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Henoch, I., Melin-Johansson, C., Bergh, I., Strang, S., Ek, K., Hammarlund, K., . . . Browall, M. (2017). Undergraduate nursing students' attitudes and preparedness toward caring for dying persons: A longitudinal study. Nurse Education in Practice, 26, 12-20, Article ID S1471-5953(17)30384-0.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Undergraduate nursing students' attitudes and preparedness toward caring for dying persons: A longitudinal study
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2017 (English)In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 26, p. 12-20, article id S1471-5953(17)30384-0Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Nursing education needs to prepare students for care of dying patients. The aim of this study was to describe the development of nursing students' attitudes toward caring for dying patients and their perceived preparedness to perform end-of-life care. A longitudinal study was performed with 117 nursing students at six universities in Sweden. The students completed the Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD) questionnaire at the beginning of first and second year, and at the end of third year of education. After education, the students completed questions about how prepared they felt by to perform end-of-life care. The total FATCOD increased from 126 to 132 during education. Five weeks' theoretical palliative care education significantly predicted positive changes in attitudes toward caring for dying patients. Students with five weeks' theoretical palliative care training felt more prepared and supported by the education to care for a dying patient than students with shorter education. A minority felt prepared to take care of a dead body or meet relatives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Attitudes, FATCOD, Longitudinal, Nurse education, Palliative care education
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Wellbeing in long-term health problems (WeLHP)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14026 (URN)10.1016/j.nepr.2017.06.007 (DOI)000412249800004 ()28648955 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85021136719 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-23 Created: 2017-08-23 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Hagelin, C. L., Melin-Johansson, C., Henoch, I., Bergh, I., Ek, K., Hammarlund, K., . . . Browall, M. (2016). Factors influencing attitude toward care of dying patients in first-year nursing students. International Journal of Palliative Nursing, 22(1), 28-36
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors influencing attitude toward care of dying patients in first-year nursing students
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2016 (English)In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 28-36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: To describe Swedish first-year undergraduate nursing students' attitudes toward care of dying patients. Possible influences such as age, earlier care experiences, care education, experiences of meeting dying patients and place of birth were investigated.

METHOD: The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD) was used in six universities. Descriptive statistics and regression analysis were used.

RESULTS: Some 371 students (67.3%) reported overall positive attitude toward caring for dying patients (total mean FATCOD 119.5, SD 10.6) early in their first semester. Older students, students with both earlier care experience and earlier education, those with experience of meeting a dying person, and students born in Sweden reported the highest scores, a more positive attitude.

CONCLUSION: Age, earlier care experience and education, experiences of meeting a dying person and place of birth seems to affect students' attitudes toward care of the dying and need to be considered among nursing educators.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Medical sciences; Woman, Child and Family (WomFam)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-12098 (URN)10.12968/ijpn.2016.22.1.28 (DOI)000389316300006 ()26804954 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84960500345 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-04-05 Created: 2016-04-05 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Österlind, J., Prahl, C., Westin, L., Strang, S., Bergh, I., Henoch, I., . . . Ek, K. (2016). Nursing students' perceptions of caring for dying people, after one year in nursing school. Nurse Education Today, 41, 12-16
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nursing students' perceptions of caring for dying people, after one year in nursing school
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2016 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 41, p. 12-16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To describe Swedish nursing students' perceptions of caring for dying people after the first year of a three year in a nursing programme at three university nursing schools in Sweden. Methods: Interviews (n = 17) were undertaken with nursing students at the end of their first year. A phenomenographic approach was used to design and structure the analysis of the nursing students' perceptions. Results: The analysis resulted in five categories: 1) from abstract to reality, 2) from scary to natural, 3) increased knowledge can give bad conscience, 4) time limits versus fear of end-of-life conversations, and 5) meeting with relatives. Conclusion: Nursing students need to be prepared both theoretically and within practice to encounter death and dying and to care for dying persons. By combining their theoretical knowledge of dying and death with their own encounters of death and dying people in practice, the students can be supported to develop an understanding of dying and death as a natural part of life rather than something frightening. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Death, Dying, End-of-life care, Nursing education, Nursing students, Perceptions
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Woman, Child and Family (WomFam)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-12569 (URN)10.1016/j.nedt.2016.03.016 (DOI)000376705500003 ()27138476 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84962339581 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-06-22 Created: 2016-06-22 Last updated: 2019-08-28Bibliographically approved
Westin, L., Sundler, A. J. & Berglund, M. (2015). Students' experiences of learning in relation to didactic strategies during the first year of a nursing programme: a qualitative study. BMC Medical Education, 15, Article ID 49.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Students' experiences of learning in relation to didactic strategies during the first year of a nursing programme: a qualitative study
2015 (English)In: BMC Medical Education, ISSN 1472-6920, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 15, article id 49Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In university undergraduate nursing programmes, didactic strategies that enable students to learn nursing skills, solve problems and develop reflective and critical thinking and practice are needed. The aim of this study was to explore how different didactic strategies support nursing students’ experiences of learning during the first year of a reconstructed nursing curriculum.

