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Thapa, D. R., Subedi, M., Ekström-Bergström, A., Areskoug Josefsson, K. & Krettek, A. (2023). A Qualitative Evaluation and Cross-Cultural Adaptation of the Short Form of the Sense of Coherence Scale (SOC-13) in Nepali. Kathmandu University Medical Journal, 21(82), 254-259
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Qualitative Evaluation and Cross-Cultural Adaptation of the Short Form of the Sense of Coherence Scale (SOC-13) in Nepali
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2023 (English)In: Kathmandu University Medical Journal, ISSN 1812-2027, E-ISSN 1812-2078, Vol. 21, no 82, p. 254-259Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Sense of Coherence (SOC) relates to an individual’s overall life orientation, and stronger SOC is associated with better health, quality of life, and coping strategies. When our research group used the SOC-13 questionnaire for the first time in Nepal, we identified difficulties in response patterns. The findings necessitated further evaluation of the Nepali version of the SOC-13 questionnaire.

Objective

To qualitatively evaluate the SOC-13 questionnaire in Nepali for cross-cultural adaptation.

Method

Nineteen nurses were interviewed. We used the methodological approach of “think aloud” to obtain a deeper understanding of the interferences of the scales. Transcribed materials were analyzed using a deductive approach through qualitative content analysis. The original translated version of the SOC-13 questionnaire in Nepali was modified by replacing words that were easier to understand.

Result

Participants found the questionnaire content general and non-specific but easy to complete. The nurses experienced that the meanings and sentences in some of the items and response alternatives were difficult to understand. However, the overall comprehensiveness of most items and response alternatives was perceived as good. Nurses’ interpretation of the SOC-items in the translated version of the SOC-13 questionnaire in Nepali matched the original English version. Items that were experienced as difficult in the Nepali language were modified to increase their comprehensiveness. Modified items and response alternatives had the same content as before, but some words and meanings were substituted with easier language.

Conclusion

The current revised version of SOC-13 in Nepali is valid and useful to explore individuals’ overall life orientation and their abilities to deal and cope with various life events in the Nepalese context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kathmandu University, 2023
Keywords
Health resources, Qualitative validation, Resources, Ralutogenesis, Sense of coherence
National Category
Nursing Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Research on Citizen Centered Health, University of Skövde (Reacch US)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-23136 (URN)2-s2.0-85169839017 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-25 Created: 2023-08-25 Last updated: 2023-10-10Bibliographically approved
Shakya, D., Flodin, K., Thapa, D. R., Bankler, J. V., Bai, H., Wilhelmsson, U., . . . Krettek, A. (2023). Gaming the Way to Cardiovascular Health in Nepal: A Digital Approach in Adolescents. Paper presented at EPI|Lifestyle Scientific Sessions 2023, Boston, MA, USA, February 28-March 3, 2023. Circulation, 147(1), Article ID AP641.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gaming the Way to Cardiovascular Health in Nepal: A Digital Approach in Adolescents
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2023 (English)In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 147, no 1, article id AP641Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Heart Association, 2023
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Interaction Technologies
Research subject
GAME Research Group; Research on Citizen Centered Health, University of Skövde (Reacch US)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-22320 (URN)10.1161/circ.147.suppl_1.P641 (DOI)001002143900601 ()
Conference
EPI|Lifestyle Scientific Sessions 2023, Boston, MA, USA, February 28-March 3, 2023
Available from: 2023-03-09 Created: 2023-03-09 Last updated: 2023-12-27Bibliographically approved
Thapa, D. R., Subedi, M., Ekström, A., Areskoug Josefsson, K. & Krettek, A. (2022). Facilitators for and barriers to nurses’ work-related health – A qualitative study. BMC Nursing, 21, Article ID 218.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Facilitators for and barriers to nurses’ work-related health – A qualitative study
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2022 (English)In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 21, article id 218Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Work-related health problems, such as work stress, fatigue, and burnout constitute a global challenge within the nursing profession. Work-related health among nurses is not yet a prioritized phenomenon in Nepal. Health-promoting approaches to maintaining and sustaining nurses’ health are therefore essential. The aim of this study was to explore and thereby gain a deeper understanding of how nurses in Nepal’s hospitals experience their everyday work, with a focus on promoting and sustaining their work-related health.

Methods

A qualitative design with semi-structured individual interviews were used. Nineteen registered nurses working at hospitals in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, were individually interviewed between October 6 and December 5, 2018. Transcribed interviews were analyzed through thematic analysis.

