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Publications (10 of 35) Show all publications
Kristensen, L. (2019). Eastern Europe proves to be a Nordic mirage [Review]. Studies in East European Cinema, 10(1), 84-86
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Eastern Europe proves to be a Nordic mirage
2019 (English)In: Studies in East European Cinema, ISSN 2040-350X, E-ISSN 2040-3518, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 84-86Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Book Review of Beyond Eastern Noir: reimaging Russia and Eastern Europe in Nordic cinemas, authored by Anna Estera Mrozewicz, Edinburgh University Press, 2018, 256p., ISBN-978-1474418102

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Book review
National Category
Studies on Film
Research subject
Media, Technology and Culture (MTEC)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-16584 (URN)10.1080/2040350X.2018.1540334 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-01-27 Created: 2019-01-27 Last updated: 2019-07-10Bibliographically approved
Bröndum, L. & Kristensen, L. (2019). Work in Improvised Music: Playbour, Improvisation and Neo-liberalism. PARSE Journal (9)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Work in Improvised Music: Playbour, Improvisation and Neo-liberalism
2019 (English)In: PARSE Journal, ISSN 1611-1052, E-ISSN 2002-0953, no 9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper is based on a combination of theoretical and practical research. The purpose of this paper is to discuss digitalisation and its effect on music in relation to the concept of “playbour”. It combines theories of games and labour with the practices of improvisation in live electronic music and economy. We observe similarities between these two research fields, one of which is rooted in the social sciences and philosophy and the other in artistic composition and creative methodologies. Although we make no assessment on a possible causality in the chain of events between theory and practice, we do want to investigate a cross-disciplinary field that combines improvisation, game studies and the organisation of labour. These three fields all use the notion of play to convey different outcomes, which are valorised differently according to the concepts of labour applied. The world of fine art and music composition has in the past been associated with that of game and play,1 and both have been seen as socially formative and educational for the participants. But, as we will argue, it is in our current digital economy that computer games, music production and organisation of work have converged as part of the neo-liberal economy. We will argue that the neo-liberal digital economy flattens the spectrum of musical performance so that it resembles modern play in computer games or in work life. As a consequence of this, improvised music in particular is devalued and the players degraded to immaterial labourers without wage compensation. Our aim is to question how improvisation is valued according to the digital economy, which does not duly compensate musicians for their labour. How can we see musical improvisation as a form of labour that is reduced to modern forms of play? What is it that produces wealth and value in improvised music?

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborg: University of Gothenburg & Platform for Artistic Research Sweden, 2019
Keywords
work, music, playbour, neoliberalism, improvisation
National Category
Musicology Music
Research subject
Media, Technology and Culture (MTEC)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-16876 (URN)
Available from: 2019-05-09 Created: 2019-05-09 Last updated: 2019-05-23Bibliographically approved
Kristensen, L. (2018). Anna Matison: After You’re Gone (Posle tebia, 2016) [Review]. Kinokultura (61)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anna Matison: After You’re Gone (Posle tebia, 2016)
2018 (English)In: Kinokultura, ISSN 1478-6567, no 61Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Review of Anna Matison's film After You’re Gone (Posle tebia, 2016).