Methods

This study employed a qualitative approach. The data were gathered through written narratives that were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

Results

Nursing students’ experiences of learning through different didactic strategies, were evident in the text. These perspectives were organised into the following themes: To focus on the patient perspective and paying more attention to others, Learning from discussions and reflections on one’s own learning, Training for the professional role and becoming more courage, and Gaining insights into nursing and increasing one’s self-awareness. The education increased the students’ self-awareness, which helped them to pay greater attention to patients and their relative. During the learning process, the students became more courageous, reflected and discovered their shortcomings.

Conclusion

Stated didactic strategies supported a broad base of knowledge on nursing and the professional role of nurses. Educators are challenged to strengthen meaningful learning in nursing and to facilitate the progression of nursing programmes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2015
Keywords
Nursing, Education, Teaching, Qualitative, Learning strategies
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-10817 (URN)10.1186/s12909-015-0338-x (DOI)000351580000001 ()25889028 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84961292156 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-03-31 Created: 2015-03-31 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Ek, K., Westin, L., Prahl, C., Österlind, J., Strang, S., Bergh, I., . . . Hammarlund, K. (2014). Death and caring for dying patients: exploring first-year nursing students' descriptive experiences. International Journal of Palliative Nursing, 20(10), 509-515
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Death and caring for dying patients: exploring first-year nursing students' descriptive experiences
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2014 (English)In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 20, no 10, p. 509-515Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To describe first-year nursing student`s expereinces of witnessing death and providing end-of-life care. Methods: This study is a part of a larger longitudial prject. Interviews (n=17) were conducted with nursing students at the end of their fisrt year of education. To analyse the interviews (lived-expereince description), a thematic analysis, "a search for meaning" (Van Manen, 1997) was applied. Result: The results are presented within the framework of four separate themes: (1) The thought of death is more frightening than the actual epereince, (2) Daring to approach the dying patient and offering something of oneself, (3) The expereince of not sufficing in the face of death and (4) being confronted with one`s own feelings. Conclusion: Nursing students require continous support and opportunity to reflect and discuss their experiences about caring for dying patients and confronting death throughout the entirety of their education. In addition, teachers and clinical superviosors need t give support using reflective practice to help students to devlo confidence in their capacity for caring dying patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mark Allen Group, 2014
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-10176 (URN)10.12968/ijpn.2014.20.10.509 (DOI)25350217 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84921746402 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Sjuksköterskestudenters erfarenheter av och attityder till att vårda döende personer som grund för utveckling av undervisning i pallaitiv vård
Available from: 2014-11-18 Created: 2014-11-10 Last updated: 2019-09-11Bibliographically approved
Strang, S., Bergh, I., Ek, K., Hammarlund, K., Prahl, C., Westin, L., . . . Henoch, I. (2014). Swedish nursing students' reasoning about emotionally demanding issues in caring for dying patients. International Journal of Palliative Nursing, 20(4), 194-200
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish nursing students' reasoning about emotionally demanding issues in caring for dying patients
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2014 (English)In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 194-200Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: To describe nursing students' reasoning about emotionally demanding questions concerning the care of dying patients.