Results

Four main themes with belonging eight subthemes were constructed from the analysis: (1) “Sense of meaningfulness and belongingness in work culture” with subthemes; “Open environment” and “Sharing attitude and cooperating for the entire team” (2) “Support and rewards from the management team” with subthemes; “Lacking managerial support” and “Fair evaluation and job promotion opportunities”(3) “Workload and protection against work-related hazards” with subthemes; “Stressful and multitasking in workload” and “Lacking equipment for own health and caring”, and (4) “Motivation through opportunities and activities” with subthemes; “Employment benefits that motivate work”, and “Activities outside of work needed to recover”. These main themes and subthemes described nurses’ facilitators for and barriers to their work environment and health.

Conclusion

Our study highlighted nurses’ experiences with facilitators and barriers to their work-related health. Nurses’ work-related health was positively affected by support from colleagues, managers, and the organization. Conversely, less support from managers, lack of equipment, and unfair judgment were barriers to nurses’ work-related health. This study adds new knowledge about nurses’ work-related health from the context of Nepal. Hospital organizations and nursing managers in similar cultural and healthcare settings can apply the results of our study to develop strategies to promote and sustain nurses’ health and prevent work-related illness.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2022
Keywords
Health promotion, Managerial support, Job resources, Nurses, Stress, Teamwork, Work environment, Work‑related health
National Category
Nursing Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Family-Centred Health; Research on Citizen Centered Health, University of Skövde (Reacch US)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-21088 (URN)10.1186/s12912-022-01003-z (DOI)000836600400001 ()35931988 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85135440648 (Scopus ID)
Note

CC BY 4.0

© The Author(s) 2022. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.

Available from: 2022-04-28 Created: 2022-04-28 Last updated: 2022-10-17Bibliographically approved
Thapa, D. R., Stengård, J., Ekström, A., Areskoug Josefsson, K., Krettek, A. & Nyberg, A. (2022). Job demands, job resources, and health outcomes among nursing professionals in private and public healthcare sectors in Sweden – A prospective study. BMC Nursing, 21, Article ID 140.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Job demands, job resources, and health outcomes among nursing professionals in private and public healthcare sectors in Sweden – A prospective study
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2022 (English)In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 21, article id 140Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Nursing professionals exhibit high prevalence of stress-related health problems. Job demands and job resources are parallel drivers of health and well-being among employees. Better job resources associate with better job satisfaction, job motivation and engagement even when job demands are high. To date, there is limited research which explores the association between job demands, job resources and health outcomes among nursing professionals in the Swedish context. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate Swedish nursing professionals’ job demands and job resources in relation to health outcomes, with comparisons between the private and public healthcare sectors. The specific research questions were as follows: (1) Are there differences between private and public healthcare regarding job demands, job resources, and health outcomes? and (2) Are there prospective associations between job demands and job resources in relation to health outcomes?

Methods

Data were drawn from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) 2016 and 2018, including 520 nurses and 544 assistant nurses working in the private and public healthcare sectors from 2016 (baseline). Data were analyzed using binary logistic regression.

Results

Nursing professionals reported higher threats, lower bullying, lower control, lower social support, and lower cohesion in the public healthcare units compared to the private healthcare units. The prospective analyses showed that job resources in terms of social support and rewards were associated with higher self-rated health and lower burnout. Cohesion was associated with higher self-rated health. Job demands in terms of psychological demands and job efforts were associated with lower self-rated health, higher burnout, and higher sickness absence, while emotional demands were associated with higher burnout.

Conclusions

Nursing professionals’ job resources are deficient in public healthcare units. Job resources are associated with positive health outcomes, whereas job demands are associated with negative health outcomes, among nursing professionals. Strengthening job resources among nursing professionals in the private and public healthcare sectors can promote and sustain their work-related health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2022
Keywords
Demands, Employment sectors, Healthcare, JD-R model, Occupational health, Resources
National Category
Nursing Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Family-Centred Health; Research on Citizen Centered Health, University of Skövde (Reacch US)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-21089 (URN)10.1186/s12912-022-00924-z (DOI)000806789700005 ()35668404 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85131327268 (Scopus ID)
Funder
AFA Insurance, 150474Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009–1758Swedish Research Council, 2013–0164Swedish Research Council, 2013–01646
Note

CC BY 4.0

Correspondence: dip.raj.thapa@his.se

© The Author(s) 2022. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.

© 2022 BioMed Central Ltd unless otherwise stated. Part of Springer Nature.

Open access funding provided by University of Skövde. This work was supported by AFA Insurance (grant 150474), the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (FORTE) through the Stockholm Stress Center (grant 2009–1758), the Swedish Research Council (VR; grant 2013–0164 and 2013–01646) and the School of Health Sciences at the University of Skövde, Sweden. The funders had no role in the study design, data analysis, the preparation of the manuscript or decision to publish the manuscript.