Keywords
Russian cinema, Anna Matison, comedy, ballet, dance
National Category
Studies on Film
Research subject
Media, Technology and Culture (MTEC)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-16040 (URN)
Available from: 2018-08-09 Created: 2018-08-09 Last updated: 2018-12-19Bibliographically approved
Mazierska, E. & Kristensen, L. (Eds.). (2018). Contemporary Cinema and Neoliberal Ideology. Oxford and New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contemporary Cinema and Neoliberal Ideology
2018 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this edited collection, an international ensemble of scholars examine what contemporary cinema tells us about neoliberal capitalism and cinema, exploring whether filmmakers are able to imagine progressive alternatives under capitalist conditions. Individual contributions discuss filmmaking practices, film distribution, textual characteristics and the reception of films made in different parts of the world. They engage with topics such as class struggle, debt, multiculturalism and the effect of neoliberalism on love and sexual behaviour. Written in accessible, jargon-free language, Contemporary Cinema and Neoliberal Ideology is an essential text for those interested in political filmmaking and the political meanings of films.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford and New York: Routledge, 2018. p. 252
Keywords
Cinema production, neoliberal ideology, capitalism, political economy, love and sex
National Category
Studies on Film
Research subject
Media, Technology and Culture (MTEC)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14212 (URN)978-1-138-23573-1 (ISBN)978-1-138-23574-8 (ISBN)9781315304076 (ISBN)1-138-23573-3 (ISBN)1-138-23574-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-10-07 Created: 2017-10-07 Last updated: 2018-03-27Bibliographically approved
Kristensen, L. & Burman, C. (2018). Painful Neutrality: Screening the Extradition of the Balts from Sweden. Baltic Screen Media Review, 6(1), 72-92
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Painful Neutrality: Screening the Extradition of the Balts from Sweden
2018 (English)In: Baltic Screen Media Review, ISSN 2346-5492, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 72-92Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The article deals with the extradition of Baltic soldiers from Sweden in 1946 as it is represented in P.O. Enquist’s novel The Legionnaires (1968) and in Johan Bergenstråhle’s film A Baltic Tragedy (1970). The theoretical framework is taken from trauma studies and its equivalent within film studies, where trauma is seen as a repeated occurrence of an event in the past. Literature and moving images become in this regard the means to reach the traumatic event, a way to relive it. What separates the extradition of the Baltic soldiers from other traumas, such as the Holocaust, is that it functions as a guilt complex for failing to prevent the tragedy, which is connected to Sweden’s position of neutrality during World War II and the appeasing all of the warring nations. It is argued that it is a collective trauma that is created by Enquist’s novel, which blows it into national proportions. However, Bergenstråhle’s film changes the focus of the trauma by downplaying the Swedish bad conscience. In this way, the film aims at creating new witnesses to the extradition affair. The analysis looks at reception of both novel and film in order to explain the two different approaches to the historical event as well as the two different time periods in which they are produced. The authors argue that the two years that separate the novel and film explain the political mood of the late 1960s swings towards a deflated revolution in the early 1970s when the film reaches national screens. However, in terms of creating witnesses to the traumatic event, the book and film manage to stir public opinion to the extent that the trauma changes from slowly effacing to collectively being ‘lived’ through remembrance. The paradox is that, while the novel remains a vivid reminder of a painful aftermath to Swedish neutrality during World War II, the film is now almost completely forgotten. The film’s mode of attacking the viewers with I-witness account, juxtaposition and misconduct leads to a rejection of the narrative by Swedish audiences.  

