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Berg Marklund, BjörnORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1458-8557
Publications (10 of 30) Show all publications
Bai, H., Berg Marklund, B. & Wilhelmsson, U. (2023). A Model for Balancing Clarity and Appeal in Serious Game Visuals. In: Proceedings of the 17th European Conference on Games Based Learning: . Paper presented at The 17th European Conference on Games Based Learning, ECGBL, 5 - 6 October 2023, Enschede, Netherlands (pp. 46-52). Academic Conferences International Limited
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Model for Balancing Clarity and Appeal in Serious Game Visuals
2023 (English)In: Proceedings of the 17th European Conference on Games Based Learning, Academic Conferences International Limited , 2023, p. 46-52Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In serious game development, graphic design needs to be eye-catching, while also depicting subject matter content in a responsible, accurate, and clear way. Previous research has shown that abstract and symbolic game visuals seem to be preferable for learning and providing an engaging experience. Our research focuses on describing the challenges involved in creating effective visual communication through game graphics in cross cultures. In particular, we’re interested in examining if certain styles of visual communication are more or less effective between different cultural demographics. To examine this, we have created a serious game which aims to promote healthy food and nutrition habits to teenagers in both Nepalese and Swedish schools and by doing so also motivate behavioral changes toward healthier eating habits. We are currently conducting studies to see whether preferences and image recognition differ between the two demographical spheres. This paper will only discuss the exploratory study done in Nepal. Ultimately, this paper aims to contribute development guidelines that can aid developers in creating more effective visual communication in their serious games, and we primarily focus on exploring what we call the compromise of ‘clarity’ and ‘appeal’ in the creation of game graphics. We present an initial model for choosing at what level in terms of realism/abstraction and taxonomic hierarchy the graphical components of serious games optimally should be produced in order to solve the dilemma of precise, unmistakable, yet appealing visuals in serious games. It all comes down to two primary decisions: defining the taxonomic hierarchy of the items to depict, and choosing the style in which to depict them. With a better understanding of when different game visuals are more or less appropriate, both in terms of style and in which objects are represented, game developers will be able to balance production costs better while also creating something that strikes the compromise between clarity and appeal.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Conferences International Limited, 2023
Series
Proceedings of the European conference on games-based learning, ISSN 2049-0992, E-ISSN 2049-100X ; 17:1
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Interaction Technologies
Research subject
GAME Research Group
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-23296 (URN)10.34190/ecgbl.17.1.1633 (DOI)2-s2.0-85179006436 (Scopus ID)978-1-914587-88-7 (ISBN)978-1-914587-89-4 (ISBN)
Conference
The 17th European Conference on Games Based Learning, ECGBL, 5 - 6 October 2023, Enschede, Netherlands
Available from: 2023-10-06 Created: 2023-10-06 Last updated: 2024-01-04Bibliographically approved
Bai, H., Berg Marklund, B. & Zhang, R. (2022). An Exploratory Study on Nepalese Teenager’s Visual Recognition and Preferences in Serious Games. In: Proceedings 2022 IEEE International Conference on e-Business Engineering ICEBE 2022: 14-16 October 2022 Bournemouth, United Kingdom. Paper presented at IEEE International Conference on E-Business Engineering (ICEBE), 14–16 October 2022 Bournemouth, United Kingdom (pp. 13-18). IEEE Computer Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Exploratory Study on Nepalese Teenager’s Visual Recognition and Preferences in Serious Games
2022 (English)In: Proceedings 2022 IEEE International Conference on e-Business Engineering ICEBE 2022: 14-16 October 2022 Bournemouth, United Kingdom, IEEE Computer Society, 2022, p. 13-18Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In serious game development, effective communication through both languages, sounds, and icons can be crucial for a game to have its intended impact. While this is also true for entertainment games, serious games have added layers of challenges as they are a) often played by audiences outside of the “typical” game ecosystem, and b) miscommunication can lead to players missing important lessons or even learning incorrect information. When a serious game is intended to be used in different parts of the world, however, clear visual communication gets an added layer of complexity: culturally informed symbol interpretation and visual preference. In order to examine how these might affect players’ experiences when playing serious games, this paper presents the results of a mixed-method study conducted in two schools in Nepal. The study included 10 participants, between 13-16 years old, who played a prototype of a mobile game currently in development, which has the purpose of teaching young players about food nutrition and healthy habits. After playing the prototype, they took a short survey where they were asked to identify different food types, and they were also interviewed to discuss their opinions of the game’s visual style. The results of the study indicate that, while higher fidelity images were much easier to correctly identify by the participants, the participants’ preference for visual fidelity varied to a large degree.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE Computer Society, 2022
