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Hammarlund, Kina
Publications (10 of 22) Show all publications
Hammarlund, K., Sjunnesson, S., Tettenborn, N., Jomeen, J. & Thorstensson, S. (2017). ‘I had a lump in my stomach’: Swedish gay and lesbian students’ experiences of their time in school. British Journal of School Nursing, 12(6), 284-290
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘I had a lump in my stomach’: Swedish gay and lesbian students’ experiences of their time in school
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2017 (English)In: British Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1752-2803, E-ISSN 2052-2827, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 284-290Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Gay and lesbian youth can experience ignorance and a lack of acknowledgement surrounding their sexual orientation during their time in school. This qualitative interview study describes how Swedish gay and lesbian students experience their secondary school years on the basis that society has heteronormative values.

The data is based on eight telephone interviews with gay and lesbian young adults, aged 18–25 and was analysed using a qualitative narrative approach.

The findings presented four themes: not fitting into the norm of heterosexuality, lacking confirmation of their own homosexuality, finding courage, seeing the school as a supportive or a non-supportive environment.

A way to normalise homosexuality can be to discuss sexual development and attraction from a health-promoting perspective. Professionals working in school need to feel comfortable with issues such as sexuality in order to create a situation of confidence for the student.

Keywords
Homosexuality, Gay, Lesbian, Adolescence, School, experience
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Woman, Child and Family (WomFam)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14052 (URN)10.12968/bjsn.2017.12.6.284 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-08-29 Created: 2017-08-29 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Henoch, I., Melin-Johansson, C., Bergh, I., Strang, S., Ek, K., Hammarlund, K., . . . Browall, M. (2017). Undergraduate nursing students' attitudes and preparedness toward caring for dying persons: A longitudinal study. Nurse Education in Practice, 26, 12-20, Article ID S1471-5953(17)30384-0.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Undergraduate nursing students' attitudes and preparedness toward caring for dying persons: A longitudinal study
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2017 (English)In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 26, p. 12-20, article id S1471-5953(17)30384-0Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Nursing education needs to prepare students for care of dying patients. The aim of this study was to describe the development of nursing students' attitudes toward caring for dying patients and their perceived preparedness to perform end-of-life care. A longitudinal study was performed with 117 nursing students at six universities in Sweden. The students completed the Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD) questionnaire at the beginning of first and second year, and at the end of third year of education. After education, the students completed questions about how prepared they felt by to perform end-of-life care. The total FATCOD increased from 126 to 132 during education. Five weeks' theoretical palliative care education significantly predicted positive changes in attitudes toward caring for dying patients. Students with five weeks' theoretical palliative care training felt more prepared and supported by the education to care for a dying patient than students with shorter education. A minority felt prepared to take care of a dead body or meet relatives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Attitudes, FATCOD, Longitudinal, Nurse education, Palliative care education
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Wellbeing in long-term health problems (WeLHP)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14026 (URN)10.1016/j.nepr.2017.06.007 (DOI)000412249800004 ()28648955 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85021136719 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-23 Created: 2017-08-23 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Hagelin, C. L., Melin-Johansson, C., Henoch, I., Bergh, I., Ek, K., Hammarlund, K., . . . Browall, M. (2016). Factors influencing attitude toward care of dying patients in first-year nursing students. International Journal of Palliative Nursing, 22(1), 28-36
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors influencing attitude toward care of dying patients in first-year nursing students
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2016 (English)In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 28-36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: To describe Swedish first-year undergraduate nursing students' attitudes toward care of dying patients. Possible influences such as age, earlier care experiences, care education, experiences of meeting dying patients and place of birth were investigated.

METHOD: The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD) was used in six universities. Descriptive statistics and regression analysis were used.

RESULTS: Some 371 students (67.3%) reported overall positive attitude toward caring for dying patients (total mean FATCOD 119.5, SD 10.6) early in their first semester. Older students, students with both earlier care experience and earlier education, those with experience of meeting a dying person, and students born in Sweden reported the highest scores, a more positive attitude.

CONCLUSION: Age, earlier care experience and education, experiences of meeting a dying person and place of birth seems to affect students' attitudes toward care of the dying and need to be considered among nursing educators.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-12098 (URN)10.12968/ijpn.2016.22.1.28 (DOI)000389316300006 ()26804954 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84960500345 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-04-05 Created: 2016-04-05 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Björk, M., Sundler, A. J., Hallström, I. & Hammarlund, K. (2016). Like being covered in a wet and dark blanket: Parents' lived experiences of losing a child to cancer. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 25, 40-45
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Like being covered in a wet and dark blanket: Parents' lived experiences of losing a child to cancer
2016 (English)In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 25, p. 40-45Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The aim of this study was to illuminate parents' lived experiences of losing a child to cancer. Method: Interviews and a narrative about parents' experiences of losing a child to cancer were gathered from six parents of children whom had participated in a longitudinal study across the child's illness trajectory. The analysis of the data was inspired by van Manen's hermeneutic phenomenological approach. Results: One essential theme emerged: Like being covered in a wet and dark blanket, as well as six related themes: Feeling conflicting emotions, Preparing for the moment of death, Continuing parenting after death, Recollecting and sharing memories, Working through the sorrow and New perspectives in life. Conclusion: There is a need for good palliative care. If not, there is a risk that the parent will perseverate and blame themselves for not being a good parent during the suffering child's last time in life. Meetings with the parents six months and two years after the child's death might facilitate healing through the grief process. 

