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Harlén, Mikael
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Publications (10 of 11) Show all publications
Muller, J., Ekström, A., Harlén, M., Lindmark, U. & Handlin, L. (2016). Mechanical massage and mental training program effect employees' heart rate, blood pressure and fingertip temperature: An exploratory pilot study. European Journal of Integrative Medicine, 8(5), 762-768
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mechanical massage and mental training program effect employees' heart rate, blood pressure and fingertip temperature: An exploratory pilot study
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2016 (English)In: European Journal of Integrative Medicine, ISSN 1876-3820, E-ISSN 1876-3839, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 762-768Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Inability to relax and recover is suggested to be a key factor for stress-related health problems. This study aimed to investigate possible effects of mechanical massage and mental training, used either separately or in combination during working hours. Methods: Employees were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: i) Mechanical massage combined with mental training (n = 19), ii) Mechanical massage (n = 19), iii) Mental training (n = 19), iv) Pause (n = 19), v) Control (n = 17). The study lasted for eight weeks. Heart rate, blood pressure and fingertip temperature were measured at start, after four and after eight weeks. Results: Between-group analysis showed that heart rate differed significantly between the groups after 4 weeks (p = 0.020) and tended to differ after eight weeks (p = 0.072), with lowest levels displayed in the massage group and the control group. Blood pressure and fingertip temperature did not differ between the groups. Within-group analysis showed that mechanical massage decreased heart rate (p = 0.038) and blood pressure (systolic p = 0.019, diastolic p = 0.026) and increased fingertip temperature (p = 0.035). Mental training programs reduced heart rate (p = 0.036). Combining the two methods increased diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.028) and decreased fingertip temperature (p = 0.031). The control group had a significant decrease in systolic blood pressure during the first four weeks of the study (p = 0.038) Conclusion: Receiving mechanical massage and listening to mental training programs, either separately or in combination, during working hours had some positive effects on the employees’ heart rate, blood pressure and fingertip temperature. The effects were especially strong for employees who received mechanical massage only.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Heart rate, Blood pressure, Temperature, massage, Work Place, Stress
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Medical sciences; Woman, Child and Family (WomFam); Physics and Mathematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-12533 (URN)10.1016/j.eujim.2016.06.002 (DOI)000396402200024 ()2-s2.0-84977489680 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Effekt av massagefåtölj med avslappningsprogram på stress reduktion och hälsa- en randomiserad kontrollerad studie
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20110142
Available from: 2016-06-20 Created: 2016-06-20 Last updated: 2018-11-15Bibliographically approved
Muller, J., Handlin, L., Harlén, M., Lindmark, U. & Ekström, A. (2016). The value of armchairs in providing mechanical massage and mental relaxation programmes is not established for workplace health promotion [Letter to the editor]. Focus on Alternative and Complementary Therapies, 21(1), 44-45
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The value of armchairs in providing mechanical massage and mental relaxation programmes is not established for workplace health promotion
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2016 (English)In: Focus on Alternative and Complementary Therapies, ISSN 1465-3753, E-ISSN 2042-7166, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 44-45Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2016
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Medical sciences; Physics and Mathematics; Woman, Child and Family (WomFam)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-12530 (URN)10.1111/fct.12222 (DOI)2-s2.0-84990241897 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Effekt av massagefåtölj med avslappningsprogram på stressreduktion och hälsa- en randomiserad kontrollerad studie
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20110142
Note

Authors' reply på kommentar av WM London gällande artikeln: Muller, J., Handlin, L., Harlén, M., Lindmark, U. & Ekström, A. (2015). Mechanical massage and mental training programmes affect employees' anxiety, stress susceptibility and detachment – a randomised explorative pilot study. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 15(1), Article ID 302.