Keywords
serious games, educational games, visual fidelity, visual preference, healthy habits, art direction
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Interaction Technologies
Research subject
GAME Research Group
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-21988 (URN)10.1109/ICEBE55470.2022.00011 (DOI)2-s2.0-85148649716 (Scopus ID)978-1-6654-9244-7 (ISBN)978-1-6654-9245-4 (ISBN)
Conference
IEEE International Conference on E-Business Engineering (ICEBE), 14–16 October 2022 Bournemouth, United Kingdom
Available from: 2022-10-31 Created: 2022-10-31 Last updated: 2023-08-21Bibliographically approved
Berg Marklund, B. (2022). Det spelande klassrummet: möjligheter och dolda utmaningar. In: Sofia Lundmark; Janne Kontio (Ed.), Digitala didaktiska dilemman: (pp. 113-140). Stockholm: Natur och kultur
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Det spelande klassrummet: möjligheter och dolda utmaningar
2022 (Swedish)In: Digitala didaktiska dilemman / [ed] Sofia Lundmark; Janne Kontio, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2022, p. 113-140Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2022
Keywords
spelbaserat lärande, lärospel, gamification, digital natives, spelutveckling
National Category
Interaction Technologies Pedagogy
Research subject
GAME Research Group
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-21671 (URN)978-91-27-46026-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-08-09 Created: 2022-08-09 Last updated: 2022-10-17Bibliographically approved
Bai, H., Zhang, R., Berg Marklund, B. & Wilhelmsson, U. (2022). Game graphics and effective learning: A review of visual communication research in serious games. In: Katherine Blashki (Ed.), Proceedings of the International Conferences Interfaces and Human Computer Interaction 2022, Game and Entertainment Technologies 2022: . Paper presented at 16th Multi Conference on Computer Science and Information Systems, International Conferences Interfaces and Human Computer Interaction 2022 and Game and Entertainment Technologies 2022 (MCCSIS), 19-22 July 2022, Lisbon, Portugal (pp. 165-173). IADIS Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Game graphics and effective learning: A review of visual communication research in serious games
2022 (English)In: Proceedings of the International Conferences Interfaces and Human Computer Interaction 2022, Game and Entertainment Technologies 2022 / [ed] Katherine Blashki, IADIS Press, 2022, p. 165-173Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The visuals of a game is a crucial element when it comes to providing good player experiences. Visuals are also an incredibly complex subject in a game context since different modes of visual representation can be more or less “appropriate” for different settings. For example, while one can look at photo-realism as an impressive feature of a game due to its technical complexity and functionally accurate representation of real-world objects, it might still not be a fitting choice for different audiences, or for different pedagogical strategies. Serious game research seldom focuses on understanding the design of these components or their applicability to different types of learning, and it more often focuses on games’ mechanics and how well they manage to capture subject matter content while still being engaging. The aim of this paper is to explore the gap in visual communication research, describing what studies tend to focus on providing some valuable context. This review was conducted on papers that dealt with visual aspects of serious games. The results show that visual communication is rarely addressed in serious game development research. Future research would benefit from taking visual communication in detail to facilitate the effectiveness of serious games.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IADIS Press, 2022
Keywords
Serious Games, Literature Review, Visual Communication, Visual Design, Game Design, Learning Outcome
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
GAME Research Group
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-21691 (URN)2-s2.0-85142268771 (Scopus ID)978-989-8704-41-2 (ISBN)
Conference
16th Multi Conference on Computer Science and Information Systems, International Conferences Interfaces and Human Computer Interaction 2022 and Game and Entertainment Technologies 2022 (MCCSIS), 19-22 July 2022, Lisbon, Portugal
Note