METHODS: The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD) Scale was completed by students at the beginning of their education, and there was great variation in the responses to five items. At a follow-up measurement in the second year, an open-ended question, 'How did you reason when completing this question?', was added to each of the these five items. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the responses.

RESULTS: Of 140 students who completed the FATCOD, 111 provided free-text responses. The analysis of these responses revealed three themes: death perceptions, the students' understanding of their current situation, and the nurse's responsibility.

CONCLUSION: This study provides useful information on students' reasoning about emotionally demanding questions relating to the care of dying patients. Such knowledge is valuable in helping students to overcome their fear and fulfil their expectations concerning their future proficiency.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mark Allen Group, 2014
Keywords
Death, End-of-life care, Nursing education, Nursing students, Perceptions
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Medical sciences; Woman, Child and Family (WomFam)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-9496 (URN)10.12968/ijpn.2014.20.4.194 (DOI)24763328 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84902116098 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-06-17 Created: 2014-06-17 Last updated: 2019-08-28Bibliographically approved
Svanström, R., Johansson Sundler, A., Berglund, M. & Westin, L. (2013). Suffering caused by care - elderly patients’ experiences in community care. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 8(1), Article ID 20603.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Suffering caused by care - elderly patients’ experiences in community care
2013 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 20603Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Growing old involves many changes in life and implies an increased risks of illness and different forms of disabilities. Life may change in a radical way when a person gets a disease like dementia or moves to a nursing home due to disabilities or needs. In both cases, it often leads to an increased dependency on care where the patient becomes exposed and vulnerable and thereby at a higher risk for experiencing different forms of suffering.

Aim: The aim of this study was to elucidate and gain a deeper understanding of elderly patients’ experiences of suffering in relation to community care in nursing homes and home care services.

Materials and methods: A lifeworld hermeneutical approach was used. Phenomenological interviews and conversations with an open approach were conducted and analysed with a focus on meanings.

Findings: The findings were presented in four main themes; an absence of the other in care, an absence of dialogues, a sense of alienation and a sense of insecurity. The findings in this study revealed that persons who were cared for in nursing homes and home care services sometimes were exposed to an unnecessary suffering. The suffering sometimes was caused by various caring actions, that is, unnecessary suffering. The suffering caused by care that aroused was due to caregiver’s inability to be present, to show their face, and truly meet the patient.