Available from: 2016-06-20 Created: 2016-06-20 Last updated: 2018-11-15Bibliographically approved
Muller, J., Handlin, L., Harlén, M., Lindmark, U. & Ekström, A. (2015). Mechanical massage and mental training programmes affect employees´ anxiety, stress susceptibility and detachment – a randomised explorative pilot study. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 15(1), Article ID 302.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mechanical massage and mental training programmes affect employees´ anxiety, stress susceptibility and detachment – a randomised explorative pilot study
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2015 (English)In: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1472-6882, E-ISSN 1472-6882, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 302Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Working people's reduced ability to recover has been proposed as a key factor behind the increase in stress-related health problems. One not yet evidence-based preventive method designed to help employees keep healthy and be less stressed is an armchair with built-in mechanical massage and mental training programmes, This study aimed to evaluate possible effects on employees' experience of levels of "Anxiety", "Stress Susceptibility", "Detachment" and "Social Desirability" when using mechanical massage and mental training programmes, both separately and in combination, during working hours.

METHODS:

Employees from four different workplaces were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: i) Massage and mental training (sitting in the armchair and receiving mechanical massage while listening to the mental training programmes, n=19), ii) Massage (sitting in the armchair and receiving mechanical massage only, n=19), iii) Mental training (sitting in the armchair and listening to the mental training programmes only, n=19), iv) Pause (sitting in the armchair but not receiving mechanical massage or listening to the mental training programmes, n=19), v) Control (not sitting in the armchair at all, n=17). In order to discover how the employees felt about their own health they were asked to respond to statements from the "Swedish Scale of Personality" (SSP), immediately before the randomisation, after four weeks and after eight weeks (end-of-study).

RESULTS:

There were no significant differences between the five study groups for any of the traits studied ("Somatic Trait Anxiety", "Psychic Trait Anxiety", "Stress Susceptibility", "Detachment" and "Social Desirability") at any of the occasions. However, the massage group showed a significant decrease in the subscale "Somatic Trait Anxiety" (p=0.032), during the entire study period. Significant decreases in the same subscale were also observed in the pause group between start and week eight (p=0.040) as well as between week four and week eight (p=0.049) and also in the control group between the second and third data collection (p=0.014). The massage and mental training group showed a significant decrease in "Stress Susceptibility" between week four and week eight (p=0.022). The pause group showed a significant increase in the subscale "Detachment" (p=0.044).

CONCLUSIONS:

There were no significant differences between the five study groups for any of the traits studied. However, when looking at each individual group separately, positive effects in their levels of "Anxiety", "Stress Susceptibility" and "Detachment" could be seen. Although the results from this pilot study indicate some positive effects, mechanical chair massage and mental training programmes used in order to increase employee's ability to recover, needs to be evaluated further as tools to increase the employees ability to recover.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2015
Keywords
Stress, Anxiety, Alternative, Complementary, Intervention, Physical Health, Psychosocial health, Working place
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-11478 (URN)10.1186/s12906-015-0753-x (DOI)000360342400003 ()26329694 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84940492981 (Scopus ID)
Projects
EFFECT OF ARMCHAIR WITH MASSAGE AND RELAXATION PROGRAM ON RECOVERY AND HEALTH PROMOTION -A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED STUDY
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20110142
Available from: 2015-09-02 Created: 2015-09-02 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Fagerlind, M. G., Webb, J. S., Barraud, N., McDougald, D., Jansson, A., Nilsson, P., . . . Rice, S. A. (2012). Dynamic modelling of cell death during biofilm development. Journal of Theoretical Biology, 295, 23-36
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dynamic modelling of cell death during biofilm development