ADIS – International Association for the Development of the Information Society

Available from: 2022-08-18 Created: 2022-08-18 Last updated: 2023-02-14Bibliographically approved
Berg Marklund, B. & Goyal, A. (2022). Postcolonial Threads in GUX: a Conversation (1ed.). In: Rebecca Rouse; Björn Berg Marklund; Anna-Sofia Alklind Taylor (Ed.), What Happens When We Play: A Critical Approach to Games User Experience Design & Education (pp. 67-81). Pittsburgh, PA: ETC Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Postcolonial Threads in GUX: a Conversation
2022 (English)In: What Happens When We Play: A Critical Approach to Games User Experience Design & Education / [ed] Rebecca Rouse; Björn Berg Marklund; Anna-Sofia Alklind Taylor, Pittsburgh, PA: ETC Press, 2022, 1, p. 67-81Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

Videogames have a long, and complex, relationship with “non-Western” countries. Game narratives and ludic symbols are fraught with implicit, or explicit, imperialist history and ideologies. In some games, such as Sid Meier’s Colonization, the connection is fairly obvious. But a game doesn’t have to be about colonization to present a colonialist narrative. Souvik Mukherjee is a game researcher at the front of a growing discussion on this topic. In his work, he analyses games from different perspective (media analysis, philosophy, and sociology) to present a holistic understanding of the way games represent, and constructs, different cultures, people, political systems, ethics, and societal issues. This chapter is an edited transcript of an interview with Souvik, where we talked about everything from his academic work, to how he modded Age of Empires in his childhood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Pittsburgh, PA: ETC Press, 2022 Edition: 1
Keywords
postcolonialism, western game development, orientalism
National Category
Media Studies Ethnology History of Ideas
Research subject
GAME Research Group
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-22439 (URN)978-1-387-44165-5 (ISBN)978-1-387-43483-1 (ISBN)
Note

CC BY-NC-ND

All images appearing in this work are property of the respective copyright owners, and are not released into the Creative Commons. The respective owners reserve all rights.

Carnegie Mellon ETC Press

Available from: 2023-04-21 Created: 2023-04-21 Last updated: 2023-08-21Bibliographically approved
Rouse, R., Berg Marklund, B. & Alklind Taylor, A.-S. (Eds.). (2022). What Happens When We Play: A Critical Approach to Games User Experience Design & Education. ETC Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What Happens When We Play: A Critical Approach to Games User Experience Design & Education
2022 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

What Happens When We Play: A Critical Approach to Games User Experience Design & Education brings together research and reflection from both faculty and graduate students involved in University of Skövde’s Games User Experience (GUX) Master’s program, launched in 2020. The collection shares insights from the new GUX curriculum, which takes a critical-making approach, combining practical projects done in collaboration with game studios, critical cultural theory and history, and design theory and hands-on work in the practice of games user experience design and analysis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ETC Press, 2022. p. 437
National Category
Design
Research subject
GAME Research Group; Interaction Lab (ILAB)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-22195 (URN)10.57862/nh1h-nz56 (DOI)978-1-387-44165-5 (ISBN)978-1-387-43483-1 (ISBN)
Note

CC BY-NC-ND 2.5

All images appearing in this work are property of the respective copyright owners, and are not released into the Creative Commons. The respective owners reserve all rights.

