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Theurich, M. A., Davanzo, R., Busck-Rasmussen, M., Díaz-Gómez, N. M., Brennan, C., Kylberg, E., . . . Koletzko, B. (2019). Breastfeeding Rates and Programs in Europe: A Survey of 11 National Breastfeeding Committees and Representatives. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, 68(3), 400-407
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Breastfeeding Rates and Programs in Europe: A Survey of 11 National Breastfeeding Committees and Representatives
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 68, no 3, p. 400-407Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Among the world's regions, the WHO European Region has the lowest rates of exclusive breastfeeding at age 6 months with around 25%. Low rates and early cessation of breastfeeding have important adverse health consequences for women, infants and young children. Protecting, promoting and supporting breastfeeding are a public health priority.

OBJECTIVES: National breastfeeding data and monitoring systems among selected European countries and the WHO European Region are compared. Mechanisms for the support, protection and promotion of breastfeeding are reviewed and successes and challenges in implementation of national programs are presented.

METHODS: National representatives of national breastfeeding committees and initiatives in eleven European countries, including Belgium, Croatia, Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland, participated in a standardized survey. Results are evaluated and compared in a narrative review.

RESULTS: Variation exists in Europe on breastfeeding rates, methodology for data collection and mechanisms for support, protection and promotion of breastfeeding. Directly after birth, between 56 and 98 % of infants in all countries were reported to receive any human milk, and at 6 months 38-71% and 13-39 % of infants to be breastfed or exclusively breastfed, respectively. National plans addressing breastfeeding promotion, protection and support exist in 6 of the 11 countries.

CONCLUSIONS: National governments should commit to evidence-based breastfeeding monitoring and promotion activities, including financial and political support, to improve breastfeeding rates in the Europe. Renewed efforts for collaboration between countries in Europe, including a sustainable platform for information exchange, are needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2019
Keywords
breastfeeding, country comparison, national breastfeeding programs, public health
National Category
Other Basic Medicine Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine Pediatrics Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Woman, Child and Family (WomFam)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-16547 (URN)10.1097/MPG.0000000000002234 (DOI)000461077600029 ()30562307 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85062106403 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-10 Created: 2019-01-10 Last updated: 2019-05-09Bibliographically approved
Abraham, K., Brennan, C., Cattaneo, A., Gomez, M. D., Grguric, J., Solveig, T. H., . . . van Lonkhuijsen, M. (2015). Breastfeeding in Europe: Current Status and Perspectives. Paper presented at 12th European Nutrition Conference (FENS), Berlin, Germany, October 20-23, 2015. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, 67, 15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Breastfeeding in Europe: Current Status and Perspectives
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2015 (English)In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 67, p. 15-Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
S. Karger, 2015
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Woman, Child and Family (WomFam)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-12305 (URN)10.1159/000440895 (DOI)000374988800018 ()2-s2.0-84945151812 (Scopus ID)
Conference
12th European Nutrition Conference (FENS), Berlin, Germany, October 20-23, 2015
Available from: 2016-05-31 Created: 2016-05-30 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Gånedahl, H., Zsaludek Viklund, P., Carlén, K., Kylberg, E. & Ekberg, J. (2015). Work-site wellness programmes in Sweden: a cross-sectional study of physical activity, self-efficacy, and health. Public Health, 129(5), 525-530
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Work-site wellness programmes in Sweden: a cross-sectional study of physical activity, self-efficacy, and health
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2015 (English)In: Public Health, ISSN 0033-3506, E-ISSN 1476-5616, Vol. 129, no 5, p. 525-530Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Sweden, a work-site wellness programme implies reimbursing some of the expenses for health-promoting activities. Although work-site wellness programmes are readily available in Sweden, a large number of employees elect not to participate.

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the association of physical activity, self-reported general health assessment and self-efficacy with participation in a work-site wellness programme.

STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional study design was used.

METHODS: An online questionnaire was distributed to employees of a manufacturing company with 2500 employees in southwest Sweden.

RESULTS: Those who took advantage of the work-site wellness programme assessed their general health as better and had higher assessment of physical activity. The study showed that being enlisted also implies a higher level of physical activity and general health; however, the effect sizes of these correlations were small. Self-efficacy, i.e. perceived behavioural control, was not associated with participation in the work-site wellness programme. However, self-efficacy was correlated with both general health assessment and physical activity. A regression analysis to determine explanatory contributions to the general health assessment score showed no significant contribution from participation in a work-site wellness programme, but was instead explained by perceived behavioural control and physical activity.

