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Nushair, A. M., Saha, A. K., Mandal, A., Rahman, M. A. A., Mohanta, M. K., Hasan, M. A. A. & Haque, M. F. F. (2018). Rhizobium sp.CCNWYC119: a single strain highly effective as biofertilizer for three different peas (Pigeon pea, Sweet pea and Chick pea). Legume Research An International Journal, 41(5), 771-777, Article ID LR-389.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rhizobium sp.CCNWYC119: a single strain highly effective as biofertilizer for three different peas (Pigeon pea, Sweet pea and Chick pea)
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2018 (English)In: Legume Research An International Journal, ISSN 0250-5371, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 771-777, article id LR-389Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Rhizobium spp. was isolated from root nodules of Pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan L.), Sweet pea (Lathyrus sativus L.), Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.). The isolates ware rod shaped, aerobic, gram negative, motile and non-spore forming. Isolates were positive to Catalase, Citrate utilization, Urea hydrolysis, Congored, Nitrification, Oxidase, Triple sugar iron and MacConkey agar test. The isolates can ferment all nine sugars. Then, the isolates identified as Rhizobium spp. Depending on above results were subjected to 16S rRNA sequencing for further confirmation and identification. Surprisingly, theisolates were same strain or member of same cluster of Rhizobium and identified as Rhizobium sp.CCNWYC119 strain based on 16S rRNA sequence (98% similarity). Then, different parameters of soil quality enrichment and plant growth viz.plant height; weight of pods and seeds; number, fresh and dry weight of nodules were studied to test the efficacy of the isolate as biofertilizer. Here, inoculant of Rhizobium sp. isolated from Pigeon pea was used as biofertilizer. The results showed the significant increase of nodulation, enrichment of soil of rhizosphere, plant growth and yield for all three types of inoculated peas as compared with non-inoculated control peas indicating that the isolated strain could be used as a common efficient biofertilizer for Pigeon pea, Sweet pea and Chick pea. It was also found that the isolate grew optimally at temperature 28°C and pH 7.0.Moreover, the isolate was sensitive to the higher concentration of NaCl (>1%) and to antibiotics- Mecillinam, Ciprofloxacin,Cotrimoxazole, Pefloxacin, Ceftazidime and Tetracycline.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Agricultural Research Communication Centre, 2018
Keywords
Rhizobium sp.CCNWYC119, Pea, 16S rDNA sequence, biofertilizer
National Category
Microbiology
Research subject
Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-15804 (URN)10.18805/LR-389 (DOI)000456649700023 ()
Available from: 2018-06-25 Created: 2018-06-25 Last updated: 2019-02-12Bibliographically approved
Hossain, M., Khatun, M. A., Haque, N., Bari, A., Alam, F., Mandal, A. & Kabir, A. H. (2018). Silicon alleviates arsenic-induced toxicity in wheat through vacuolar sequestration and ROS scavenging. International journal of phytoremediation, 20(8), 796-804
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Silicon alleviates arsenic-induced toxicity in wheat through vacuolar sequestration and ROS scavenging
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2018 (English)In: International journal of phytoremediation, ISSN 1522-6514, E-ISSN 1549-7879, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 796-804Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Arsenic (As) is a phytotoxic element causing health hazards. This work investigates whether and how silicon (Si) alleviates As toxicity in wheat. The addition of Si under As-stress significantly improved morphophysiological characteristics, total protein, and membrane stability compared to As-stressed plants, suggesting that Si does have critical roles in As detoxification in wheat. Analysis of arsenate reductase activity and phytosiderophore (PS) release reveals their no involvement in the Si-mediated alleviation of As in wheat. Furthermore, Si supplementation in As-stressed plants showed a significant increase of As in roots but not in shoots compared with the plants grown under As stress. Further, gene expression analysis of two chelating molecules, TaPCS1 (phytochelatin synthase) and TaMT1 (metallothionein synthase) showed significant induction due to Si application under As stress compared with As-stressed plants. It is consistent with the physiological observations and suggests that alleviation of As toxicity in rice might be associated with As sequestration in roots leading to reduced As translocation in shoots. Furthermore, increased catalase, peroxidase, and glutathione reductase activities in roots imply the active involvement of reactive oxygen species scavenging for protecting wheat plants from As-induced oxidative injury. The study provides mechanistic evidence on the beneficial effect of Si on As toxicity in wheat plants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Arsenic stress, vacuolar sequestration, wheat, ROS scavenging
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Research subject
Biotechnology; Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-15591 (URN)10.1080/15226514.2018.1425669 (DOI)000432634400007 ()29775096 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85047275644 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-14 Created: 2018-06-14 Last updated: 2018-09-03Bibliographically approved
