engage their whole bodies in the gameplay. Initial game evaluation results indicate the game contributes to an enhanced visitor experience of the adventure tour.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IADIS Press, 2014
National Category
Media Engineering
Research subject
Technology; Technology; Technology; Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-9076 (URN)2-s2.0-84929334178 (Scopus ID)978-989-8533-22-7 (ISBN)
Conference
7th International Conference on Game and Entertainment Technologies 2014, GET2014, 15–17 July, Lisbon, Portugal
Projects
Karlsborgs fästningsäventyr
Note

The project is funded by Karlsborgs Turism AB, Västra Götalandsregionen, Skaraborgs Kommunalförbund, Karlsborgs kommun, and Länsstyrelsen landsbygdsprogram. Other partners in the project have been Bjerkne & Co, NBI i Växjö – Storytelling för strategisk kommunikation and Folkuniversitetet.

Available from: 2014-09-15 Created: 2014-05-13 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Torstensson, N. & Sullivan, K. P. H. (2011). The Court Interpreter: Creating an interpretation of the facts. International Journal of Law, Language and Discourse, 1(3), 64-86
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Court Interpreter: Creating an interpretation of the facts
2011 (English)In: International Journal of Law, Language and Discourse, ISSN 1839-8308, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 64-86Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A fair trail is impossible without an interpreter when anyone taking part in the court proceedings does not know the national language, yet the use of an interpreter affects the judging of an immigrant and perhaps their right to a trial as fair as the one offred to a native speaker of the national language. At times courtroom conversation using an interpreter gets confusing, interrupted, and breaks down. These disfluencies can be the result of a lack of linguistic and cultural insight by any of the parties. This paper focuses on how interpreters and legal staff perceive the court interpreter's role, and the creation of the interpretation. Using qualitative semi-structured interviews, it became clear that the interpreter and the lay judge hold different views. The interviews also revealed a degree of mutual mistrust. Yet, in spite of this, a feeling that the bilingual communication in the courts works reasonable well most of the time also came through in the interviews and that with better education for all parties the courtroom could become a fairer legal context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Journal of Law, Language & Discourse Press, 2011
Keywords
interpreter, discourse, courtroom, disfluencies
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Research subject
Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-6302 (URN)
Available from: 2012-08-20 Created: 2012-08-20 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Torstensson, N. (2010). Judging the Immigrant: Accents and Attitudes. (Doctoral dissertation). Department of Language Studies, Umeå University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Judging the Immigrant: Accents and Attitudes
2010 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Spoken language as a means of communication contains huge amounts of information apart from the linguistic message that is conveyed. It is often the first channel of interaction between people and based on the speaker’s manner of talk, we create a mental image of the speaker as a person, of the speaker’s background, origin and personal qualities. Through five case studies, this dissertation investigates how immigrants to Sweden are judged based on their foreign accents (Cases 1—3) and how the use of an interpreter in court can affect the legal process and the judging of the immigrant (Cases 4—5). Case 1 investigated Swedish students’ attitudes towards immigration and immigrants through a survey-based study and revealed that Swedish students hold predominantly positive attitudes towards immigrations and immigrants. Case 2, using accent imitation, asked if Swedish speakers have a cognitive prototype for British English accented Swedish and found that this was the case. This demonstrated that Swedes have models of accented Swedish accents. Case 3 asked Swedish students to rate their impressions of speakers of nine foreign accented Swedish voices on 18 six-point semantic differential scales. They also rated their impressions of each voice for five social factors. The results suggest that the listeners evaluated the voices based on perceived social desirability, or perceived cultural distance between the listener and the voice’s country of origin. Juxtaposing these findings with those of Case 1 suggests that even among a group who are positive to immigrants and immigration some groups of immigrants are more welcome than others. Case 4 examined discourse disfluencies in a bilingual court hearing and a Swedish-Polish bilingual court hearing in detail. The case showed that most of the dialogue-related difficulties have other sources than the interpreter, even if the interpreter at first glance often appeared to be part of the problem rather than part of the solution. Case 5 examined the interpreter’s role in courtroom dialogue situations through interviews with a court interpreter and a lay judge. The study found that the picture of the interpreter’s role differs between the various actors in the court setting. This, in combination with a lack of knowledge about cultural differences in dialogue strategies, creates complications, can have an impact on the perception of the witness and, ultimately, affect the legal rights of the accused. Furthermore, as the interpreter most frequently speaks foreign accented Swedish, the perception and evaluation of their foreign accented Swedish can further place some immigrant groups at a double legal disadvantage when being judged.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Department of Language Studies, Umeå University, 2010. p. 118
Series
Umeå Studies in Cognitive Science, ISSN 1654-2568 ; 7
Keywords
Foreign accent evaluation, native reactions, attitudes, court interpretation, forensic linguistics, cognitive prototype, legal judgement
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-3836 (URN)978-91-7264-882-1 (ISBN)
Public defence
(English)
Available from: 2010-04-09 Created: 2010-04-01 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Gawronska, B., Torstensson, N. & Erlendsson, B. (2004). Defining and Classifying Space Builders for Information Extraction. In: Natural Language Understanding and Cognitive Science: Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Natural Language Understanding and Cognitive Science, NLUCS 2004. In conjunction with ICEIS 2004, Porto, Portugal, April 2004 (pp. 15-27).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Defining and Classifying Space Builders for Information Extraction
2004 (English)In: Natural Language Understanding and Cognitive Science: Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Natural Language Understanding and Cognitive Science, NLUCS 2004. In conjunction with ICEIS 2004, Porto, Portugal, April 2004, 2004, p. 15-27Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-2196 (URN)972-8865-05-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2007-07-06 Created: 2007-07-06 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Torstensson, N., Eriksson, E. J. & Sullivan, K. P. H. (2004). Mimicked accents: Do speakers have similar cognitive prototypes?. In: Proceedings of the 10th Australian International Conference on Speech Science & Technology: . Paper presented at 10th Australian International Conference on Speech Science & Technology, Macquarie University, Sydney, December 8 to 10, 2004 (pp. 271-276). Australian Speech Science & Technology Association Inc.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mimicked accents: Do speakers have similar cognitive prototypes?
2004 (English)In: Proceedings of the 10th Australian International Conference on Speech Science & Technology, Australian Speech Science & Technology Association Inc. , 2004, p. 271-276Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