CONCLUSIONS: Given the small effect size of the difference in physical activity between participators and non-participators in the work-site wellness programme, it is probable that only a small proportion of participators changed their health-promoting activities as a result of the work-site wellness programme.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Perceived behavioural control, Physical activity, Self-efficacy, Theory of planned behaviour
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Woman, Child and Family (WomFam)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-10850 (URN)10.1016/j.puhe.2015.01.023 (DOI)000355146400015 ()25749670 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84930273121 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-04-22 Created: 2015-04-22 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Kazemi, A., Stark Ekman, D. & Kylberg, E. (2014). Differing attitudes toward health and sickness. In: Linwood H. Cousins (Ed.), Encyclopedia of human services and diversity: (pp. 616-618). Sage Publications
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differing attitudes toward health and sickness
2014 (English)In: Encyclopedia of human services and diversity / [ed] Linwood H. Cousins, Sage Publications, 2014, p. 616-618Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2014
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Social Psychology
Research subject
Woman, Child and Family (WomFam)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-12114 (URN)10.4135/9781483346663 (DOI)9781452287485 (ISBN)9781483346663 (ISBN)
Note

10.4135/9781483346663.n263

Available from: 2016-04-15 Created: 2016-04-08 Last updated: 2019-08-28Bibliographically approved
Stark Ekman, D., Kazemi, A. & Kylberg, E. (2014). Health promotion services. In: Linwood H. Cousins (Ed.), Encyclopedia of human services and diversity: (pp. 632-634). Sage Publications
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health promotion services
2014 (English)In: Encyclopedia of human services and diversity / [ed] Linwood H. Cousins, Sage Publications, 2014, p. 632-634Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2014
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Research subject
Woman, Child and Family (WomFam)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-12126 (URN)10.4135/9781483346663 (DOI)9781452287485 (ISBN)9781483346663 (ISBN)
Note

10.4135/9781483346663.n270

Available from: 2016-04-15 Created: 2016-04-11 Last updated: 2019-08-28Bibliographically approved
Stark Ekman, D., Kazemi, A. & Kylberg, E. (2014). Home and community services. In: Linwood H. Cousins (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Human Services and Diversity: (pp. 651-653). Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Home and community services
2014 (English)In: Encyclopedia of Human Services and Diversity / [ed] Linwood H. Cousins, Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, 2014, p. 651-653Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, 2014
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Research subject
Woman, Child and Family (WomFam)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-12127 (URN)9781452287485 (ISBN)9781483346663 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-04-19 Created: 2016-04-11 Last updated: 2019-08-28Bibliographically approved
Kylberg, E., Stark Ekman, D. & Kazemi, A. (2014). Nutritional services and assessment. In: Linwood H. Cousins (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Human Services and Diversity: (pp. 975-977). Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nutritional services and assessment
2014 (English)In: Encyclopedia of Human Services and Diversity / [ed] Linwood H. Cousins, Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications, 2014, p. 975-977Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications, 2014
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Woman, Child and Family (WomFam)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-12121 (URN)10.4135/9781483346663.n423 (DOI)9781452287485 (ISBN)9781483346663 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-04-08 Created: 2016-04-08 Last updated: 2019-08-28Bibliographically approved
Kazemi, A. & Kylberg, E. (2014). Pilotstudie om psykisk ohälsa och utanförskap bland unga vuxna: Personliga berättelser och reflektioner kring vägar som bär till förändring. Skövde: Skövde Kommun
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pilotstudie om psykisk ohälsa och utanförskap bland unga vuxna: Personliga berättelser och reflektioner kring vägar som bär till förändring
2014 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Skövde: Skövde Kommun, 2014. p. 37
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Social Psychology
Research subject
Woman, Child and Family (WomFam)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-12124 (URN)
Available from: 2016-04-08 Created: 2016-04-08 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Nyqvist, K. H., Häggkvist, A.-P., Hansen, M. N., Kylberg, E., Frandsen, A. L., Maastrup, R., . . . Haiek, L. N. (2013). Expansion of the baby-friendly hospital initiative ten steps to successful breastfeeding into neonatal intensive care: Expert group recommendations. Journal of Human Lactation, 29(3), 300-309
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expansion of the baby-friendly hospital initiative ten steps to successful breastfeeding into neonatal intensive care: Expert group recommendations
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2013 (English)In: Journal of Human Lactation, ISSN 0890-3344, E-ISSN 1552-5732, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 300-309Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the World Health Organization/United Nations Children’s Fund document Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative: Revised, Updated and Expanded for Integrated Care, neonatal care is mentioned as 1 area that would benefit from expansion of the original Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding. The different situations faced by preterm and sick infants and their mothers, compared to healthy infants and their mothers, necessitate a specific breastfeeding policy for neonatal intensive care and require that health care professionals have knowledge and skills in lactation and breastfeeding support, including provision of antenatal information, that are specific to neonatal care. Facilitation of early, continuous, and prolonged skin-to-skin contact (kangaroo mother care), early initiation of breastfeeding, and mothers’ access to breastfeeding support during the infants’ whole hospital stay are important. Mother’s own milk or donor milk (when available) is the optimal nutrition. Efforts should be made to minimize parent–infant separation and facilitate parents’ unrestricted presence with their infants. The initiation and continuation of breastfeeding should be guided only by infant competence and stability, using a semi-demand feeding regimen during the transition to exclusive breastfeeding. Pacifiers are appropriate during tube-feeding, for pain relief, and for calming infants. Nipple shields can be used for facilitating establishment of breastfeeding, but only after qualified support and attempts at the breast. Alternatives to bottles should be used until breastfeeding is well established. The discharge program should include adequate preparation of parents, information about access to lactation and breastfeeding support, both professional and peer support, and a plan for continued follow-up.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2013
Keywords
Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative, breastfeeding, breastfeeding promotion, neonatal intensive care unit, preterm infants
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-8432 (URN)10.1177/0890334413489775 (DOI)000321984400005 ()23727630 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84880351030 (Scopus ID)
Note