Nahar, N., Rahman, A., Ghosh, S., Nawani, N. & Mandal, A. (2017). Functional studies of AtACR2 gene putatively involved in accumulation, reduction and/or sequestration of arsenic species in plants. Biologia (Bratislava), 72(5), 520-526
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Functional studies of AtACR2 gene putatively involved in accumulation, reduction and/or sequestration of arsenic species in plants
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2017 (English)In: Biologia (Bratislava), ISSN 0006-3088, E-ISSN 1336-9563, Vol. 72, no 5, p. 520-526Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Food-based exposure to arsenic is a human carcinogen and can severely impact human health resulting in many cancerous diseases and various neurological and vascular disorders. This project is a part of our attempts to develop new varieties of crops for avoiding arsenic contaminated foods. For this purpose, we have previously identified four key genes, and molecular functions of two of these, AtACR2 and AtPCSl, have been studied based on both in silico and in vivo experiments. In the present study, a T-DNA tagged mutant, (SALK-143282C with mutation in AtACR2 gene) of Arabidopsis thaliana was studied for further verification of the function of AtACR2 gene. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analyses revealed that this mutant exhibits a significantly reduced expression of the AtACR2 gene. When exposed to 100 μM of arsenate (AsV) for three weeks, the mutant plants accumulated arsenic approximately three times higher (778 μg/g d. wt.) than that observed in the control plants (235 μg/g d. wt.). In contrast, when the plants were exposed to 100 μM of arsenite (AsIII), no significant difference in arsenic accumulation was observed between the control and the mutant plants (535 μg/g d. wt. and 498 μg/g d. wt., respectively). Also, when arsenate and arsenite was measured separately either in shoots or roots, significant differences in accumulation of these substances were observed between the mutant and the control plants. These results suggest that AtACR2 gene is involved not only in accumulation of arsenic in plants, but also in conversion of arsenate to arsenite inside the plant cells. © 2017 Institute of Molecular Biology, Slovak Academy of Sciences.

Keywords
Arabidopsis thaliana, arsenate reductase 2 gene, arsenic accumulation, arsenic speciation, IC-ICP-DRC-MS, RT-PCR
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Botany
Research subject
Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14272 (URN)10.1515/biolog-2017-0062 (DOI)000404241300006 ()2-s2.0-85021444188 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-30 Created: 2017-10-30 Last updated: 2018-02-16Bibliographically approved
Rahman, A., Olsson, B., Jass, J., Nawani, N., Ghosh, S. & Mandal, A. (2017). Genome Sequencing Revealed Chromium and Other Heavy Metal Resistance Genes in E. cloacae B2-Dha. Journal of Microbial & Biochemical Technology, 9(5), 191-199
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genome Sequencing Revealed Chromium and Other Heavy Metal Resistance Genes in E. cloacae B2-Dha
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Microbial & Biochemical Technology, E-ISSN 1948-5948, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 191-199Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The previously described chromium resistant bacterium, Enterobacter cloacae B2-DHA, was isolated from leather manufacturing tannery landfill in Bangladesh. Here we report the entire genome sequence of this bacterium containing chromium and other heavy metal resistance genes. The genome size and the number of genes, determined by massive parallel sequencing and comparative analysis with other known Enterobacter genomes, are predicted to be 4.22 Mb and 3958, respectively. Nearly 160 of these genes were found to be involved in binding, transport, and catabolism of ions as well as efflux of inorganic and organic compounds. Specifically, the presence of two chromium resistance genes, chrR and chrA was verified by polymerase chain reaction. The outcome of this research highlights the significance of this bacterium in bioremediation of chromium and other toxic metals from the contaminated sources.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Omics Publishing Group, 2017
Keywords
Genome Sequencing, Bioremediation, Toxic metals, Enterobacter cloacae, Gene annotation
National Category
Bioinformatics and Systems Biology
Research subject
Biotechnology; Bioinformatics; INF501 Integration of -omics Data
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14401 (URN)10.4172/1948-5948.1000365 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-11-14 Created: 2017-11-14 Last updated: 2018-11-16Bibliographically approved
Saha, A. K., Sultana, N., Mohanta, M. K., Mandal, A. & Haque, F. (2017). Identification and Characterization of Azo Dye Decolourizing Bacterial Strains, Alcaligenes faecalis E5.Cd and A. faecalis Fal.3 Isolated from Textile Effluents. American Scientific Research Journal for Engineering, Technology, and Sciences (ASRJETS), 31(1), 163-175
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identification and Characterization of Azo Dye Decolourizing Bacterial Strains, Alcaligenes faecalis E5.Cd and A. faecalis Fal.3 Isolated from Textile Effluents