There are several possible situations in which perpetrators might want to disguise their voices in order to avoid identification and to deflect the search for them to another person or group of individuals. One possible manner that can be used for voice disguise is the adoption of another accent. This paper examines the mimicking of the British-English Swedish accent, that is mimicking of the Swedish spoken by native British English speakers, by native Swedish speakers. It was found that the speakers selected similar and prominent features of the British-English Swedish accent in their first spontaneous recordings, and that the mimicked accent was impacted upon at word and suprasegmental level after having listened to a native speaker.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Australian Speech Science & Technology Association Inc., 2004
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-1608 (URN)
Conference
10th Australian International Conference on Speech Science & Technology, Macquarie University, Sydney, December 8 to 10, 2004
Available from: 2007-08-01 Created: 2007-08-01 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Torstensson, N. (2004). Newstalk: reductions in careful, scripted speech. In: FONETIK 2004: The XVIIth Swedish Phonetics Conference. Paper presented at FONETIK 2004, May 26-28, Stockholm University, Sweden (pp. 16-19).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Newstalk: reductions in careful, scripted speech
2004 (English)In: FONETIK 2004: The XVIIth Swedish Phonetics Conference, 2004, p. 16-19Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The area of articulatory reductions in spontaneous connected speech has been studied for a number of languages, and has contributed to important knowledge about speech communication, production and perception of speech. The work presented here concerns the domain of connected speech, but instead of spontaneous speech, scripted speech is in the focus of attention. The point of interest is to see to what degree (if any) articulatory reductions appear in a formal context with high demands for intelligibility as in news programs. Read speech from the national Swedish TVnews is analyzed. Reduced forms are viewed more carefully, and related to existing theories on connected speech. ome patterns for reductions are found, and compared to findings in spontaneous speech.

Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-2204 (URN)
Conference
FONETIK 2004, May 26-28, Stockholm University, Sweden
Available from: 2007-10-10 Created: 2007-10-10 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
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