Conclusion: Suffering from care increased the elderly patients’ feelings of insecurity, loneliness, and alienation; this seemed to be the foundation for patients’ experiences of being outside a human community. There was a lack of knowledge and understanding about the patient’s lifeworld.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CoAction Publishing, 2013
Keywords
Elderly, care, dementia, lifeworld, patient experiences, suffering
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-8657 (URN)10.3402/qhw.v8i0.20603 (DOI)000327497600001 ()24262375 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84888356601 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-11-28 Created: 2013-11-28 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Dahlén, I., Westin, L. & Adolfsson, A. (2012). Experience of being a low priority patient during waiting time at an emergency department. Psychology Research and Behavior Management, 5, 1-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experience of being a low priority patient during waiting time at an emergency department
2012 (English)In: Psychology Research and Behavior Management, ISSN 1179-1578, E-ISSN 1179-1578, Vol. 5, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Work in the emergency department is characterized by fast and efficient medical efforts to save lives, but can also involve a long waiting time for patients. Patients are given a priority rating upon their arrival in the clinic based on the seriousness of their problem, and nursing care for lower priority patients is given a lower prioritization. Regardless of their medical prioritization, all patients have a right to expect good nursing care while they are waiting. The purpose of this study was to illustrate the experience of the low prioritized patient during their waiting time in the emergency department. Methods: A phenomenological hermeneutic research method was used to analyze an interview transcript. Data collection consisted of narrative interviews. The interviewees were 14 patients who had waited more than three hours for surgical, orthopedic, or other medical care.Results: The findings resulted in four different themes, ie, being dependent on care, being exposed, being vulnerable, and being secure. Lower priority patients are not paid as much attention by nursing staff. Patients reported feeling powerless, insulted, and humiliated when their care was delayed without their understanding what was happening to them. Not understanding results in exposure that violates self-esteem. Conclusion: The goal of the health care provider must be to minimize and prevent suffering, prevent feelings of vulnerability, and to create conditions for optimal patient well being.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dove Press, 2012
Keywords
emergency department, patients, waiting times, nursing staff
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-5777 (URN)10.2147/PRBM.S27790 (DOI)22334799 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84857084041 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-04-25 Created: 2012-04-25 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Westin, L., Öhrn, I. & Danielson, E. (2012). Residents' experiences of encounters with relatives and significant persons: A hermeneutic study. Nursing and Health Sciences, 14(4), 495-500
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Residents' experiences of encounters with relatives and significant persons: A hermeneutic study
2012 (English)In: Nursing and Health Sciences, ISSN 1441-0745, E-ISSN 1442-2018, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 495-500Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to explore and interpret the meaning of residents’ experiences of encounters with their relatives and other significant persons in nursing homes. Twelve residents in three different nursing homes in a western Sweden municipality were interviewed. The method used was hermeneutical text analysis. Three themes emerged in the interpretation of the text: being pleased, being someone, and being inconvenient. These themes were also described through seven subthemes: to be happy to have someone, to make someone else happy, going back in life, to be together in a community, not being alone, to be disconnected, and to be a burden.The study concludes that it is important for nurses in nursing homes to develop a deeper insight into what various social contacts can mean for residents. To develop this knowledge, it is important that nurses in nursing homes can be educated, and supported by clinical supervision, in relation to residents’ experiences of encounters with relatives and other significant persons.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd., 2012
Keywords
carers, encounter, hermeneutics, nursing homes, residents and relatives
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-6538 (URN)10.1111/j.1442-2018.2012.00731.x (DOI)000311689100011 ()22934917 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84870340350 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-10-15 Created: 2012-10-15 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Berglund, M., Westin, L., Svanström, R. & Johansson Sundler, A. (2012). Suffering caused by care - Patients' experiences from hospital settings. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 7, Article ID 18688.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Suffering caused by care - Patients' experiences from hospital settings
2012 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 7, article id 18688Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Suffering and well-being are significant aspects of human existence; in particular, suffering and well-being are important aspects of patients’ experiences following diseases. Increased knowledge about existential dimensions of illness and healthcare experiences may be needed in order to improve care and reduce unnecessary suffering. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to illuminate the phenomenon of suffering experienced in relation to healthcare needs among patients in hospital settings in Sweden. In this study, we used a reflective lifeworld approach. The data were analysed with a focus on meanings. The results describe the essential meaning of the phenomenon of suffering in relation to healthcare needs. The patients were suffering during care-giving when they felt distrusted or mistreated and when their perspective on illness and health was overlooked. Suffering was found to arise due to healthcare actions that neglected a holistic and patient-centred approach to care. Unfortunately, healthcare experiences that cause patients to suffer seem to be something one needs to endure without being critical. The phenomenon can be described as having four constituents: to be mistreated; to struggle for one’s healthcare needs and autonomy; to feel powerless; and to feel fragmented and objectified. The study concludes that there are problems associated with patients experiencing suffering at the hands of healthcare providers, even if this suffering may not have been caused deliberately to the patient. Consequently, conscious improvements are needed to lessen the suffering caused by care-giving, as are strategies that promote more patient-centred care and patient participation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CoAction Publishing, 2012
Keywords
Caring, suffering, patients’ perspective, lived experiences, lifeworld, existential, attitudes, nursing, participation, phenomenology
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-6539 (URN)10.3402/qhw.v7i0.18688 (DOI)000308419100001 ()22943888 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84875195196 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-10-15 Created: 2012-10-15 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3404-3431

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