Available from: 2022-04-28 Created: 2022-04-28 Last updated: 2022-07-13Bibliographically approved
Kholmatova, K., Krettek, A., Leon, D. A., Malyutina, S., Cook, S., Hopstock, L. A., . . . Kudryavtsev, A. V. (2022). Obesity Prevalence and Associated Socio-Demographic Characteristics and Health Behaviors in Russia and Norway. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 19(15), Article ID 9428.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Obesity Prevalence and Associated Socio-Demographic Characteristics and Health Behaviors in Russia and Norway
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2022 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 15, article id 9428Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Associations between obesity and socio-demographic and behavioral characteristics varybetween populations. Exploring such differences should throw light on factors related to obesity. Weexamined associations between general obesity (GO, defined by body mass index) and abdominalobesity (AO, defined by waist-to-hip ratio) and sex, age, socio-economic characteristics (education,financial situation, marital status), smoking and alcohol consumption in women and men aged40–69 yearsfrom the Know Your Heart study (KYH, Russia,N= 4121, 2015–2018) and the seventhTromsø Study (Tromsø7, Norway,N= 17,646, 2015–2016). Age-standardized prevalence of GO andAO was higher in KYH compared to Tromsø7 women (36.7 vs. 22.0% and 44.2 vs. 18.4%, respectively)and similar among men (26.0 vs. 25.7% and 74.8 vs. 72.2%, respectively). The positive associationof age with GO and AO was stronger in KYH vs. Tromsø7 women and for AO it was stronger inmen in Tromsø7 vs. KYH. Associations between GO and socio-economic characteristics were similarin KYH and Tromsø7, except for a stronger association with living with spouse/partner in KYHmen. Smoking had a positive association with AO in men in Tromsø7 and in women in both studies.Frequent drinking was negatively associated with GO and AO in Tromsø7 participants and positivelyassociated with GO in KYH men. We found similar obesity prevalence in Russian and Norwegianmen but higher obesity prevalence in Russian compared to Norwegian women. Other results suggestthat the stronger association of obesity with age in Russian women is the major driver of the higherobesity prevalence among them compared to women in Norway.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2022
Keywords
obesity, waist-to-hip ratio, cross-sectional study, socio-demographic factors, smoking, alcohol, sex, Russia, Norway
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Research on Citizen Centered Health, University of Skövde (Reacch US)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-21729 (URN)10.3390/ijerph19159428 (DOI)000839049100001 ()35954782 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85136343163 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Wellcome trust, 100217
Note

CC BY 4.0

Correspondence: kamila.k.kholmatova@uit.no

Funding: The KYH study was part of the International Project on Cardiovascular Disease in Russia (IPCDR). It was funded by the Wellcome Trust Strategic Award (100217), by funds from UiT The Arctic University of Norway; Norwegian Institute of Public Health; the Norwegian Ministry of Health and Social Affairs. Tromsø7 was funded by UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Northern Norway Regional Health Authority, Norwegian Ministry of Health and Social Services, and Troms County. Contribution of Sofia Malyutina was supported by the Russian Academy of Science, State target (#122031700094).

Available from: 2022-08-25 Created: 2022-08-25 Last updated: 2022-10-17Bibliographically approved
Backlund, P., Bai, H., Bankler, V., Krettek, A., Wilhelmsson, U. & Zhang, R. (2022). Teaching cardiovascular health through a purposeful game. In: Collection of materials: II International Scientific and Practical Internet Conference "Innovative Solutions in Economy, Business, Public Communications and International Relationships", April 21, 2022, Dnipro: Volume 2. Paper presented at II International Scientific and Practical Internet Conference "Innovative Solutions in Economy, Business, Public Communications and International Relationships", April 21, 2022, Dnipro (pp. 391-396). Dnipro: Університет митної справи та фінансів / Universytet mytnoyi spravy ta finansiv, 2
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teaching cardiovascular health through a purposeful game
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2022 (English)In: Collection of materials: II International Scientific and Practical Internet Conference "Innovative Solutions in Economy, Business, Public Communications and International Relationships", April 21, 2022, Dnipro: Volume 2, Dnipro: Університет митної справи та фінансів / Universytet mytnoyi spravy ta finansiv , 2022, Vol. 2, p. 5p. 391-396Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Games for health is one of the most prominent areas for serious games, i.e. games with a purpose beyond only entertainment. The purpose of a health game may be to inform about health related issues; promote healthy lifestyles and even to drive behavioral change. This paper outlines the initial game design considerations and some future research directions for a game focusing on cardiovascular health. As the overall aim of the project is to promote a healthy lifestyle through diet and physical activity to prevent future cardiovascular disease, we focused on “taking care of your heart” as the basis for the game. Hence we call the game Happy Heart and use a heart symbol as a non-playable character (NPC) that the player needs to take care of. To some extent we are inspired by the electronic Tamagochi toys (Bandai) where players need to take care of a digital pet. The heart symbol is universal and is also an ideograph that expresses the concept of love and as such it transcends language barriers.