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sciendo, 2018
Keywords
Extradition of Baltic soldiers, Trauma, Creative Non-Fiction, Screen Adaptation, The Legionnaires (Enquist, 1968), A Baltic Tragedy (Bergenstråhle, 1970)
National Category
Studies on Film
Research subject
Media, Technology and Culture (MTEC)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-16690 (URN)10.2478/bsmr-2018-0005 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-03-11 Created: 2019-03-11 Last updated: 2019-07-10Bibliographically approved
Kristensen, L. (2018). Svetlana Baskova’s response to Russian national neoliberalism in For Marx …. In: Ewa Mazierska, Lars Kristensen (Ed.), Contemporary Cinema and Neoliberal Ideology: (pp. 73-87). New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Svetlana Baskova’s response to Russian national neoliberalism in For Marx …
2018 (English)In: Contemporary Cinema and Neoliberal Ideology / [ed] Ewa Mazierska, Lars Kristensen, New York: Routledge, 2018, p. 73-87Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The chapter deals with the film For Marx …  (2012) by the Russian filmmaker Svetlana Baskova, which is a homage to Sergei Eisenstein’s Strike  (1925). Baskova examines it in the context of the peculiar brand of neoliberalism adopted in Russia ruled by Vladimir Putin and the type of cinema promoted by his regime. The chapter argues that while ‘Putin’s cinema’ is expected to convey patriotic values in a way which makes them easy to understand and be embraced by the general public, in exchange for being supported by the state throughout the entire process of production and distribution, Baskova opted out of this system, by making a film which does not adhere either to the dominant ways of making films or to the dominant ideology. The chapter maintains that For Marx …  is a product of cinephilia since it was financially supported by Cine Fantom, a film club based in Moscow, and is an example of ‘non- cinema’, understood as a type of film which ostensibly rejects the principles of cinema. The chapter raises an interesting question, namely whether films in the vein of For Marx …  constitute a serious alternative to the dominant cinema, in contemporary Russia and elsewhere or rather act as a smokescreen, behind which the servants of the authoritarian state perpetuate their ultimately undemocratic cultural practices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Routledge, 2018
Keywords
Svetlana Baskova, Russian cinema, neoliberalism, non-cinema, digital culture
National Category
Studies on Film
Research subject
Media, Technology and Culture (MTEC)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14211 (URN)978-1-138-23573-1 (ISBN)978-1-138-23574-8 (ISBN)9781315304076 (ISBN)1-138-23573-3 (ISBN)1-138-23574-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-10-07 Created: 2017-10-07 Last updated: 2018-02-01Bibliographically approved
Kristensen, L. (2017). Bicycle cinema: Machine identity and the moving image. Thesis Eleven, 138(1), 65-80
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bicycle cinema: Machine identity and the moving image
2017 (English)In: Thesis Eleven, ISSN 0725-5136, E-ISSN 1461-7455, Vol. 138, no 1, p. 65-80Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper examines the relationship between identities and the bicycle as portrayed in films. The analysis finds that taking the viewpoint of the bicycle emancipates the bicycle from being subjected to closure, as the constructionists would have it, and thus articulates the differences with which the bicycle can communicate to its rider. The paper examines the bicycle as depicted in three films: Premium Rush  (Davis Koepp, 2012), A Sunday in Hell  (Jørgen Leth, 1977) and Life on Earth  (Abderrahmane Sissako, 1998). It engages with the concept of ‘interpretative flexibility’ and the development of the bicycle, as examined by Wiebe Bijker and others, and argues that the interpretative flexibility of bicycles does not cease just because the high-wheeler was abandoned and the ‘safety’ bicycle was universally accepted. The fight for the role of the bicycle continues and the bicycle is subject to constant transformations in order to reconstruct it according to human needs. Andrew Feenberg’s modified constructivism is applied to re-examine the technical development of the bicycle, claiming that technology is dependent on specific social structures as well as human agency. The paper argues that just as social structures are negotiable and unfixed at any point in time, the bicycle too is never neutral but remains negotiable and unfixed. Consequently, since the bicycle constantly ‘speaks’ back to the user, there is never closure in the technical development of the bicycle. Drawing on the writings of Bruno Latour and the Deleuzian idea of assemblages, the bicycle and its rider are considered as an organic entity that is constantly forged and un-forged. Understanding the rhetoric of the bicycle machine helps the convergence of a bicycle becoming with becoming a rider, marking the bicycle as equal to its rider. Viewed in this way, the hierarchy of agency collapses and a crystallization emerges out of the rider and bicycle entwinement.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
assemblage, bicycle, cinema, identity, meaning, technology
National Category
Media Studies Studies on Film History of Technology
Research subject
Humanities and Social sciences; Media, Technology and Culture (MTEC)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-13382 (URN)10.1177/0725513616689397 (DOI)000394837000005 ()2-s2.0-85012219106 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-02-13 Created: 2017-02-13 Last updated: 2017-11-27
Kristensen, L. & Wilhelmsson, U. (2017). Roger Caillois and Marxism: A Game Studies Perspective. Games and Culture: A Journal of Interactive Media, 12(4), 381-400
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Roger Caillois and Marxism: A Game Studies Perspective
2017 (English)In: Games and Culture: A Journal of Interactive Media, ISSN 1555-4120, E-ISSN 1555-4139, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 381-400Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The authors look at Caillois’ reflections on the dichotomy between work and leisure in relation to Marxism, whose dialectics are shown to influence the milieu under which Caillois developed his ideas. The contribution interrogates this labor/play dialectic while looking at recent literature on games being produced within the current capitalist and neoliberal system, focusing on phenomena like “playbour” and on key elements discussed in these theories, from the affordances and limitations of technology to the immaterial technological tools used by gamers and game makers. The article argues that looking at Caillois in relation to Marxism would provide an interesting critical perspective, one that has been underexplored by current approaches. The authors note that contemporary concerns on capitalism and games are far from being at odds with Caillois’ distinction between labur and play and suggest that the influence of Marxism on Caillois’ writings would provide an interesting terrain of further discussion.