Carnegie Mellon ETC Press

Available from: 2023-01-19 Created: 2023-01-19 Last updated: 2023-08-21Bibliographically approved
Berg Marklund, B. & Romin, R. (2020). Bad Game, Good Learning: Examining the Contradictions of Digital Game-Based Learning. In: Panagiotis Fotaris (Ed.), Proceedings of the 14th European Conference on Game Based Learning: A Virtual Conference hosted by The University of Brighton. Paper presented at 14th European Conference on Game Based Learning (ECGBL 2020) hosted by The University of Brighton, UK on 24 – 25th September 2020 (pp. 67-76). Reading, UK: Academic Conferences and Publishing International Limited
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bad Game, Good Learning: Examining the Contradictions of Digital Game-Based Learning
2020 (English)In: Proceedings of the 14th European Conference on Game Based Learning: A Virtual Conference hosted by The University of Brighton / [ed] Panagiotis Fotaris, Reading, UK: Academic Conferences and Publishing International Limited, 2020, p. 67-76Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper aims to explore some of the inherent dichotomies between games and learning. This is not referring to the already thoroughly discussed challenge of merging learning content into appealing and engaging game design, but rather to a more fundamental question whether games, as a medium and as technological objects, are well suited to convey learning content. In order to anchor this discussion in something more concrete, the paper will describe a project in which a learning game was created, and describe some of the main development and design challenges encountered during the project. These challenges revealed a necessity of often going in directions directly opposed to what is considered to be good game design principles, as well as limitations in what type of messages the medium of digital games can efficiently convey. For example, clear goals and progression, feedback on actions, providing players with clear information, and empowering player agency, while often suitable in creating good games, are not suitable when representing complex issues in educational games. Based on these insights, the paper concludes with a broader discussion regarding the validity of some core tenets of game-based learning, and calls for a less instrument-focused and game-oriented way of creating and discussing games’ relationship to learning and education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Reading, UK: Academic Conferences and Publishing International Limited, 2020
Series
Proceedings of the European Conference on Games Based Learning, ISSN 2049-0992, E-ISSN 2049-100X
Keywords
game-based learning development, game design, designing for learning, Flow, game industry
National Category
Interaction Technologies Pedagogy
Research subject
Interaction Lab (ILAB)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-19111 (URN)10.34190/GBL.20.079 (DOI)2-s2.0-85096688040 (Scopus ID)978-1-912764-70-9 (ISBN)978-1-912764-71-6 (ISBN)
Conference
14th European Conference on Game Based Learning (ECGBL 2020) hosted by The University of Brighton, UK on 24 – 25th September 2020
Note

Inkluderar material från ett utvecklingsprojekt finansierat av SLU Holding, med samverkan från Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet.

Available from: 2020-09-25 Created: 2020-09-25 Last updated: 2020-12-29Bibliographically approved
Berg Marklund, B., Rouse, R. & Holloway-Attaway, L. (2020). Contextualizing Game Literacy: A transhistorical approach to understanding Game-Based Learning environments. In: Georgios N. Yannakakis, Antonios Liapis, Penny Kyburz, Vanessa Volz, Foaad Khosmood, Phil Lopes (Ed.), Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games: FDG 2020. Paper presented at 15th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games (FDG ’20), September 15–18, 2020, Bugibba, Malta. New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), Article ID 108.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contextualizing Game Literacy: A transhistorical approach to understanding Game-Based Learning environments
2020 (English)In: Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games: FDG 2020 / [ed] Georgios N. Yannakakis, Antonios Liapis, Penny Kyburz, Vanessa Volz, Foaad Khosmood, Phil Lopes, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020, article id 108Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The nature of ‘reading’ different types of texts, across all media, is fundamentally beholden to the concept of ‘literacy’. The concept of literacy is well established in media studies – from books, to film, and visual, performing and interactive arts – and as such it has a wide range of applicability. All forms of media constitute a semiotic milieu in which signifiers and codes mean different things depending on the form’s unique language and the contexts and manner in which individual participants, or “readers”, approach them. In the field of digital games research, literacy is commonly defined as a narrower concept that refers to the ability to identify affordances and interact with game components with a high degree of confidence. This focus on capability is understandable to a degree: the unique aspect of games as a medium is often considered to specifically be its interactability, and thus being able to interact becomes synonymous with being ‘game literate’. In this paper, however, we will both describe how literacy in games would benefit from a more nuanced, transhistorical view of interactability, as well as provide examples from many kinds of media beyond games to demonstrate that interaction literacy is neither novel nor unique to the medium of games. Understanding this rich history would provide a broader foundation of referential literature for game scholars to use when discussing the concept of game literacy and the interactability of media in general.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020
Keywords
Game literacy, game-based learning, transhistorical, somatic experience, interactive immersive environments, storyworld design
National Category
Pedagogy Human Aspects of ICT History of Technology
Research subject
Interaction Lab (ILAB); Media, Technology and Culture (MTEC)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-19086 (URN)10.1145/3402942.3409610 (DOI)2-s2.0-85092324210 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-8807-8 (ISBN)
Conference
15th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games (FDG ’20), September 15–18, 2020, Bugibba, Malta
Note

Permission to make digital or hard copies of part or all of this work for personal or classroom use is granted without fee provided that copies are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice and the full citation on the first page. Copyrights for third-party components of this work must be honored. For all other uses, contact the owner/author(s).