The burden of non-communicable diseases (NCD) is rapidly increasing across the world. Today they are the main drivers of morbidity, disability, and mortality in low- and middle income countries (LMICs), and are expected to increase due to unhealthy lifestyles in the wake of ongoing societal changes [1]. Among the major risk factors in many LMICs are poor diet, insufficient physical activity, tobacco and alcohol consumption, and exposure to hazardous substances, e.g. from air pollution. LMICs currently contribute three quarters of the deaths from NCD.

Among the NCD, cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of hospitalization in Nepal [1]. Digitalization and collaboration with the education sector (e.g. community schools) in health promotion interventions could further improve children’s behavior by targeting factors that affect their lifestyle outside the family environment [4]. Hence, the Digital Game Based Learning approach.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dnipro: Університет митної справи та фінансів / Universytet mytnoyi spravy ta finansiv, 2022. p. 5
Keywords
educational game, cardio vascular disease, games for health
National Category
Engineering and Technology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Interaction Technologies
Research subject
GAME Research Group; Research on Citizen Centered Health, University of Skövde (Reacch US)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-21329 (URN)
Conference
II International Scientific and Practical Internet Conference "Innovative Solutions in Economy, Business, Public Communications and International Relationships", April 21, 2022, Dnipro
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2457
Available from: 2022-06-20 Created: 2022-06-20 Last updated: 2023-08-21Bibliographically approved
Thapa, D. R., Oli, N., Vaidya, A., Suominen, S., Ekström-Bergström, A., Areskoug Josefsson, K. & Krettek, A. (2021). Determination and Evaluation of Sense of Coherence in Women in Semi-urban Nepal: A part of the Heart-health Associated Research, Dissemination, and Intervention in the Community (HARDIC) Trial. Kathmandu University Medical Journal, 19(73), 69-75
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Determination and Evaluation of Sense of Coherence in Women in Semi-urban Nepal: A part of the Heart-health Associated Research, Dissemination, and Intervention in the Community (HARDIC) Trial
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2021 (English)In: Kathmandu University Medical Journal, ISSN 1812-2027, E-ISSN 1812-2078, Vol. 19, no 73, p. 69-75Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kathmandu University, 2021
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Family-Centred Health; Research on Citizen Centered Health, University of Skövde (Reacch US)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-19769 (URN)34812161 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85110696122 (Scopus ID)
Note

VOL. 19 | NO. 1 | ISSUE 73 | JAN.-MARCH 2021

Available from: 2021-06-09 Created: 2021-06-09 Last updated: 2022-05-31Bibliographically approved
Josefsson, K. A. & Krettek, A. (2021). Staying True to the Core of Public Health Science in Times of Change. Frontiers In Public Health, 9, 1-4, Article ID 653797.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Staying True to the Core of Public Health Science in Times of Change
2021 (English)In: Frontiers In Public Health, ISSN 2296-2565, Vol. 9, p. 1-4, article id 653797Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2021
Keywords
digital health, methods, public health, scientific core, transdisciplinary
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Research on Citizen Centered Health, University of Skövde (Reacch US)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-19867 (URN)10.3389/fpubh.2021.653797 (DOI)000657639400001 ()34095060 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85107355267 (Scopus ID)
Note