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2012 (English)In: Journal of Theoretical Biology, ISSN 0022-5193, E-ISSN 1095-8541, Vol. 295, p. 23-36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Biofilms are currently recognised as the predominant bacterial life-style and it has been suggested that biofilm development is influenced by a number of different processes such as adhesion, detachment, mass transport, quorum sensing, cell death and active dispersal. One of the least understood processes and its effects on biofilm development is cell death. However, experimental studies suggest that bacterial death is an important process during biofilm development and many studies show a relationship between cell death and dispersal in microbial biofilms. We present a model of the process of cell death during biofilm development, with a particular focus on the spatial localisation of cell death or cell damage. Three rules governing cell death or cell damage were evaluated which compared the effects of starvation, damage accumulation, and viability during biofilm development and were also used to design laboratory based experiments to test the model. Results from model simulations show that actively growing biofilms develop steep nutrient gradients within the interior of the biofilm that affect neighbouring microcolonies resulting in cell death and detachment. Two of the rules indicated that high substrate concentrations lead to accelerated cell death, in contrast to the third rule, based on the accumulation of damage, which predicted earlier cell death for biofilms grown with low substrate concentrations. Comparison of the modelling results with experimental results suggests that cell death is favoured under low nutrient conditions and that the accumulation of damage may be the main cause of cell death during biofilm development. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Press, 2012
Keywords
Biofilm, Individual based CA, Cell death
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Natural sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-5452 (URN)10.1016/j.jtbi.2011.10.007 (DOI)000299408500003 ()2-s2.0-82255169356 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-02-23 Created: 2012-02-22 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Sögård, P., Harlén, M., Long, Y. C., Szekeres, F., Barnes, B. R., Chibalin, A. V. & Zierath, J. R. (2010). Validation of the in vitro incubation of extensor digitorum longus muscle from mice with a mathematical model. Journal of biological systems, 18(3), 687-707
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validation of the in vitro incubation of extensor digitorum longus muscle from mice with a mathematical model
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2010 (English)In: Journal of biological systems, ISSN 0218-3390, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 687-707Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In vitro incubation of tissues; in particular, skeletal muscles from rodents, is a widely-used experimental method in diabetes research. This experimental method has previously been validated, both experimentally and theoretically. However, much of the method's experimental data remains unclear, including the high-rate of lactate production and the lack of an observable increase in glycogen content, within a given time. The predominant hypothesis explaining the high-rate of lactate production is that this phenomenon is dependent on a mechanism in glycolysis that works as a safety valve, producing lactate when glucose uptake is super-physiological. Another hypothesis is that existing anoxia forces more ATP to be produced from glycolysis, leading to an increased lactate concentration. The lack of an observable increase in glycogen content is assumed to be dependent on limitations in sensitivity of the measuring method used. We derived a mathematical model to investigate which of these hypotheses is most likely to be correct. Using our model, data analysis indicates that the in vitro incubated muscle specimens, most likely are sensing the presence of existing anoxia, rather than an overflow in glycolysis. The anoxic milieu causes the high lactate production. The model also predicts an increased glycogenolysis. After mathematical analyses, an estimation of the glycogen concentration could be made with a reduced model. In conclusion, central anoxia is likely to cause spatial differences in glycogen concentrations throughout the entire muscle. Thus, data regarding total glycogen levels in the incubated muscle do not accurately represent the entire organ. The presented model allows for an estimation of total glycogen, despite spatial differences present in the muscle specimen.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
World Scientific, 2010
Keywords
Average, Glycogen, In Vitro, Incubation, Skeletal Muscle
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Natural sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-4529 (URN)10.1142/S0218339010003494 (DOI)000283629300008 ()2-s2.0-77957358811 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-01-04 Created: 2011-01-04 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Sögaard, P., Szekeres, F., Holmström, M., Larsson, D., Harlén, M., Garcia-Roves, P. & Chibalin, A. V. (2009). Effects of fibre type and diffusion distance on mouse skeletal muscle glycogen content in vitro. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, 107(6), 1189-1197
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of fibre type and diffusion distance on mouse skeletal muscle glycogen content in vitro