Available from: 2020-09-22 Created: 2020-09-22 Last updated: 2021-01-04Bibliographically approved
Gómez-Maureira, M. A., Kniestedt, I., Dingli, S., Farrugia, D. M. & Berg Marklund, B. (2020). CURIO 2.0: A Local Network Multiplayer Game Kit to Encourage Inquisitive Mindsets. In: Georgios N. Yannakakis, Antonios Liapis, Penny Kyburz, Vanessa Volz, Foaad Khosmood, Phil Lopes (Ed.), Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games: FDG 2020. Paper presented at 15th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games (FDG ’20), September 15–18, 2020, Bugibba, Malta. New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), Article ID 76.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>CURIO 2.0: A Local Network Multiplayer Game Kit to Encourage Inquisitive Mindsets
Show others...
2020 (English)In: Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games: FDG 2020 / [ed] Georgios N. Yannakakis, Antonios Liapis, Penny Kyburz, Vanessa Volz, Foaad Khosmood, Phil Lopes, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020, article id 76Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Research has found that successful game-based learning (GBL) is dependent on several factors, e.g. students, parents, teachers and educational setting. Nevertheless, many existing GBL solutions primarily consider the student. Similarly, they focus on imparting and assessing content-specific knowledge rather than encouraging students to become intrinsically motivated learners. This paper presents CURIO, an educational game kit that involves teachers as ‘game masters’. It encourages inquisitive mindsets in students and helps to structure discussions when introducing a new topic in class. It informs the teacher of students’ pre-existing knowledge so that they can better shape upcoming classes to their needs. A pilot study with a class of 25 primary school students and their homeroom teacher evaluated a prototype of CURIO. The paper concludes with guidelines learned from creating and testing CURIO that can help with the development of tools for teachers using the same design philosophy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020
Keywords
game-based learning, GBL, videogames, serious games, games for education
National Category
Information Systems Learning
Research subject
Interaction Lab (ILAB)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-19085 (URN)10.1145/3402942.3403003 (DOI)2-s2.0-85092273313 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-8807-8 (ISBN)
Conference
15th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games (FDG ’20), September 15–18, 2020, Bugibba, Malta
Projects
CURIO: Designing a Game-Based Learning Digital Toolkit for Children in STEM. Funded by EU/Erasmus+.
Available from: 2020-09-22 Created: 2020-09-22 Last updated: 2020-10-28Bibliographically approved
Holloway-Attaway, L. & Berg Marklund, B. (2020). Performing Heritage and Creating Community Through Digital Games, Narrative Agency and Critical Play. In: : . Paper presented at MW20, the 24th annual MuseWeb conference, online, March 31-April 4, 2020.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Performing Heritage and Creating Community Through Digital Games, Narrative Agency and Critical Play
2020 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Interactive digital media, and in particular digital games, are an increasingly prevalent component of museums and other public cultural spaces to help engage visitors. However, despite their growing presence, they remain under-explored in the ways they mediate a wide variety of cultural expressions and interactions through their differing and unique narrative affordances. Such storytelling differences must be accounted for in order to understand how they may be facilitated and curated with visitors/players in mind. The medium is defined by diminished authorial control in favor of free play and individual agency of expression for players. As such games for heritage present interesting challenges for those who may want to develop, facilitate, and curate them in cultural contexts and with historically accurate content. In fact, the lack of control over content once it becomes interactive and playful can present significant challenges to museum curators, pedagogues and guides. As facilitators of cultural knowledge, they often need to strike a balance between informing visitors/players about cultural heritage and history through deliberately crafted narratives - something museums are well equipped to do - while also providing players with more agency to individually express themselves and to re-write cultural heritage stories and histories through narrative play. In this paper, we present three case studies that exemplify how digital games can be used to give children a less restrictive narrative framework in which they can perform and express history and cultural heritage, rather than by merely re-enacting it. Through these three cases, we describe the processes involved in using digital games as a collaborative stage, or performative platform, on which participants can craft their own narratives to experience and express their own histories and build connections to others in a shared community of play.

Keywords
cultural heritage, serious games, co-design, critical play, performance, storytelling
National Category
Human Aspects of ICT Media Studies Interaction Technologies
Research subject
Media, Technology and Culture (MTEC); Interaction Lab (ILAB)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-18989 (URN)
Conference
MW20, the 24th annual MuseWeb conference, online, March 31-April 4, 2020
Available from: 2020-09-03 Created: 2020-09-03 Last updated: 2020-12-30
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1458-8557

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