Source: Scopus

Available from: 2013-08-20 Created: 2013-08-20 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Ekström, A., Kylberg, E. & Nissen, E. (2012). A process-oriented breastfeeding training program for healthcare professionals to promote breastfeeding: an intervention study. Breastfeeding medicine : the official journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, 7(2), 85-92
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A process-oriented breastfeeding training program for healthcare professionals to promote breastfeeding: an intervention study
2012 (English)In: Breastfeeding medicine : the official journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, ISSN 1556-8342, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 85-92Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of process-oriented training in supportive breastfeeding counseling for midwives and postnatal nurses on the time lapse between the initial breastfeeding session, introduction of breastmilk substitutes and solids, and the duration of breastfeeding. Materials and Methods: Ten municipalities in Sweden were randomized to either the intervention or control groups. The intervention included a process-oriented training program for midwives and postnatal nurses in the intervention municipalities. Primiparas (n=540) living in either an intervention or control municipality were asked to participate in a longitudinal study to evaluate the care given. Data collection for control group A (CGA) (n=162) started before the intervention was initiated. Data for control group B (CGB) (n=172) were collected simultaneously with the intervention group (IG) (n=206). The mothers responded to questionnaires at 3 days, 3 months, and 9 months postpartum. Results: As a result of the process-oriented training program for midwives and postnatal nurses, the IG mothers had a significantly longer duration of exclusive breastfeeding, even if the initial breastfeeding session did not occur within 2 hours after birth, than the corresponding group of CGA mothers (p=0.01). Fewer infants in the IG received breastmilk substitutes (in the first week of life) without medical reasons compared with the control groups (p=0.01). The IG infants were significantly older (3.8 months) when breastmilk substitutes were introduced (after discharge from the hospital) compared with the infants in the control groups (CGA, 2.3 months, p=0.01; CGB, 2.5 months, p=0.03). Conclusion: A process-oriented training program for midwives and postnatal nurses was associated with a reduced number of infants being given breastmilk substitutes during the 1st week without medical reasons and delayed the introduction of breastmilk substitutes after discharge from the hospital.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mary Ann Liebert, 2012
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-5772 (URN)10.1089/bfm.2010.0084 (DOI)000302777000004 ()22168946 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84859623172 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-04-25 Created: 2012-04-25 Last updated: 2018-05-03Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3276-756X

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