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2009 (English)In: Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, ISSN 0730-2312, E-ISSN 1097-4644, Vol. 107, no 6, p. 1189-1197Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In vitro incubation of isolated rodent skeletal muscle is a widely used procedure in metabolic research. One concern with this method is the development of an anoxic state during the incubation period that can cause muscle glycogen depletion. Our aim was to investigate whether in vitro incubation conditions influence glycogen concentration in glycolytic extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and oxidative soleus mouse muscle. Quantitative immunohistochemistry was applied to assess glycogen content in incubated skeletal muscle. Glycogen concentration was depleted, independent of insulin-stimulation in the incubated skeletal muscle. The extent of glycogen depletion was correlated with the oxidative fibre distribution and with the induction of hypoxia-induced-factor-1-alpha. Insulin exposure partially prevented glycogen depletion in soleus, but not in EDL muscle, providing evidence that glucose diffusion is not a limiting step to maintain glycogen content. Our results provide evidence to suggest that the anoxic milieu and the intrinsic characteristics of the skeletal muscle fibre type play a major role in inducing glycogen depletion in during in vitro incubations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2009
Keywords
immunohistochemistry, muscle glycogen, fibre type, insulin action, anoxia
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Natural sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-3291 (URN)10.1002/jcb.22223 (DOI)000268826900016 ()19507232 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-68049113343 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2009-07-09 Created: 2009-07-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Jansson, A., Harlén, M., Karlsson, S., Nilsson, P. & Cooley, M. (2007). 3D computation modelling of the influence of cytokine secretion on Th-cell development suggests that negative selection (inhibition of Th1 cells) is more effective than positive selection by IL-4 for Th2 cell dominance. Immunology and Cell Biology, 85(3), 189-196
Open this publication in new window or tab >>3D computation modelling of the influence of cytokine secretion on Th-cell development suggests that negative selection (inhibition of Th1 cells) is more effective than positive selection by IL-4 for Th2 cell dominance
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2007 (English)In: Immunology and Cell Biology, ISSN 0818-9641, E-ISSN 1440-1711, Vol. 85, no 3, p. 189-196Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Th-cell development has been suggested to include selective mechanisms in which certain cytokines select either Th1 or Th2 cells to proliferate and grow. The selective theory is based on the observation that Th2 cells secrete IL-4, a cytokine that promotes Th2 development, whereas Th1 cells secrete interferon-gamma (IFN-italic gamma) that favours Th1 development, and both positive and negative selective influences have been suggested to operate. In this study, we investigate the role of autocrine secretion and utilization of IL-4 by Th2 cells and address the question of whether an activated Th2 cell can be positively selected by IL-4 secreted from other Th2 cells. We present a spatial three dimensional (3D) modelling approach to simulate the interaction between the IL-4 ligand and its IL-4 receptors expressed on discrete IL-4 secreting cells. The simulations, based on existing experimental data on the IL-4 receptor–ligand system, illustrate how Th-cell development is highly dependent on the distance between cells that are communicating. The model suggests that a single Th2 cell is likely to communicate with possible target cells within a range of approximately 100 mum and that an activated Th2 cell manages to fill most of its own IL-4 receptors, even at a low secretion rate. The predictions made by the model suggest that negative selection against Th1 cells is more effective than positive selection by IL-4 for promoting Th2 dominance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2007
Keywords
simulation, IL-4, diffusion, differentiation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-2034 (URN)10.1038/sj.icb.7100023 (DOI)000246427900005 ()17199110 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-34247868910 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2008-05-07 Created: 2008-05-07 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Jansson, A., Barnes, E., Klenerman, P., Harlén, M., Sørensen, P., Davis, S. J. & Nilsson, P. (2005). A Theoretical Framework for Quantitative Analysis of the Molecular Basis of Costimulation. Journal of Immunology, 175(3), 1575-1585
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Theoretical Framework for Quantitative Analysis of the Molecular Basis of Costimulation