CC BY 4.0

Correspondence: Alexandra Krettek, alexandra.krettek@his.se

Available from: 2021-06-17 Created: 2021-06-17 Last updated: 2021-09-10Bibliographically approved
Thapa, D. R., Ekström-Bergström, A., Krettek, A. & Areskoug-Josefsson, K. (2021). Support and resources to promote and sustain health among nurses and midwives in the workplace: A qualitative study. Nordic journal of nursing research, 41(3), 166-174
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Support and resources to promote and sustain health among nurses and midwives in the workplace: A qualitative study
2021 (English)In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 166-174Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Registered nurses and midwives are in short supply and have among the highest rates of sick leave in the global workforce. The aim of this study was therefore to explore and gain a deeper understanding of how nurses and midwives experience their everyday work, with a view toward promoting and sustaining their work-related health. Nine registered nurses and four registered midwives working in hospitals and community healthcare facilities in Sweden were interviewed. The interviews were analyzed using content analysis. This study is reported in accordance with COREQ. One main category emerged: ‘Quality of organizational and collegial support and opportunities to facilitate recovery, health, and patient care’. From this category, four generic categories describing the overall experiences of registered nurses and midwives could be discerned. Based on these results, it is recommended that employers adopt a systematic health-promotive approach to foster and maintain the workplace health of registered nurses and midwives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2021
Keywords
health promotion, occupational health, organization, stress, support, teamwork
National Category
Nursing Occupational Health and Environmental Health Occupational Therapy
Research subject
Woman, Child and Family (WomFam); Individual and Society VIDSOC
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-19456 (URN)10.1177/2057158520988452 (DOI)2-s2.0-85131317291 (Scopus ID)
Note

CC BY 4.0

First Published February 9, 2021

Available from: 2021-02-10 Created: 2021-02-10 Last updated: 2022-08-31Bibliographically approved
Lindholm, H., Morrison, I., Krettek, A., Malm, D., Novembre, G. & Handlin, L. (2020). Genetic risk-factors for anxiety in healthy individuals: polymorphisms in gene simportant for the HPA axis. BMC Medical Genetics, 21, Article ID 184.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic risk-factors for anxiety in healthy individuals: polymorphisms in gene simportant for the HPA axis
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2020 (English)In: BMC Medical Genetics, E-ISSN 1471-2350, Vol. 21, article id 184Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Two important aspects for the development of anxiety disorders are genetic predisposition and alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. In order to identify genetic risk-factors for anxiety, the aim of this exploratory study was to investigate possible relationships between genetic polymorphisms in genes important for the regulation and activity of the HPA axis and self-assessed anxiety in healthy individuals.

Methods

DNA from 72 healthy participants, 37 women and 35 men, were included in the analyses. Their DNA was extracted and analysed for the following Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP)s: rs41423247 in the NR3C1 gene, rs1360780 in the FKBP5 gene, rs53576 in the OXTR gene, 5-HTTLPR in SLC6A4 gene and rs6295 in the HTR1A gene. Self-assessed anxiety was measured by the State and Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) questionnaire.

Results

Self-assessed measure of both STAI-S and STAI-T were significantly higher in female than in male participants (p = 0.030 and p = 0.036, respectively). For SNP rs41423247 in the NR3C1 gene, there was a significant difference in females in the score for STAI-S, where carriers of the G allele had higher scores compared to the females that were homozygous for the C allele (p < 0.01). For the SNP rs53576 in the OXTR gene, there was a significant difference in males, where carriers of the A allele had higher scores in STAI-T compared to the males that were homozygous for the G allele (p < 0.01).

Conclusion

This study shows that SNP rs41423247 in the NR3C1 gene and SNP rs53576 in the OXTR gene are associated with self-assessed anxiety in healthy individuals in a gender-specific manner. This suggests that these SNP candidates are possible genetic risk-factors for anxiety.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2020
Keywords
Anxiety, Stress, HPA axis, Polymorphism, STAI
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Psychiatry Medical Genetics Neurosciences
Research subject
Translational Medicine TRIM; Individual and Society VIDSOC
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-19078 (URN)10.1186/s12881-020-01123-w (DOI)000574511800002 ()32957930 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85091472288 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilUniversity of Skövde
Note

CC BY 4.0 [artikel], CC0 1.0 [data]

* Correspondence: linda.handlin@his.se

The study was supported by the Swedish Research Council and the School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Sweden. Open access funding provided by University of Skövde.

Available from: 2020-09-22 Created: 2020-09-22 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Projects
An intervention to promote cardiovascular health focusing on mothers – a platform for capacity building through a research link between Sweden and Nepal [2016-05682_VR]; University of SkövdeDigital health promotion in schools – a serious games approach for cardiovascular health education in Nepal [2020-03333_VR]; University of Skövde; Publications
Backlund, P., Bai, H., Bankler, V., Krettek, A., Wilhelmsson, U. & Zhang, R. (2022). Teaching cardiovascular health through a purposeful game. In: Collection of materials: II International Scientific and Practical Internet Conference "Innovative Solutions in Economy, Business, Public Communications and International Relationships", April 21, 2022, Dnipro: Volume 2. Paper presented at II International Scientific and Practical Internet Conference "Innovative Solutions in Economy, Business, Public Communications and International Relationships", April 21, 2022, Dnipro (pp. 391-396). Dnipro: Університет митної справи та фінансів / Universytet mytnoyi spravy ta finansiv, 2
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4583-9315

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