Keywords
Marxism, Roger Caillois, game studies, surrealism, dialectics, amateur gamer, voluntary play
National Category
Media Studies
Research subject
Media, Technology and Culture (MTEC)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-13543 (URN)10.1177/1555412016681678 (DOI)000400738000005 ()2-s2.0-85019031812 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-05-05 Created: 2017-05-05 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Kristensen, L. (2017). Sergei Taramaev, Liubov’ Lvova: Metamorphosis (Metamorfozis 2015) [Review]. Kinokultura, 55
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sergei Taramaev, Liubov’ Lvova: Metamorphosis (Metamorfozis 2015)
2017 (English)In: Kinokultura, ISSN 0023-2076, E-ISSN 2217-7809, Vol. 55Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [en]

Film review

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bristol: Watershed Media Centre, 2017
National Category
Studies on Film
Research subject
Humanities and Social sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-13321 (URN)
Available from: 2017-01-18 Created: 2017-01-18 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Kristensen, L. & Burman, C. (2017). Soviet Estonian bicycle film: sport, nation and race narratives. Studies in Eastern European Cinema, 8(1), 62-77
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Soviet Estonian bicycle film: sport, nation and race narratives
2017 (English)In: Studies in Eastern European Cinema, ISSN 2040-350X, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 62-77Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article deals with Soviet Estonian bicycle films focusing on sport. Four films are selected for analysis: three documentaries by Hans Roosipuu and the fiction film Kuljetuul/Side Wind (1983) by Raul Tammet. The films show a chronological development of the bicycle race film, starting with Hans Roosipuu’s short film Ulekanne 56:13/Transmission 56:13 (1969) and ending with Raul Tammet’s Side Wind, screened on television a few years before Glasnost was introduced in the Soviet Union. The analysis focuses on the issue of national identity building on the notion that sport was one of the few venues where Estonians could express their nationality. The analysis finds that the closer we get to the Glasnost period the more the films tend to highlight the Estonianness or concerns for Estonian bicycle riders. Moreover, in comparison with Western bicycle film, the Estonian films have didactic qualities based in the traditions of socialist realism and a tendency to elevate the bicycle race mechanic due to Soviet bicycling culture being less advanced. Also earlier than their Western counterpart, the Estonian bicycle films are concerned with the greenvalue of the bicycle in a drive to criticize the Soviet authorities. In doing this the Soviet Estonian bicycle films adheres to the dynamic of the Glasnost film.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2017
Keywords
Bicycle race, nationality, Estonian cinema, sports film, sport journalism
National Category
Studies on Film
Research subject
Humanities and Social sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-13092 (URN)10.1080/2040350X.2017.1249191 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-11-11 Created: 2016-11-11 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5364-8036

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