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2017 (English)In: American Scientific Research Journal for Engineering, Technology, and Sciences (ASRJETS), ISSN 2313-4410, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 163-175Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study was designed for isolation and characterization of azo dye decolourizing bacteria which is a prerequisite for developing a microorganism-facilitated treatment of polluting dyes. In this study nine types of bacteria which were able to decolourize three types of azo dyes (Blue H/C, Red 3B and Yellow 3R dye) were isolated from textile effluents collected from Gazipur industrial area in Bangladesh. Depending on 16S rDNA analysis, the most efficient decolourizing bacterium for the Blue H/C and the Red 3B dye was identified as Alcaligenesfaecalis strain E5.Cd while that for the Yellow 3R dye was identified as Alcaligenesfaecalis strain Fal.3. After characterization, both A. faecalis E5.Cdand A. faecalis Fal.3 were found to grow optimally at 35 0 C and at pH 7 and pH 8, respectively. Both of these strains were sensitive to all antibiotics studied except for Bacitracin. Also, both strains showed maximum decolourization activities after 96 hours incubation in MS media at pH 7 (up to 93%) and pH 8 (up to 94%), at 35 0 C temperature ( up to 91%), at 50 ppm initial dye concentration (up to 92%), at 20% inoculum size (up to 93%), and at supplementation of 1% co-substrate (up to 93%).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Global Society of Scientific Research and Researchers, 2017
Keywords
Textile effluent, Azo dye, Decolourization, Alcaligenes faecalis
National Category
Microbiology Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Research subject
Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14273 (URN)
Available from: 2017-10-30 Created: 2017-10-30 Last updated: 2018-02-16
Rahman, A., Nahar, N., Nawani, N. N. & Mandal, A. (2017). Investigation on Arsenic-Accumulating and Arsenic-Transforming Bacteria for Potential Use in the Bioremediation of Arsenics. In: Surajit Das, Hirak Ranjan Dash (Ed.), Handbook of Metal-Microbe Interactions and Bioremediation: (pp. 509-519). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigation on Arsenic-Accumulating and Arsenic-Transforming Bacteria for Potential Use in the Bioremediation of Arsenics
2017 (English)In: Handbook of Metal-Microbe Interactions and Bioremediation / [ed] Surajit Das, Hirak Ranjan Dash, Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 2017, p. 509-519Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this chapter, arsenic-accumulating and arsenic- transformingbacterial strains that can be employed as a sourcefor cost-effective and eco-friendly bioremediation of arsenicsfrom contaminated environments have been reviewed. Thischapter demonstrates that many naturally occurring bacterialstrains like B1-CDA have the potential for reducing arseniccontent in contaminated sources to safe levels. Therefore,the socioeconomic impact of this kind of microorganisms ishighly significant for those countries, especially in the developingworld, where impoverished families and villages aremost impacted. Therefore, this discovery should be consideredto be the most significant factor in formulating nationalstrategies for effective poverty elimination. Besides humanarsenic contamination, these bacterial strains will also benefitlivestock and native animal species, and the outcome ofthese studies is vital not only for people in arsenic-affectedareas but also for human populations in other countries thathave credible health concerns as a consequence of arseniccontaminatedwater and foods.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 2017
National Category
Microbiology
Research subject
Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14275 (URN)9781498762427 (ISBN)9781498762434 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-10-30 Created: 2017-10-30 Last updated: 2018-02-16Bibliographically approved
Nahar, N., Rahman, A., Nawani, N. N., Ghosh, S. & Mandal, A. (2017). Phytoremediation of arsenic from the contaminated soil using transgenic tobacco plants expressing ACR2 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana. Journal of plant physiology (Print), 218, 121-126
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Phytoremediation of arsenic from the contaminated soil using transgenic tobacco plants expressing ACR2 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana
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2017 (English)In: Journal of plant physiology (Print), ISSN 0176-1617, E-ISSN 1618-1328, Vol. 218, p. 121-126Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We have cloned, characterized and transformed the AtACR2 gene (arsenic reductase 2) of Arabidopsis thaliana into the genome of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum, var Sumsun). Our results revealed that the transgenic tobacco plants are more tolerant to arsenic than the wild type ones. These plants can grow on culture medium containing 200μM arsenate, whereas the wild type can barely survive under this condition. Furthermore, when exposed to 100μM arsenate for 35days the amount of arsenic accumulated in the shoots of transgenic plants was significantly lower (28μg/g d wt.) than that found in the shoots of non-transgenic controls (40μg/g d wt.). However, the arsenic content in the roots of transgenic plants was significantly higher (2400μg/g d. wt.) than that (2100μg/g d. wt.) observed in roots of wild type plants. We have demonstrated that Arabidopsis thaliana AtACR2 gene is a potential candidate for genetic engineering of plants to develop new crop cultivars that can be grown on arsenic contaminated fields to reduce arsenic content of the soil and can become a source of food containing no arsenic or exhibiting substantially reduced amount of this metalloid.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Arabidopsis thaliana, Arsenic, AtACR2 overexpression, Heavy metal accumulation, Nicotiana tabacum, Phytoremediation