Keywords
Parents, Paediatric cancer, Palliative care, Death, Lived experience, Nursing
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-13269 (URN)10.1016/j.ejon.2016.08.007 (DOI)000389172500006 ()27865251 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84988644276 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-29 Created: 2016-12-29 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Österlind, J., Prahl, C., Westin, L., Strang, S., Bergh, I., Henoch, I., . . . Ek, K. (2016). Nursing students' perceptions of caring for dying people, after one year in nursing school. Nurse Education Today, 41, 12-16
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nursing students' perceptions of caring for dying people, after one year in nursing school
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2016 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 41, p. 12-16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To describe Swedish nursing students' perceptions of caring for dying people after the first year of a three year in a nursing programme at three university nursing schools in Sweden. Methods: Interviews (n = 17) were undertaken with nursing students at the end of their first year. A phenomenographic approach was used to design and structure the analysis of the nursing students' perceptions. Results: The analysis resulted in five categories: 1) from abstract to reality, 2) from scary to natural, 3) increased knowledge can give bad conscience, 4) time limits versus fear of end-of-life conversations, and 5) meeting with relatives. Conclusion: Nursing students need to be prepared both theoretically and within practice to encounter death and dying and to care for dying persons. By combining their theoretical knowledge of dying and death with their own encounters of death and dying people in practice, the students can be supported to develop an understanding of dying and death as a natural part of life rather than something frightening. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Death, Dying, End-of-life care, Nursing education, Nursing students, Perceptions
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-12569 (URN)10.1016/j.nedt.2016.03.016 (DOI)000376705500003 ()27138476 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84962339581 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-06-22 Created: 2016-06-22 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Hammarlund, K., Falck, J., Lind, J. & Thorstensson, S. (2015). Meeting and supporting students who have parents with mental ill-health. British Journal of School Nursing, 10(4), 182-187
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Meeting and supporting students who have parents with mental ill-health
2015 (English)In: British Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1752-2803, E-ISSN 2052-2827, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 182-187Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mental ill-health is an increasing problem in Swedish society. If a parent is suffering from mental illness, it can have negative consequences for the child’s wellbeing, health and developmental process. The challenge for school nurses is to identify and support these students. The aim of this study is to describe school nurses’ experiences from meeting and supporting students who have parents with mental ill-health. Interviews with six school nurses were performed after snowball recruitment with purposive sampling and analysed using qualitative content analysis. School nurses’ experience of meeting and supporting students who have parents with mental ill-health shows that this is complex and demands competence and collaboration. Their competences in collaboration with others as well as their ability to show an open and tolerant attitude were important in order to build trustful relations with students, their parents and other professionals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MA Healthcare Ltd, 2015
Keywords
school nurse, experience, student, parental mental ill-health
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-10883 (URN)10.12968/bjsn.2015.10.4.182 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-05-04 Created: 2015-05-04 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Hammarlund, K., Andersson, E., Tenenbaum, H. & Sundler, A. J. (2015). We are also interested in how fathers feel: a qualitative exploration of child health center nurses' recognition of postnatal depression in fathers. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 15, Article ID 290.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>We are also interested in how fathers feel: a qualitative exploration of child health center nurses' recognition of postnatal depression in fathers
2015 (English)In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 15, article id 290Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: To become a parent is an emotionally life-changing experience. Paternal depression during the postnatal period has been associated with emotional and behavioral problems in children. The condition has predominantly been related to mothers, and the recognition of paternal postnatal depression (PND) has been paid less attention to. PND in fathers may be difficult to detect. However, nurses in pediatric services meet a lot of fathers and are in a position to detect a father who is suffering from PND. Therefore, the aim of this study was (a) to explore Child Health Center nurses' experiences of observing depression in fathers during the postnatal period; and (b) to explore hindrances of observing these fathers.

METHODS: A qualitative descriptive study was conducted. Ten nurses were interviewed in 2014. A thematic data analysis was performed and data were analyzed for meaning.

RESULTS: Paternal PND was experienced as being vague and difficult to detect. Experiences of fathers with such problems were limited, and it was hard to grasp the health status of the fathers, something which was further complicated when routines were lacking or when gender attitudes influenced the daily work of the nurses.