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2005 (English)In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 175, no 3, p. 1575-1585Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We present a theoretical framework for simulating the synaptic accumulation of the costimulatory molecules CD28, CTLA-4, B7-1, and B7-2, based on a system of mean-field, ordinary differential equations, and rigorous biophysical and expression data. The simulations show that binding affinity, stoichiometric properties, expression levels, and, in particular, competition effects all profoundly influence complex formation at cellular interfaces. B7-2 engages 33-fold more CD28 than CTLA-4 at the synapse in contrast to B7-1, which ligates ~7-fold more CTLA-4 than CD28. Although B7-1 completely dominates interactions with CTLA-4, forming linear arrays of 7-18 receptor-ligand pairs, CTLA-4 is fully engaged by B7-2 when B7-1 is absent. Additional simulations reveal the sensitivity of CD28 interactions to modeled transport processes. The results support the concept that B7-2 and B7-1 are the dominant ligands of CD28 and CTLA-4, respectively, and indicate that the inability of B7-2 to recruit CTLA-4 to the synapse cannot be due to the differential binding properties of B7-1 and B7-2 only. We discuss the apparent redundancy of B7-1 in the context of a potentially dynamic synaptic microenvironment, and in light of functions other than the direct enhancement of T cell inhibition by CTLA-4.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Association of Immunologists, 2005
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Natural sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-1627 (URN)000233648000027 ()16034096 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-22544465538 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2007-08-03 Created: 2007-08-03 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Sögård, P., Harlén, M., Svensson, L. T., Zierath, J. R. & Nilsson, P. (2005). Integration of mathematical and experimental approaches to resolve insulin signaling [Letter to the editor]. Acta Physiologica Scandinavica, 183(1), 125-126
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integration of mathematical and experimental approaches to resolve insulin signaling
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2005 (English)In: Acta Physiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6772, E-ISSN 1365-201X, Vol. 183, no 1, p. 125-126Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2005
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-1628 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-201X.2004.01409.x (DOI)000226437500012 ()15654926 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-13244257055 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2007-08-03 Created: 2007-08-03 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Fagerlind, M., Nilsson, P., Harlén, M., Karlsson, S., Rice, S. A. & Kjelleberg, S. (2005). Modeling the effect of acylated homoserine lactone antagonists in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Biosystems (Amsterdam. Print), 80(2), 201-213
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modeling the effect of acylated homoserine lactone antagonists in Pseudomonas aeruginosa
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2005 (English)In: Biosystems (Amsterdam. Print), ISSN 0303-2647, E-ISSN 1872-8324, Vol. 80, no 2, p. 201-213Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative bacterium that causes serious illnesses, particularly in immunocompromised individuals, often with a fatal outcome. The finding that the acylated homoserine lactone quorum sensing (QS) system controls the production of virulence factors in P. aeruginosa makes this system a possible target for antimicrobial therapy. It has been suggested that an N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-homoserine lactone (3O-C12-HSL) antagonist, a QS blocker (QSB), would interfere efficiently with the quorum sensing system in P. aeruginosa and thus reduce the virulence of this pathogen. In this work, a mathematical model of the QS system in P. aeruginosa has been developed. The model was used to virtually add 3O-C12-HSL antagonists that differed in their affinity for the receptor protein and for their ability to mediate degradation of the receptor. The model suggests that very small differences in these parameters for different 3O-C12-HSL antagonists can greatly affect the success of QSB based inhibition of the QS system in P. aeruginosa. Most importantly, it is proposed that the ability of the 3O-C12-HSL antagonist to mediate degradation of LasR is the core parameter for successful QSB based inhibition of the QS system in P. aeruginosa. Finally, this study demonstrates that QSBs can shift the system to a low steady state, corresponding to an uninduced state and thus, suggests that the use of 3O-C12-HSL antagonists may constitute a promising therapeutic approach against P. aeruginosa involved infections.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2005
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-1573 (URN)10.1016/j.biosystems.2004.11.008 (DOI)000228697100010 ()15823419 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-17044367383 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2007-07-23 Created: 2007-07-23 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
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