National Category
Botany Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Research subject
Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14271 (URN)10.1016/j.jplph.2017.08.001 (DOI)000413327800014 ()28818758 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85031780264 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-30 Created: 2017-10-30 Last updated: 2018-02-16Bibliographically approved
Yewale, P. P., Rahman, A., Nahar, N., Saha, A., Jass, J., Mandal, A. & Nawani, N. N. (2017). Sources of Metal Pollution, Global Status, and Conventional Bioremediation Practices. In: Surajit Das, Hirak Ranjan Dash (Ed.), Handbook of Metal–Microbe Interactions and Bioremediation: (pp. 25-40). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sources of Metal Pollution, Global Status, and Conventional Bioremediation Practices
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2017 (English)In: Handbook of Metal–Microbe Interactions and Bioremediation / [ed] Surajit Das, Hirak Ranjan Dash, Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 2017, p. 25-40Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Pollution control has become a priority task for global regulatory authorities. The framing of regulations, guidelines, and implementation of pollution awareness and control programs has begun at a massive scale. Heavy metals that are one of the most challenging pollutants that affect humans, animals, plants, and the ecosystem health. The sources of different metals and their toxicities are described. Current approaches in bioremediation are addressed along with the challenges posed by them. Furthermore, recent developments in biotechnology that offer novel ways to recover metals from contaminated sites are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 2017
Keywords
Metal Pollution, Bioremediation, Human Health, Microbial Biotechnology
National Category
Natural Sciences Biological Sciences Microbiology
Research subject
Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14283 (URN)9781498762427 (ISBN)9781498762434 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-11-01 Created: 2017-11-01 Last updated: 2018-02-16Bibliographically approved
Rahman, A., Nahar, N., Olsson, B. & Mandal, A. (2016). Complete Genome Sequence of Enterobacter cloacae B2-DHA: a Chromium-Resistant Bacterium. Genome Announcements, 4(3), Article ID e00483-16.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Complete Genome Sequence of Enterobacter cloacae B2-DHA: a Chromium-Resistant Bacterium
2016 (English)In: Genome Announcements, ISSN 2169-8287, E-ISSN 2169-8287, Vol. 4, no 3, article id e00483-16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previously, we reported a chromium-resistant bacterium, Enterobacter cloacae B2-DHA, isolated from the landfills of tannery industries in Bangladesh. Here, we investigated its genetic composition using massively parallel sequencing and comparative analysis with other known Enterobacter genomes. Assembly of the sequencing reads revealed a genome of ~4.21 Mb in size.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society for Microbiology, 2016
Keywords
Enterobacter cloacae, Genome sequencing, de novo assembly, Gene annotation
National Category
Bioinformatics and Systems Biology
Research subject
Bioinformatics; Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-12317 (URN)10.1128/genomeA.00483-16 (DOI)27257201 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85009965114 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-06-01 Created: 2016-06-01 Last updated: 2018-08-23Bibliographically approved
Rahman, A., Nahar, N., Jass, J., Olsson, B. & Mandal, A. (2016). Complete genome sequence of Lysinibacillus sphaericus B1-CDA: a bacterium that accumulates arsenics. Genome Announcements, 4(1), Article ID e00999-15.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Complete genome sequence of Lysinibacillus sphaericus B1-CDA: a bacterium that accumulates arsenics
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2016 (English)In: Genome Announcements, ISSN 2169-8287, E-ISSN 2169-8287, Vol. 4, no 1, article id e00999-15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Here, we report the genomic sequence and genetic composition of an arsenic resistant bacterium Lysinibacillus sphaericus B1-CDA. Assembly of the sequencing reads revealed that the genome size is ~4.5 Mb encompassing ~80% of the chromosomal DNA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society for Microbiolology, 2016
National Category
Bioinformatics and Systems Biology
Research subject
Natural sciences; Bioinformatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-11733 (URN)10.1128/genomeA.00999-15 (DOI)26798084 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85009977094 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-12-01 Created: 2015-12-01 Last updated: 2018-08-23Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6319-4055

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