CONCLUSION: This study contributes to an increased awareness of hindrances to the recognition of PND in fathers. The importance to detect all signals of paternal health status in fathers suffering from PND needs to be acknowledged. Overall, more attention needs to be paid to PND in fathers where a part of the solution for this is that they are screened just like the mothers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2015
Keywords
Father, Interview, Depression, Nursing, Qualitative
National Category
Health Sciences Nursing Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-11850 (URN)10.1186/s12884-015-0726-6 (DOI)000364548300001 ()26552601 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84947037853 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-01-25 Created: 2016-01-25 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Ek, K., Westin, L., Prahl, C., Österlind, J., Strang, S., Bergh, I., . . . Hammarlund, K. (2014). Death and caring for dying patients: exploring first-year nursing students' descriptive experiences. International Journal of Palliative Nursing, 20(10), 509-515
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Death and caring for dying patients: exploring first-year nursing students' descriptive experiences
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2014 (English)In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 20, no 10, p. 509-515Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To describe first-year nursing student`s expereinces of witnessing death and providing end-of-life care. Methods: This study is a part of a larger longitudial prject. Interviews (n=17) were conducted with nursing students at the end of their fisrt year of education. To analyse the interviews (lived-expereince description), a thematic analysis, "a search for meaning" (Van Manen, 1997) was applied. Result: The results are presented within the framework of four separate themes: (1) The thought of death is more frightening than the actual epereince, (2) Daring to approach the dying patient and offering something of oneself, (3) The expereince of not sufficing in the face of death and (4) being confronted with one`s own feelings. Conclusion: Nursing students require continous support and opportunity to reflect and discuss their experiences about caring for dying patients and confronting death throughout the entirety of their education. In addition, teachers and clinical superviosors need t give support using reflective practice to help students to devlo confidence in their capacity for caring dying patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mark Allen Group, 2014
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-10176 (URN)10.12968/ijpn.2014.20.10.509 (DOI)25350217 (PubMedID)
Projects
Sjuksköterskestudenters erfarenheter av och attityder till att vårda döende personer som grund för utveckling av undervisning i pallaitiv vård
Available from: 2014-11-18 Created: 2014-11-10 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Strang, S., Bergh, I., Ek, K., Hammarlund, K., Prahl, C., Westin, L., . . . Henoch, I. (2014). Swedish nursing students' reasoning about emotionally demanding issues in caring for dying patients. International Journal of Palliative Nursing, 20(4), 194-200
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish nursing students' reasoning about emotionally demanding issues in caring for dying patients
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2014 (English)In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 194-200Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: To describe nursing students' reasoning about emotionally demanding questions concerning the care of dying patients.

METHODS: The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD) Scale was completed by students at the beginning of their education, and there was great variation in the responses to five items. At a follow-up measurement in the second year, an open-ended question, 'How did you reason when completing this question?', was added to each of the these five items. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the responses.

RESULTS: Of 140 students who completed the FATCOD, 111 provided free-text responses. The analysis of these responses revealed three themes: death perceptions, the students' understanding of their current situation, and the nurse's responsibility.

CONCLUSION: This study provides useful information on students' reasoning about emotionally demanding questions relating to the care of dying patients. Such knowledge is valuable in helping students to overcome their fear and fulfil their expectations concerning their future proficiency.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mark Allen Group, 2014
Keywords
Death, End-of-life care, Nursing education, Nursing students, Perceptions
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-9496 (URN)10.12968/ijpn.2014.20.4.194 (DOI)24763328 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84902116098 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-06-17 Created: 2014-06-17 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Henoch, I., Browall, M., Melin-Johansson, C., Danielson, E., Udo, C., Johansson Sundler, A., . . . Strang, S. (2014). The Swedish version of the Frommelt attitude toward care of the dying scale: Aspects of validity and factors influencing nurses' and nursing students' attitudes. Cancer Nursing, 37(1), E1-E11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Swedish version of the Frommelt attitude toward care of the dying scale: Aspects of validity and factors influencing nurses' and nursing students' attitudes
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2014 (English)In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 37, no 1, p. E1-E11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Nurses' attitudes toward caring for dying persons need to be explored. The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD) scale has not previously been used in Swedish language. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to compare FATCOD scores among Swedish nurses and nursing students with those from other languages, to explore the existence of 2 subscales, and to evaluate influences of experiences on attitudes toward care of dying patients. METHODS: A descriptive, cross-sectional, and predictive design was used. The FATCOD scores of Swedish nurses from hospice, oncology, surgery clinics, and palliative home care and nursing students were compared with published scores from the United States, Israel, and Japan. Descriptive statistics, t tests, and factor and regression analyses were used. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 213 persons: 71 registered nurses, 42 enrolled nurses, and 100 nursing students. Swedish FATCOD mean scores did not differ from published means from the United States and Israel, but were significantly more positive than Japanese means. In line with Japanese studies, factor analyses yielded a 2-factor solution. Total FATCOD and subscales had low Cronbach α's. Hospice and palliative team nurses were more positive than oncology and surgery nurses to care for dying patients. CONCLUSIONS: Although our results suggest that the Swedish FATCOD may comprise 2 distinct scales, the total scale may be the most adequate and applicable for use in Sweden. Professional experience was associated with nurses' attitudes toward caring for dying patients. IMPLICATION FOR PRACTICE: Care culture might influence nurses' attitudes toward caring for dying patients; the benefits of education need to be explored.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2014
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-8405 (URN)10.1097/NCC.0b013e318279106b (DOI)000328936200001 ()23357885 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84890555647 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-08-14 Created: 2013-08-14 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
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